Lupa Romana
About
A famous Etruscan statue of a bronze she-wolf nursing Rome's legendary founders, Romulus and Remus.
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The area
Address
Neighborhood: Campitelli
How to get there
  • Fori Imperiali-Colosseo • 9 min walk
  • Colosseo • 9 min walk
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Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

Popular mentions

4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles208 reviews
Excellent
72
Very good
98
Average
34
Poor
4
Terrible
0

Mairwen1
United Kingdom10,807 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2023 • Couples
The bronze statue of the she-wolf, suckling the abandoned twin boys, Romulus and Remus, is immediately recognisable as the classic symbol of Rome. It was an image that we saw many times around the city.
Both the original and the replica can be seen on Capitoline Hill.
The original is inside the Capitoline Museum so you have to pay to go inside to see it. Otherwise, a copy can be freely seen on top of a granite column in the piazza out the front of the museum.
It’s easy to accidentally miss the replica, partly because other much larger statues catch the eye instead and partly because it’s a little hidden along the side of the Senatorio building.
If you stand with your back to the giant Capitolina Staircase and look straight ahead to the building at the far end of the piazza, La Lupa is off to the left of it.
It’s not a large figurine and because it’s at the top of column, you don’t get to see it in any great detail.
Later when we saw the original, I was surprised that it was a lot larger. It was also at eye-level so we had a much better view of it.
Written May 11, 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Malgorzata
12,091 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2019
A really beautiful bronze statue placed on a column with a classic capital. It is the reduced copy of the bronze statue kept in the Capitoline Museums, the classic symbol of Rome, the nursing she-wolf Romulus and Remus. It is located in the column on the left of the Capitol. It is not one of the most impressive monuments , but certainly very significant.
Written April 21, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Alessandro F
Milan, Italy31,889 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2019 • Solo
A she-wolf sucking the mythical twin founders of Rome, Romulus and Remus.
Beside the Senatorio Palace you can see a copy, the original is inside the Capitoline Museum.
This is the symbol of Rome
Written November 23, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Dimitris L
Sydney, Australia48,982 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2017 • Couples
Lupa Romana is a beautiful sculpture, near the Capitoline area. It is a lovely depiction of the She-Wolf and the twins, Romulus and Remus. The Animal is suckling the twins. They are considered, in one of many myths, as the founders of ancient Rome. Rome also is said to derive its name from them. The sculpture itself is rather small and sits on top of a tall column. Worth a look.
Written October 17, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Loretta R
Hermosa Beach, CA395 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2012 • Friends
You can find the original statue of the She-Wolf in the Palazzo dei Conservatori, one building that makes up the entire Capitoline Museum complex. There is some debate on the origins of the statue—whether it is truly Etruscan from the 5th century BC or if it is dating back only to the early Middle Ages. The carbon dating of the piece is highly controversial. Whatever the date, however, it’s a great thrill to see the original She-Wolf statue, which has become so iconic for Rome and all of Italy. The statue depicts the legend of the she-wolf who nurses the lost orphan twin babies, Romulus and Remus. After killing his brother, Romulus would later become the founder of Rome.

TIP: If you visit the Palazzo dei Conservatori to see the She-Wolf, give yourself a lot of time. There is a lot to see here, and you need to be fresh and focused in order to fully appreciate the art and artifacts. Many of the pieces also need historical context, so either read about them ahead of time or get the audio tour. Unlike the Vatican museum, the pieces here aren’t always the most accessible to appreciate without the extra information to bring out the importance of the pieces, and the museum makes no effort to give out that information for free—no description tags by most pieces and not even a map/museum guide with the purchase of a ticket. You’ll be wandering, clueless if you don’t prepare in advance. In the bigger scale of museums, this one isn’t necessarily a crowd-pleaser. It takes a little work. However, there are some obvious pieces that are popular hits—like the She Wolf statue. I do believe that the museum is fantastic; it just comes with some frustrations, too.

Concerning practical information, beware that the staff is also AWFUL! I couldn’t find the entry into the second museum of the Capitoline Museum complex—the Palazzo Nuovo--and I felt like the biggest idiot for not seeing any signs for the entry but there were none. And I guess I wasn’t the only “idiot.” In fact, the problem wasn’t really me, as other tourists were also seeking help. As an impromptu group, we even asked one of the guards at the exit of the Palazzo Nuovo for help. She would not even acknowledge our presence. It was quite stunning. So, I never did enter the Palazzo Nuovo, just the Palazzo dei Conservatori. However, the tickets cover entry into both museums, so I didn’t get the full value of my ticket, unfortunately. I later learned that there is an underground tunnel that connects both museums. I don’t know if that tunnel is the only way into the Palazzo Nuovo, but please stay in the building where you buy the tickets (the Palazzo dei Conservatori), and check the bottom floor for this mysterious tunnel before leaving the Palazzo dei Conservatori.
Written August 5, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Brad
Hong Kong, China173,427 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2015 • Couples
Lupa Romana (Capitoline Wolf) is a bronze sculpture of the legendary she-wolf who famously rescued and nursed the twins Romulus and Remus. This famous image has long been associated with the origins and founding of Rome, making this a neat sculpture to see at the Palazzo dei Conservatori at Capitoline Museum.

Of note and interest the sculpture is believed to be of Etruscan origin (5th century BC). However, carbon dating puts this sculpture at later date around 1000-1150 AD. It is also believed the figures of Romulus and Remus were only added in the late 15th century.

In addition to seeing this famous bronze cast of the Capitoline Wolf found within the Capitoline Museum, there is another version located on a pillar on the side of palace building as you approach from Via di S. Pietro in Carcere from the area of the Roman Forum. This is neat to see as well and makes a good alternative if you don't wish to pay to enter and visit the Capitoline Museum.
Written May 21, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Rhys J
Llanbedr, UK2,929 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2017 • Friends
I saw the Lupa Romana during my exciting three hour tour of Rome with Italy Segway costing us 75 Euros each and good value. I was on a weekend visit with friends from Bwrdd Crwn Caergybi, Cymru / Holyhead Round Table, Wales on our annual rugby trip in the RBS 6 Nations series, choosing the Italy v. Wales match this year. I've visited Rome many times but this was my first tour around it's historical sites on a Segway! This was also my first ride on a Segway and Mattio (Matt) our tour leader patiently took our group of eight through our paces. His expert guidance and tuition followed by plenty of practice ensured I was ready to take my Segway on to the hectic streets of Rome!

Matt carefully and safely led our group on his Segway whilst sharing with us via the wireless headphones we all had, his knowledge on the numerous iconic sites we visited on our tour. Among the many places we visited were the Arch of Constantine, Circus Maximus, Colosseum, Palantine Hill, Parco Savello and it's Orange and Rose Garden and the Roman Forum. I also enjoyed seeing Santa Maria's Church and it's Bocca della Verita wall sculpture, Trajan's Column, Trajan's Forum and the Basilica Ulpia as well as the Lupa Romana. Matt explained as we paused near this striking bronze statue, that it represents the mythical she-wolf suckling the twins, Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome. This is a replica as the original, dating from the 11th and 12th century AD, has been housed at the Palazzo dei Conservatori since apparently 1471. Thank you Matt for taking us to see such an important symbol of Rome's identity. It ticked another box on the long list of places we visited on this educational and fun filled Segway ride around Rome.
Written September 15, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

The Spanish Steps Apartment
Rome, Italy32,493 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2017 • Friends
La Lupa Romana, the Capitoline Wolf, stands on a column to the right and a bit to the back of the piazza of the Capitoline Hill. This is a bronze sculpture of the she-wolf suckling the human twins Romulus and Remus. The she-wolf is part of the legend surrounding the founding of Rome by Romulus, and the symbol of Rome itself.
Written April 12, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Eliza V
Peyia, Cyprus112 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2014 • Couples
After reading the reviews now, I am not sure we saw the real thing (behind a corner of the central building at Piazza del Campidoglio), and it's much smaller than I expected. It was interesting nonetheless!
Written January 19, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Flore
Arad, Romania1,711 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2019
This is the original statue that represents the founders of Rome - Romulus and Remus, who would have been fed by a female wolf. I do not know how many other statues of this kind still exist in Rome or the whole of Italy, on the other hand, there are some copies in different cities in Romania - Timisoara, Brasov, Bucharest. It is amazing how much the history of the Romanian people and of the Roman Empire is to be shared! I invite you to visit those in Romania!
Written December 8, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Lupa Romana - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (2024)

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