Arco di Giano
Arco di Giano
4
Historic SitesAncient RuinsPoints of Interest & Landmarks

Top ways to experience Arco di Giano and nearby attractions

The area
Address
Neighborhood: Aventine
Contrary to the chaos of the city, the Aventine is Rome’s oasis. A neighborhood made up of a patchwork of ancient churches, hidden gardens, private homes and embassies, peace and quiet is top priority and the vibe definitely friends and family. Take a walk around the Aventine and you’ll find a treasure hunt of surprises like the clever little keyhole at the Knights of Malta entrance (the only place you’ll find a line) along with Parco Savello (Giardino degli Aranci) next to the ancient Santa Sabina church. Keep your eyes on the 1960s architecture, several modern buildings are built atop Rome’s original 4th century BC wall.
How to get there
  • Fori Imperiali-Colosseo • 10 min walk
  • Colosseo • 10 min walk
Reach out directly

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

Popular mentions

4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles100 reviews
Excellent
16
Very good
46
Average
35
Poor
3
Terrible
0

KodoDrummer
Buenos Aires, Argentina65,080 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2018 • Friends
A 4th-century arch, the historical significance, and dedication of which are not certain. Some believe that it was dedicated to Roman Emperor Constantine the Great (emperor 306-337, or to his son, Constantius II who also became Roman Emperor (337-361).
Written March 4, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

JeanPaulBelmondo
Basel, Switzerland734 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2016 • Couples
It's so called after one of the oldest Roman divinities, the two faced Janus, guardian of the gates. It was build towards the 4th century B.C. on the site of the Foro Boario and it was meant to offer merchants shelter against the threats of sun and rain. Near the arch a modern gate allows access to a well preserved section of the cloaca maxima, the main channel for sewage water flowing out of ancient Rome. If you happen to be here on the weekend I advise you to go to the nearby farmers market in Via di San Teodoro (saturday and sunday till 16.00 o'clock).
Written March 18, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Travelmomof2littles
Friendswood, TX108 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2013 • Family
Probabaly not something you'll make a special attempt to go see, but a great example of the ancient Rome just sitting around on street corners all over Rome. It has a great fun story for kids - it was shelter for ancient beef sellers. They sold "on the hoof" of necessity. No refrigeration in those days. It isn't publicly accessible, but you can walk around it and see it through the fence. Next door to the Mouth of Truth.
Written July 1, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Richard H
Leeds, UK326 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2022 • Solo
Quite close to the Mouth of Truth.
The arch appears to be permanently cordoned off.
Not a lot to see, don't bother unless you're walking past!
Written April 6, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Greg
Cambridge, UK5,209 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2020 • Friends
This is the last remaining quadrifrons triumphal arch and not far from Ponte Palitano and Temple of Hercules. Not an attraction to go out of your way for but makes for a nice Roman ruin photograph.
Written February 23, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Peter H
Fredericksburg, VA973 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2019 • Solo
Janus was believed to be the first king of Latium, the people that created the Ancient Latin language, from which all Romance languages eventually derived. Archeologists have found evidence that the Latium culture, next to the Tiber River developed agricultural skills in 1100 BC and masonry has been found that is often indicative of the beginnings of civilization. This Arch of Janus was brought from the town of Falerii in 270 BC. As a result, Caesar Domitian expanded the area around it. It is very near The Temple of Hercules Victor, but, as you round the corner and blink, you’ll miss it. Given the relative importance of Janus as an Ancient Roman God, you should try to catch this one while touring Ancient Rome.
Written June 28, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Tom J
London, UK1,622 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2019 • Couples
The arch of Janus is the last 4 sided arch in Rome and rather unique in its own right. It is not as well preserved as the others you will come across but is interesting to check out none the least due to the fact it is 4 sided and different in that sense.
Written May 9, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

phat_dawg_21
Alpharetta, GA13,464 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2019 • Couples
The Arch of Janus is the only quadrifrons triumphal arch preserved in Rome. The name is derived from the structure's four-fronted, four-arched configuration. The ancient Roman god Janus (Ianus Quadrifons), was sometimes depicted with four faces.

There are two theories as to why it is here. One is that it was set up at a crossroads at the northeastern limit of the Forum Boarium, close to the Velabrum, over the Cloaca Maxima drain that went from the Forum to the River Tiber.

The other is that it was built to provide shelter for the traders at the Forum Boarium cattle market. Interestingly, there is still a market about 100 meters from this arch.

It was built in the early 4th century AD, using spolia, i.e. material from earlier buildings, including bricks, together with pottery shards, and was covered with white marble, also taken from earlier buildings.

In the Middle Ages, the Frangipane family transformed the building into a fortress, and so it survived intact until 1830. Then, the attic and top were torn down because they were erroneously believed to not belong to the original structure. However, there is a staircase within the north-west pier which would have given access to this top floor. Iron pins originally held together the marble blocks but were removed in the Middle Ages, leading to the monument’s present pock-marked look.

Fragments of the dedicatory inscription are still preserved inside the nearby church of San Giorgio in Velabro.

The arch has not been accessible to the public since the explosion of a bomb in front of San Giorgio in Velabro, on the night of 27 July 1993. It is the one monument of the Forum Boarium that remains unrestored.
Written May 4, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

PaulB
Maastricht, The Netherlands3,127 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2019 • Friends
We coincidentially passed this arch on our way to the Marcello Theater.
Indeed, it's one of the many remains in this area.
The Giano arch has an entrance on four sides and was probably built in the mid-fourth century.
Perhaps the arch was dedicated to Constantine, but that is not certain. The modern name does not refer to Janus, the deity with two faces, but has to do with the Latin word ianus, which denotes a covered passage or gate.
It was not a triumphal arch but a building that was probably used by the bankers of the forum.
In the Middle Ages, the building was converted into a fortress by the Frangipani family and they closed the gates. When the medieval additions were removed in the 19th century, the attic and the original crown were also lost because they were not recognized as original parts of the structure.
The keystones of the arches are decorated with sculpture (strongly weathered) and represent Roma and Juno (seated) and Minerva and Ceres (standing). On the outside, above a high base, two rows of niches have been made. On the most important sides, these are all shell niches. On the sides that were probably less important, most niches are blind. There were probably statues in the open niches.
Written April 2, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

The Spanish Steps Apartment
Rome, Italy30,217 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2017 • Friends
Great to see the Arch of Janus getting some tender love and care -- but just be aware some it is currently under scaffolding.
Written April 10, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Showing results 1-10 of 22
Is this your Tripadvisor listing?
Own or manage this property? Claim your listing for free to respond to reviews, update your profile and much more.
Claim your listing

Arco di Giano - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (with Photos)

Frequently Asked Questions about Arco di Giano

According to Tripadvisor travelers, these are the best ways to experience Arco di Giano:



Arco di Giano Information

Excellent Reviews

16

Very Good Reviews

46

Arco di Giano Photos

143