Colle Capitolino
Colle Capitolino
4.5
Historic SitesPoints of Interest & LandmarksHistoric Walking AreasLookouts
About
The political and religious center of ancient Rome, this is the smallest, but the most famous, of the Seven Hills of Rome, which features the Senate.
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Tours & experiences
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The area
Neighborhood: Campitelli
How to get there
  • Fori Imperiali-Colosseo • 10 min walk
  • Colosseo • 10 min walk

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Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

Popular mentions

4.5
367 reviews
Excellent
224
Very good
128
Average
12
Poor
2
Terrible
1

Sarah Grace
London, UK5,390 contributions
Dec 2019 • Family
What a place, what a city! We absolutely love it though it was very busy back in December 2019, we had such a good time playing tourist.

Here at this hill one can see the magnificent testimony to old architecture designs and monuments that stood well through the sand of time.

Recommended and watch out if you’re walking about for the traffic!
Written September 12, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Ben F
Bloomington, IN1,479 contributions
Mar 2023 • Solo
The vistas over the hill on which this cute little plaza sits offer nice views of the bustling street and neighborhood below, whereas the opposite direction is the way to access the Roman Forum and the Via dei Fori Imperiali. Surrounding you are great museums to explore. It’s amazing that even though the location is so optimal, I sense not as many visitors to Rome know about this urban spot compared to the must-sees and must-dos. The lack of crowding makes an experience feel more personal.
Written June 21, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Alessandro F
Milan, Italy26,317 contributions
Nov 2019 • Solo
The hill was known as Mons Saturnius , dedicated to the god Saturn .
This seventh hill of Rome contains few ancient ground level ruins, as they are almost entirely covered up by Medieval and Renaissance palaces .
Here was the starting of name Rome Caput Mundi.
Written November 24, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Mairwen1
United Kingdom9,495 contributions
Jun 2022
Walking up Capitoline Hill is an excellent way to see a lot of ancient Rome but you need to have a bit of time up your sleeve. It’s only a short walk but it is a steady uphill climb and there are a lot of sights along the way.
i) We started from the Vittorio Emanuele II Monument. There are a number of ways you can take but we found that this was a good starting point. First, we went up the stairs to watch the changing of the guards at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and to take in the panoramic view from the balcony terrace level.
ii) From here, we followed the road to the right of the Monument which took us uphill, along the outside walls of the Roman Forum.
iii) We stopped at the Mamertine Prison where we had excellent views down over the Forum, the Temple of Saturn and the triumphal arch of Septimius Severus. This can all be seen from the elevated roadside so you don’t actually have to enter the Forum.
iv) The highlight however is when you reach Michelangelo’s Piazza del Campidoglio at the top of the Capitoline Hill. This whole piazza was and its surrounds were designed by Michelangelo in 1536. A central statue of Marcus Aurelius (the only bronze equestrian statue to have survived from the classical era) is encircled by the three grand palazzi that make up the Capitoline Museums. Even without going into the Capitoline Museums, there is a lot to see here. It’s packed with historically significant statues including the famous she-wolf suckling the twins Romulus and Remus. A monumental staircase, designed by Michelangelo for the triumphal entry of Charles V in 1536, is flanked by prominent statues of the twins, Castor and Pollux, the children of Zeus. At the bottom are two black ancient Egyptian lion fountains.
v) On the way back down, we walked out behind the Palazzo Senatorio, passing under the small but picturesque covered bridge, that looks much like a Roman version of the 'Bridge of Sighs’. A short way past this, was a large open ‘balcony’ area that looks down over length of the Roman Forum. Here we had a panoramic outlook and again, we could see a lot of the Forum without having to go inside.
Overall, if you have the time, this is a brilliant walk that packs in a lot of sight-seeing.
Written February 5, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

BradJill
Hong Kong, China159,629 contributions
Mar 2015 • Couples
Capitoline Hill is one of the seven hills of city city of Rome, situated to the northeast of Palatine Hill and the Roman Forum. It was the citadel during early Roman times, and is now covered by Medieval and Renaissance period palaces and piazza.

This is where you can find the Capitoline Museum, which houses fine art, an incredible collection of sculptures and other early Roman artefacts. The museum is located within the Palazzo Nuovo and Palazzo dei Conservatori.

A nice way to walk up the Capitoline Hill is the Cordonata, a sloping ramp which allows a slow, leisurely ascend up the hill. The pathway includes impressive statues of Egyptian lions at the base as well as colossal figures of twins Castor and Pollux at the top.

You can also see a nice replica Equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius in the centre of Piazza del Campidoglio as well as a replica of the bronze She-Wolf statue on the side of Palazzo del Senatore, near the way down to the Roman Forum.

Note: You can easily combine visits to attractions at Capitoline Hill with a visit to the Victor Emmanuel Monument complex at nearby Piazza Venezia or along with a visit to the collection visit to the Roman Forum, Palatine Hill and Colosseo.
Written June 2, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

TightLine2
Northbrook, IL142 contributions
Nov 2014 • Friends
This is where you go to marvel at up close all those amazing things you've seen in the coffee-table books about Rome. Marcus Aurelius astride a magnificent stallion; the Dying Gaul; Romulus and Remus suckling the She-Wolf; Bacchus; Medusa . . . it's a jaw-dropping collection of sculpture from antiquity. And there's more, in every nook and cranny. Big tip: the museum is on many levels, ranging out in different directions . . . some of the best is in gallery under the plaza . . . so study a map of the galleries carefully before starting out, and keep a map with you. It can be a bit bewildering.
Written December 2, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

4Firmies
Sydney, Australia83 contributions
May 2015 • Couples
A lovely way to start exploring Rome for first timers. The square is nice to sit and soak in the history even if you don't want to spend the money to enter the museums. There are great views over the Roman Forum at the rear. We bought a Roma Pass which got us into any two museums and all archeological sites plus public transport for three days for Euro36. It was €15 to get into the Capitoline museums on their own. Lots of ancient statues and some paintings. Don't bother with the audio guide - it was €5 and while the info was interesting, the numbers were poorly marked and difficult to locate on the map. Nice cafeteria (panninis, pizza and insalata) with a view over the city rooftops - we thought that the Serviced tables were worth the outlook and there were Very few tables for the self service.
Written May 15, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

ahabbas37
Tel Aviv, Israel8 contributions
Apr 2015 • Family
This is my second day in Rome, and I've visited many attractions, and so far, I liked this one the most, it's magnificent ! you have to climb many stairs though, but it's totally worth it, because from the top, the view is amazing ! from up there you can see ruins of and old city (Roman Forum maybe, not sure) and Coleseu, the view is amazing ! and even when you're this high, you can pay 3€ to use an to go up higher (much much higher) ! and from up there you literally can see all of Rome !! left me speechless.
Certainly a must in Rome, I highly recommend it.
Written April 8, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

traveltoforeignlands
San Diego, CA583 contributions
Jul 2015 • Friends
The picture shows the backs of the Dioscuri which are at the top of the stairway which was also created by Michelangelo. What I also positively loved about the piazza here is that it housed the statue of Romulus and Remus feeding on the she-wolf that legend says cared for and nurtured the twins in a cave on the Palatine not far from the Capitoline. Also, I viewed one of my favorite fountains here. It is positively HUGE AND BEAUTIFUL! The center sculpture is that of Dea Minerva (goddess Minerva) and she is flanked on both sides by sculptures of HUGE river gods. I discovered that throughout Rome, sculptures of river gods all look like magnificent male giants! This magnificent 3-sculpture fountain is located immediately in front of the Tabularium on the Capitoline. I was amazed to see how many wonderful sights one could see and photograph in Rome all for free. Though I have been fortunate to travel to many distant lands, Rome will always be one of the most special places on Earth for me! :)
Written October 22, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

fe d
manchester211 contributions
Wonderful views stunning garden walks lots to see. My absolute favorite place in rome. Gives you the best view of the colosseum.
Written November 15, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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