Tempio Maggiore di Roma
Tempio Maggiore di Roma
4.5
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Duration: 1-2 hours
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Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

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4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles64 reviews
Excellent
37
Very good
19
Average
4
Poor
1
Terrible
3

Lorenzo
Rome, Italy77 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2020 • Solo
It s a pity having to pay to enter a religious building. You're forced to visit also the museum so full price is 11€ and you cannvisit the synagogue. But you can't visit the synagogue for free. Imagine having to pay to enter st. Peter basilica. After I noticed I had to pay to enter a religious building I chose not to enter.
Written June 25, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

YallahBye
1 contribution
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2020 • Family
This was a horrible experience!!! The members of this synagogue do not want visitors and we were made to feel very uncomfortable in a way I have never experienced anywhere else in the world. This was especially disturbing since we had just come from seeing Auschwitz the week before and wanted to be part of a Jewish community after that. Faced with an unfriendly environment that included judgement about our Judaism, I would recommend strongly to avoid visiting this museum and synagogue!!
Written January 17, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Susan R
San Francisco, CA144 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2020
Completed in 1904, the synagoga was built after the Jewish Ghetto (est in 15555 by thw papacy) in Rome was demolished in 1888. The vestiges and ruins of the ghetto are intact. The Jewish Museum of Rome is in the synagogue which is a combination of schools of architecture. I I walked from Trevi fountain to find the ghetto and to tour the museum and walk the streets and learn the history ...which goes back to the 2nd Century BC. A large number of Jews were brought to Rome as Slaves from ancient Judea.
Written February 29, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Malgorzata
12,086 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2019
Great Synagogue is the main synagogue in Rome. It was built in 1901–1904 on one of four plots obtained as a result of demolition of the most damaged areas of the ghetto . The synagogue, from a strictly architectural point of view, is really fabulous. Designed by Vincenzo Costa and Osvaldo Armanni . It contains elements of Assyrian-Babylonian, Egyptian and Greco-Roman architecture. The eclectic style of the building makes it stand out in a city .The interior of the synagogue is lavishly decorated in the Art Nouveau style. The aluminium dome is the only square dome in the city . One of the greatest synagogues in Europe.
Written April 23, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Noraatc
Sudbury, MA38,683 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2023 • Solo
The Great Synagogue and Museo Ebraico (ticket is 11€) is located near Teatro Marcello. It was my second time touring it and I was even more impressed than before. The ticket includes a short guided tour in English and Italian.

The synagogue is huge and absolutely magnificent. It is not too old though; it was built in 1904… a “baby” by the standards of Roma Vecchia. The museum has beautiful ritual objects on display, Torah scrolls, gorgeous silver candlesticks, menorahs, textiles, etc.

I was very happy to see more and more people interested in the Jewish history and tragic fate of the Roman Jews perished in the Holocaust. There were many non-Jewish families with kids and even a group of nuns.
Written January 31, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Mairwen1
United Kingdom10,920 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2022
This is the largest synagogue in Rome and is one of the main sights in the historic Jewish Ghetto area.
The synagogue stands alongside the Tiber River. Built in 1904, it’s an imposing and easily spotted building with a distinctive and unusual square dome.
For over 300 years, the Jewish community was segregated behind walls in the Ghetto area, subjected to discriminatory laws and curfews. They had access to several small synagogues but nothing like this grand building.
It was only after the unification of Italy that the walls were physically torn down and a synagogue on this scale was able to be built.
It's hard to imagine the symbolic significance of the synagogue when it was first built.
In 1986 Pope John Paul II visited the synagogue, to build relationships with the Jewish community. There is only just over 3km between the Synagogue and the Vatican but it was the first time a Pope had entered. In fact it was the first time a Pope had entered any synagogue, anywhere. Apparently when the Pope and the Chief Rabbi embraced, a thousand onlookers wept.
We didn’t have time to go inside but the basement also houses the Jewish Museum and a small synagogue known as the Spanish Temple.
NOTE: Several other interesting and free sights are within very close walking distance. These include the ancient Roman ruins (the Portico D’Ottavia and Teatro Marcello), the charming Turtle Fountain and Rome’s oldest bridge which leads across to the small, boat-shaped, Tiber Island.
Written February 11, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Joseph
New York City, NY46 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2023
The Synagogue is something you cant skip if you truly want to have a rounded experience of the history of Rome. its located in the heart of the "Jewish Ghetto" and its a true work of art. The Gabba of the synagogue is not overly fond of Ashkenazim but the actual building is truly beautiful i never saw such a synagogue even in Israel.
Written February 17, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Jonas T
1 contribution
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2021 • Couples
The synagogue was quite beautiful but unfortunately I have never felt this unwelcome by a tour guide. Unenthusiastic, rude and barely gave us five minutes to walk around and see the place. Terrible use of 11€.
Written October 29, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

BosBcnBlq
Bologna, Italy10 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2020
The “Tempio Maggiore di Roma” is one of the lesser known landmarks of Rome and Italy.
Did you know that Jews are the oldest continues group to inhabit Rome, predating Christianity!

This Synagogue was built after the reunification of Italy, and more than just the importance for the Jewish Community, it is a representation the end of the internal fights between the Papal States control over the inhabitants of Rome, and foreign Monarchs and the beginning of the modern nation of Italy composed on citizens of this multicultural peninsula.
The Jewish Museum housed below the Synagogue shows how the Jewish community has been able to maintain their culture and traditions in spite of the Papal States bigotry, racism, and limited access to employment.
It is also a museum to the Jewish people and religion and how they have coped through the centuries.
In the 1800’s before the opening of the Ghetto by the Italian unification forces composed of the Garibaldian and Piedmont forces, The Jews of Ghetto lived in deep poverty, but by holding onto their religious and cultural tradition there were no illiterate Jew in Ghetto, they could all read and write. Meanwhile illiteracy was rampant in the rest of Rome, Italy and Europe. The strive to live and survive has never left.
Make sure to visit the Synagogue as well as it is unique, different from the churches of Rome, and different from most Synagogues in the rest of the world. It is beautiful, grand. Hey, we are still in Italy!
Once done, make sure to try the Judeo-Romanesco (Jewish Roman Cuisine) food which is famous among Italians.
Written August 12, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Jeff C
New York City, NY22 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2019 • Friends
Great museum and synagogue tour. A must visit to understand the ancient contribution of Jews in Rome, the segregation of Jews through the 1880s, their suffering during WWII, and the reconciliation with the Popes starting in the 1980s. Very few places in Rome even mention WWII, but here you see courage from a constantly targeted population. The synagogue is uniquely beautiful, even if it is hard to understand the separation of men (prime seats) and women (sides and balcony behind fencing) required by Orthodox beliefs. The synagogue, however, is a tribute to the persistent of the Jewish population in Rome.
Written October 5, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Tempio Maggiore di Roma - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (2024)

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