Chiesa di San Giovanni della Malva

Chiesa di San Giovanni della Malva

Chiesa di San Giovanni della Malva
3.5
What people are saying
Small hidden church. Due also to its locationi in a vibrant neighborhood, it deserves a visit.
3.0 of 5 bubblesSep 2019
This small church is very close to Porta Settimiana. What we see today is nothing but a reconstruction of the old church from the 1800s, after Pope Sixtus IV had it demolished because it was too shabby and crumbling. However, the historical origins of this church are quite ancient, dating back to the Middle Ages around 1100. The church is completely neglected by the tour operators and it is not on the classic tourism maps. Eventualy it may be interesting for hidden gems and ancient art hunters and lovers that prefers the secret and unconventional Rome, and that only a careful and curious eye can be able to catch! This ancient church has three naves on a Greek cross layout. It was listed in the catalogues of the churches in Rome of 1119 with the name of St. John at Gianicolo, which changed the name to St. John of Malva perhaps due to the dense presence of mallow plants in that area, or maybe due to the corruption of the word “mica aura”, the yellowish clay which looks like gold, in the Janiculum slopes, where the church is placed. It is dedicated to St. John the Baptist and to St. John the Evangelist and a relief with the tho saints is on the church’s façade. Also, the church of St. John of Malva is listed among the places of Camillians, who lived there until 1870 to assist the sick and the sick of the parishes nearby Santa Maria in Trastevere and St. Dorotea. The 'house' at St. John of Malva was opened by Camillians in 1714. Due to a violent earthquake, it was destroyed in 1811. In 1842, Fr. Luigi Togni managed to get a large sum from Duchess Anna Londei Grazioli to be used for the reconstruction of the whole complex from the foundations with architect Giacomo Monaldi. The Duchess is remembered in an inscription placed in memory of the restoration of the church, which was reopened in 1851. It is the first church in Italy devoted to the Albanian ethnic community. Due also to its location and the lovely and lively neighborhood (Trastevere) in which it is located, it is certainly worth a visit!

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Neighborhood: Centro

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

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3.5
3.5 of 5 bubbles6 reviews
Excellent
1
Very good
2
Average
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The_Gilpins
Castlebar, Ireland1,365 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2019 • Couples
Our first step over the threshold of a church in Rome and we were not dissapointed.
As soon as you enter you can fail to be impressed. Beautiful.
Written April 12, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

dapper777
Monaco63,854 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2019 • Friends
This small church is very close to Porta Settimiana.
What we see today is nothing but a reconstruction of the old church from the 1800s, after Pope Sixtus IV had it demolished because it was too shabby and crumbling.
However, the historical origins of this church are quite ancient, dating back to the Middle Ages around 1100.
The church is completely neglected by the tour operators and it is not on the classic tourism maps.
Eventualy it may be interesting for hidden gems and ancient art hunters and lovers that prefers the secret and unconventional Rome, and that only a careful and curious eye can be able to catch!
This ancient church has three naves on a Greek cross layout.
It was listed in the catalogues of the churches in Rome of 1119 with the name of St. John at Gianicolo, which changed the name to St. John of Malva perhaps due to the dense presence of mallow plants in that area, or maybe due to the corruption of the word “mica aura”, the yellowish clay which looks like gold, in the Janiculum slopes, where the church is placed.
It is dedicated to St. John the Baptist and to St. John the Evangelist and a relief with the tho saints is on the church’s façade.
Also, the church of St. John of Malva is listed among the places of Camillians, who lived there until 1870 to assist the sick and the sick of the parishes nearby Santa Maria in Trastevere and St. Dorotea.
The 'house' at St. John of Malva was opened by Camillians in 1714.
Due to a violent earthquake, it was destroyed in 1811. In 1842, Fr. Luigi Togni managed to get a large sum from Duchess Anna Londei Grazioli to be used for the reconstruction of the whole complex from the foundations with architect Giacomo Monaldi.
The Duchess is remembered in an inscription placed in memory of the restoration of the church, which was reopened in 1851.
It is the first church in Italy devoted to the Albanian ethnic community.
Due also to its location and the lovely and lively neighborhood (Trastevere) in which it is located, it is certainly worth a visit!
Written April 23, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

phat_dawg_21
Alpharetta, GA15,050 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2019 • Couples
We found a suggested itinerary for a walking tour of Trastevere on line, and this 19th century devotional church was one of the points of interest. Compared to many of the other churches on the tour, it was unremarkable inside and out, but it does have some history.

The original church was built in 1123 and revised in 1475 when Ponte Sisto was opened. It was further revised 1641.

It fell into decay and was demolished in the 18th century, and rebuilt as you see it today in 1851.
Written May 1, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

fssutton1
Charleston, SC852 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2018 • Couples
We thought this was a grand Church. Probably the cleanest most preserved church we have been into in Italy. Beautiful interior along with more than average exterior. If you are into Italian churches then I would go out of my way to visit this one.
Written May 29, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
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Chiesa di San Giovanni della Malva - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (2024)

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