Chiesa del Domine Quo Vadis

Chiesa del Domine Quo Vadis

Chiesa del Domine Quo Vadis
4.5
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Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

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4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles98 reviews
Excellent
44
Very good
41
Average
12
Poor
1
Terrible
0

Jae W. Lee
Long Island, NY5,906 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2016 • Couples
Domine Quo Vadis site is a holy site for Christians, and a memorable site even for non-Christians. According to the Apocryphal Acts of Peter, Peter was fleeing from Rome along Via Appia Antica (Ancient Appia Way) to avoid possible crucifixion as a leader of Christians when he met Jesus Christ walking toward him from the opposite direction. When surprised Peter asked Jesus the famous question "Domine, Quo Vadis?" (Lord, Where Are You Going?), Jesus answered, " eo Romam iterum crucifigi" ("I am going to Rome to be crucified again"). Realizing his cowardly mistake, Peter returned to Rome for his continued ministry, leading to his eventual crucifixion upside-down. At their meeting site, Chiesa del Domine Quo Vadis (Church of Domine Quo Vadis) was built. Rome's Christian Tour buses tend to pass by this holy site along Via Appia Antica without stopping. Some tour guides just point the Domine Quo Vadis, and the tourists on the bus end up looking it back while their tour buses pass by the site at full speed on their way to nearby catacombs. You can visit this church by Bus 118 for € 1.5 one way or for free with one of the Rome tourist travel card. You can catch Bus 118 either at "Celio Vibbena" bus stop behind Colosseo or "Terme Caracalla" bus stop near Circo Massimo metro stop. "Celio Vibbena" bus stop behind Colosseo is easier to access than the bus stop near Circo Massimo metro stop. However, taking Bus 118 at "Terme Caracalla" bus stop near Circo Massimo metro stop is surer way. [Direction: (1) Take metro Line B (Blue Line) to Circo Massimo (one stop past Colosseo stop coming from Roma Termini). Get off the metro, and exit the metro station Via Viale Aventino exit. Standing at the metro exit, make sure that Circo Massima (field where chariot races used to take place in Ancient Rome) is across Via Viale Aventino. After making sure that you are on the correct side, turn right and follow Via Viale Aventino to the corner --> Turn right at the corner on to a broad street, "Vialle delle Terme di Caracalla". Look for a grass median on the road ahead --> Get on to the grass median with pine trees, and look for a bus stop with Bus 118 sign ("Terme Caracalla" stop). If you have a strange feeling that you are in the middle of nowhere, you are at the correct place. In due course of time (40 minute bus cycle), Bus 118 will come. Board the bus, and ask the bus driver to let you off at "Church Domine Quo Vadis". In a few minutes, the bus will drive along Via Cilicia with Aurelian Wall (Roman City Wall) on the left side. As soon as the bus makes right turn away from the wall on to Via Appia Antica, get ready to get off the bus, because your "Via Appia Antica/Domine Quo Vadis" is the 2nd stop from here. Since the bus driver might skip stops if not requested and the sign inside bus is not clear, you had better ask the bus driver again to let you off at "Domine Quo Vadis" stop. The "Domine Quo Vadis" stop is so obscure that you can easily miss it unless you remind the bus driver. At the bus stop, cross Via Appia Antica, and walk to the right hand direction until you come to a street corner on the left side. The Church of Domine Quo Vadis is at this corner. After visiting the church, walk back to the right hand direction to the bus stop for Bus 118 toward Roman wall. The bus will go back past "Terme Caracalla" stop where you boarded Bus 118 to go to the church. --> The bus will stop on Via Viale Aventino right next to Circo Massimo field on the right hand side. You will see Circo Metro station sign ahead of you. You can take metro back to Termini or your next destination. [Attached maps and photos would be helpful] [Warnings: (1) Never miss the bus stop, because walking back to this bus stop is uncomfortable and risky. The road is narrow with extremely narrow pedestrian paths. (2) Don't try to visit this church on Sunday as recommended by "The Rome Toolkit" website. On Sundays, vehicle traffic is banned on Via Appia Antica, including Bus 118.]
Written February 22, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Kryss P
Lakeland, FL678 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2015 • Family
Our tour guide took us by this place, it was very interesting and he told us the story of the Jesus footprints.
Written March 14, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

lexi3
136 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2019
How could anyone not rate this as a “5”? It’s a small church at the start of the Appian Way, itself a draw. Inside are facsimiles of footprints in stone said to be made by Jesus. I believe the original stone was moved to the Vatican. This is the spot where Jesus, after his Crucifixion, met Peter who was fleeing persecution in Rome. Jesus asked “Quo Vadis?” “Where are you going?” I won’t spoil the ending.
Written March 25, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Andy B
Belo Horizonte, MG599 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2017 • Solo
Not much to see there, but, for devout Christians, it is worth a stop, if you're already nearby, at Via Appia Antica. It is located a few hundred feet, after Porta di San Sebastiano. The current church was built in 1637, but there had been a sanctuary, at that location, since the 9th century. It is quite a coincidence (?) that this church is located immediately in front of a sacred field dedicated to Rediculus, the Roman "God of the Return". Travelers worshiped the deity, before their departure on long voyages, and, also, upon returning, to thank the god for their safe journeys. But, nowadays, it is associated with Peter, the Apostle, fleeing persecution in Rome, meeting up with Jesus at that spot, and, subsequently, returning to Rome, to be martyred. Seriously.
Written October 7, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Aniello Saggese
Baronissi, Italy1,882 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2015 • Solo
This little church, named "Santa Maria delle piante", is well known with the name of "Domine quo vadis church" where a legend tells the meeting of Saint Peter with Jesus Christ on the old roman street of the Via Appia. The small church is suggestive. A marble stone on one of the wall tells the story of the church while on the other walls one in front of the other there are two fresco of Saint Peter and Jesus Christ with the words they said in that occasion. The marble footprint on the church floor remember us the old relics that were removed and are now exposed on the San Sebastiano church nearby.
Written September 9, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Riverliver
Cleveland, OH626 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2014 • Couples
The church is along the Apia Antica - the Old Roman Road. It is nothing to look at on the outside. The interior is also small and does not compare to the lovely basilicas of Rome. But there is a relic here that is interesting - the footprints of Jesus. Be on the lookout, as this block of stone with the footprints is right in the middle of the aisle as you walk in - and easy to trip over. It is fascinating to gaze on the footprints of Jesus.
Written January 14, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

_Matea_2411
Groningen, The Netherlands267 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2014 • Couples
After reading Quo vadis from Sienkiewicz- definetly wanted to stop here at least for a moment. It is very simple church, very peaceful and beautiful. It is on the beginning of Via appia antica and definetly worth a stop - here is where according to a legend st Peter met Jesus while he tried to flee persecution in Rome.
Written June 23, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Kimberly M
Sudbury, MA138 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2012 • Family
This church is lovely- very small and situated at the base of the entrance to the Catacombs of Callisto. The highlight of the church is of course the footprints left behind by Jesus. See the website for the full story on how they came to be. The ones at the church are actually a reproduction- to see the originals you have to go to the San Sebastian Catacombs. They are right at the entrance of the church in the center aisle surrounded by a metal enclosure that is at mid calf level so be careful you don't trip over it!
Written August 21, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

John B
Dallas, TX58 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2016 • Couples
After visiting the Catacombs de Castillo, the Domine Quo Vadis is right there. If you are a believer, you should make a stop. Hear about the story of Peter as he was leaving Rome.
Written October 8, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Jesse N
Minnetrista, MN51 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2015 • Family
This church is on the Ancient Appia Antica. It’s the church where Peter and Jesus crossed paths and Jesus left his footprints. Copies of the footprints are still at this small quaint little church, but the originals were moved elsewhere for safe keeping. We were joined by a handful of nuns while we were there. Just a small little place on the busy Appia Antica to go in an say a little prayer.
Written July 24, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Chiesa del Domine Quo Vadis, Rome

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