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Arco Farnese

24 Reviews
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Arco Farnese

24 Reviews
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Via Giulia, Rome Italy
Getting there
Ottaviano - San Pietro - Musei VaticaniRome Metro17 min
LepantoRome Metro18 min
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Faster Than Skip-the-Line: Vatican, Sistine Chapel and St. Peter's Basilica Tour
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Faster Than Skip-the-Line: Vatican, Sistine Chapel and St. Peter's Basilica Tour

24,711 reviews
Home to some of the world’s most iconic paintings, the Vatican Museums attract huge crowds. Save yourself hours of waiting by booking this skip-the-line tour of the Sistine Chapel, Raphael’s Rooms, and St. Peter’s Basilica (when the option is selected) in Rome. Early morning and evening tour options mean you can explore the complex during far less crowded time slots. Upgrade to a small-group tour limited to 10 people for a more personalized experience.
$60.59 per adult
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Manuela L wrote a review Dec 2019
Luxembourg City, Luxembourg7,107 contributions2,795 helpful votes
It's so nice to walk in Via Giulia and to sea this nice Arc, a bridge to lead to Villa Giulia, a museum, but most often closed, the arc is growed with wild grapes, a very romantic arc.
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Date of experience: January 2019
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SoCalOregonian wrote a review Oct 2019
Murrieta, California9,190 contributions1,106 helpful votes
This small bridge spanning via Giulia was intended to be much longer. In fact, it was planned to cross the Tiber and connect the Palazzo with Villa Farnesina. This arch was designed by Michelangelo was the only portion ever built. .
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Date of experience: April 2019
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VoyagerAimerSourire wrote a review Aug 2018
Princeton, New Jersey363 contributions58 helpful votes
The Arco Farnese allows a discreet exit from the Palazzo Farnese (via an overhead crossing of the Via Giulia). We visited during a dry and hot month of August and yet the vines from the Palazzo Farnese were green and lush, slowly growing across the arch (to provide some shady relief to the passersby below (see our uploaded photo). On its own, this architectural feature may be considered average by Rome's lofty standards, but it clearly adds to the very special charm of this quiet Roman street.
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Date of experience: August 2018
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SoCalOregonian wrote a review Jun 2018
Murrieta, California9,190 contributions1,106 helpful votes
One more interesting thing to see while walking along Via Giulia, this arch constructed in 1603 was originally intended to connect the Palazzo Farnese with other properties closer to the Tiber. On either side of the arch are the Fleur-de-lis, symbol of the Farnese family. The arch is located next to the Chiesa di Santa Maria dell’Orazione e Morte.
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Date of experience: April 2018
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KTGP wrote a review Nov 2016
Adelaide, Australia5,912 contributions695 helpful votes
The Farnese Arch was designed by Michelangelo and was meant to be a bridge, which linked Palazzo Farnese with another family property across the Tiber, Villa Farnesina. The bridge never happened and this arch was as far as the project ever went. Seems a tad extravagant, given Ponte Sisto was already in place, which means they would have had to walk less than one kilometre, from property to property. The arch also features the fleur-de-lis, the symbol of the Farnese family. Lovely arch located in Via Giulia, a very progressive street of 16th century Rome. It runs for one kilometre in a straight line, a rare thing at the time in Rome. The work was tasked to Donato Bramante and it was named after Pope Julius II, who initiated and designed the street. Near the arch is Fontana del Masherone, a lovely fountain built 1626, made from ancient Roman pieces, commissioned by the Farnese Family.
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Date of experience: May 2016
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