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Diocletian Bath and the Octagonal Hall

#110 of 1,241 things to do in Rome
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Address: Viale Enrico De Nicola, 79, 00185 Rome, Italy
Phone Number: 06 489 035 00
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9:00 am - 7:45 pm
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Hours:
Tue - Sun 9:00 am - 7:45 pm
Recommended length of visit: <1 hour
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$67*
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TripAdvisor Reviewer Highlights

Read all 314 reviews
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My favourite attraction in Rome!!!

Diocletian Baths are located near the termini and next to Palazzo Massimo. The architecture of the baths interest me even to this day and the architecture of the museum is... read more

5 of 5 starsReviewed 4 days ago
Patrick V
,
Sydney, Australia
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314 Reviews from our TripAdvisor Community

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Showing 124: English reviews
Sydney, Australia
Level Contributor
69 reviews
64 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 36 helpful votes
5 of 5 stars Reviewed 4 days ago NEW

Diocletian Baths are located near the termini and next to Palazzo Massimo. The architecture of the baths interest me even to this day and the architecture of the museum is amazing. Tickets are 7 euros which include Palazzo Altemps, Palazzo Massimo and Diocletian Baths. The artifacts in the museum are so neatly organised and insanely interesting that you will stay... More 

Helpful?
1 Thank Patrick V
Edmonton, Canada
Level Contributor
237 reviews
143 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 97 helpful votes
3 of 5 stars Reviewed 1 week ago

This complex is across the street from Termini railway station, and you can see the huge shells of its walls when you exit the station. It's also close to a museum of Classical art called Palazzo Massimo alle Terme, and there is a combined ticket for both (plus a couple of other museums)---they're all lumped under the name "Museo Nazionale."... More 

Helpful?
Thank Kirk M
Beijing, China
Level Contributor
21 reviews
5 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 4 helpful votes
4 of 5 stars Reviewed 2 weeks ago via mobile

We stumbled across this museum while looking for somewhere to have lunch and we were so glad we went back to check it out. There is so much to see and there was hardly anyone else there. Our kids (both under 9) really engaged with the experience. The only (minor) drawback was the grumpy lady working in the gift shop.

Helpful?
Thank skirza
Level Contributor
58 reviews
44 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 16 helpful votes
3 of 5 stars Reviewed 2 weeks ago

During my entire visit here I had the feeling that all the items on display were the rejects that the Capitoline Museum did not want. I was impressed with the miniatures, and pottery salon. Skip the Bath and go for the Hill.

Helpful?
1 Thank Allen B
Level Contributor
73 reviews
27 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 43 helpful votes
5 of 5 stars Reviewed 5 weeks ago via mobile

Intending to visit the basilica, we found the Roman baths. Not terribly busy, we had space and time to explore the whole complex, which is huge. Great value for only 7 euros.

Helpful?
Thank Mrs_Mc_AU
Fort Worth, Texas
Level Contributor
85 reviews
16 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 23 helpful votes
5 of 5 stars Reviewed June 21, 2016 via mobile

Are you tired of all the crowds at the Vatican and the Forum? The Baths of Diocletian are restful and not full of tourists. fdYou can wander through the courtyard and examine Roman funerary art, and then walk through the amazingly large rooms, imagining when they were full of people in the the various pools and courtyards.

Helpful?
Thank CometFrogs_11
Chesterfield, United Kingdom
Level Contributor
85 reviews
51 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 18 helpful votes
5 of 5 stars Reviewed June 8, 2016 via mobile

This was one of the best museums I've visited in Rome. Based in the parts of the bath remains that were not used to create the basilica, this museum gives a good picture via a film of what the baths used to be. In other halls there are rescued tombs saved from various sites and rebuilt.

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Thank Steven R
Canada
Level Contributor
28 reviews
16 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 14 helpful votes
4 of 5 stars Reviewed June 6, 2016

We visited the Baths of Diocletian only, despite the fact that the tickets to the baths also covers the entrance fees to another 3 sites, mostly due to the fact that it was towards the end of the day and we were tired. It was still worth it, because the baths were a very interesting site to visit. Also, as... More 

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Thank goingreen13
Anchorage, Alaska
Level Contributor
8 reviews
4 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 4 helpful votes
5 of 5 stars Reviewed May 28, 2016

On our second trip to Rome we explored the Diocletian baths, a massive public works from the classic roman empire era. The museum with countless relics and historic finds is enough to fill an entire day. But the rebuilt section of the baths that is now the basilica "Santa Maria degli Angeli de Martire" is the real mind blower! This... More 

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2 Thank akSteve2015
Los Angeles, California
Level Contributor
826 reviews
285 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 559 helpful votes
5 of 5 stars Reviewed May 26, 2016 via mobile

Since we have been to Rome several times, we are hanging in less known places. You get to visit 4 sites with the same ticket for 3 days.

Helpful?
Thank Starviagera

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Staying in Esquilino

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Esquilino
Old school vibe from the very beginning is the only way to describe the Esquilino neighborhood. The Esquilino takes pride in being one of the oldest areas in Rome for its key location on one of the city’s famous seven hills. From an ancient neighborhood to its modern incarnation as a multicultural hub, Esquilino always has something going on—polyglot vendors debate street artists while kids play pick-up basketball games. Look around you: this area isn’t like the historic center. Liberty architecture, large piazzas, and long boulevards mix with archaic arches, secret side alleys, and beautiful churches like Santa Maria Maggiore.
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