House of Augustus
House of Augustus
4.5
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Neighborhood: Campitelli
How to get there
  • Fori Imperiali-Colosseo • 8 min walk
  • Colosseo • 8 min walk
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4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles193 reviews
Excellent
109
Very good
59
Average
21
Poor
2
Terrible
2

Shana K
Clemmons, NC107 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2022
I’d give five stars but the presentation is very creepy. First you have to wait in a certain area outside. They yell at you if you stand or wait a few steps away, doesn’t matter if bugs are biting in the shade. They were really bad! There’s really only a limited seating area. When you walk in a curtain lowers and audio starts. This is a walking tour of sorts. It’s very dark except for dimly lit areas. You have to follow the audio as it only has certain areas lit and it forces you to move quickly. There’s no looking at your pace and if you’re in a larger group and cannot see, that’s too bad for you. The lights only illuminated what you are supposed to see at that moment during the audio presentation. And the guards, I mean guides…have no knowledge, like when was this constructed, when was it excavated, etc. They were extremely rude. There is a lot to see, and the restored walls are amazing, but I give only a “3” rating because of the entire experience. I see that there may be ways to get in with a tour guide, that might be a better option. We just had the day pass for Forum, Palatine, and coliseum. I was there Sunday, Oct 23, 2022 in the afternoon. *side note about the day pass. We purchased ours online, but the QR code didn’t list that this was included in our pass. I showed them at the gate up by the entrance, and it was confirmed that we could take the tour.
Written November 3, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

serhanozel
Alanya, Türkiye1,103 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2019
another place you will be impressed too much. I think some of the parts was not cleared or missed. visit do not hasitate.
Written September 27, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

SelbyDale
Saint Paul, MN208 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2018 • Couples
Finally we were able to tour inside the House of Augustus and the House of Livia on the Palatine Hill after many years of trying to book. It is thrilling to see the frescoes and to just be in the space that holds such history including visits from Michelangelo. The visit includes a new laser show.

Here is how to see this site: Coop Culture has recently introduced the Biglietto S.U.P.E.R for 18€. It can be purchased on-line or by phone. I called Coop Culture on another matter and fortunately was told that this ticket had just been introduced and that it allowed access to seven sites that can only be visited with the ticket.

These sites are: Criptoportico Neroniano, Museo Palatino, Aula Isiaca-Loggia Mattei, Casa di Augusto, Casa di Livia, Tempio di Romolo and Santa Maria Antiqua. Each site has specific days and times that it is open.

You buy the S.U.P.E.R. ticket and then you must make a reservation for a timed tour in English (if that is your preference) for the House of Augustus and for the House of Livia. For Criptoportico Neroniano, Museo Palatino and Aula Isiaca-Loggia Mattei you do not need to make a reservation--just go to the site. The Tempio di Romolo and Santa Maria Antiqua were not open when we were there so I do not know the particulars for these sites.

You cannot use your S.U.P.E.R. ticket at the House of Augustus and the House of Livia without a reservation. You will be turned away even if the tour is not full.

Calling Coop Culture is easy as there is an option to order in English. I did not use the on-line system so cannot speak to this method.

In Rome you must enter at via di San Gregorio 30 (the Palatine entrance) to exchange your reservation for a ticket, but you will need your reservation info because it shows the times of your bookings. Allow plenty of time to go through security and to find the site. Look for the number of the site (3 Casa di Augusto and 4 Casa di Livia) and ask along the way. It is not easy to find and takes more time than you may think.

Lastly, make sure you know where the exits are. This has changed with the new security features. On the Palatine Hill the exit is different from the entrance.
Written May 30, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

jonathantweed
usa110 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2014 • Couples
By paying a 3 euro surcharge on top of the 12 euro general admission ticket to The Forum and Coliseum, you gain access to the houses of Augustus and Livia.

The best way to do this is to buy your tickets at the Arch of Titus entrance to the Forum. Then, enter the Forum at the Arch of Titus, just after you enter on the right is the meeting point where a Forum attendant escorts a maximum of 20 visitors to the apartments for a 15 minute visit. When you buy the Augusta/Livia tickets, available from 9 30a to 2 30p only, you will receive a sticker indicating your appointed time which should be worn on your clothing and visible to the attendants. Please note that you cannot buy the special ticket for Livia and Augustus' apartments once you're inside the Forum, and we are not aware of anywhere online where they can be purchased in advance. While there is a lot of info about the apartments online, there is surprisingly little information about how to arrange to visit them, hence our detailed post.

We arrived at 12:00pm and were given an appointment for 12:15pm so we stayed near the entrance and waited for the attendant to collect us and some other visitors. You should also note that this is a visit and not a tour - the guide is only there to escort you to the site, they aren't going to explain anything to you.

Once you climb the hill and get to the rooms, they are very interesting to see - it is incredible to think that the frescoes have survived for so long, and amazing to walk through the rooms that the rulers of the ancient world walked through. You'll see Augustus's rooms first and will then be led to see Livia's quarters. The signage is in Italian and English and actually quite good (here and throughout the forum) with detailed descriptions of all of the interesting parts of the apartments.

This is an extraordinary glimpse into what Roman imperial living quarters were really like and definitely worth the price of admission....especially if you have ever watched the brilliant I CLAUDIUS 1976 BBC mini series.
Written November 28, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Karl P
Narrabeen, New South Wales, Australia55 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2016 • Solo
Situated on the Palatine Hill,where the "big wigs" lived is this wonderful place to experience.Get your tickets at the booth in Via Di S.Gregorio, near the Arch of Constantine,as this is the only place giving access to Augustus house plus the rest of the sites.It costs only 4 euros [great value] but you have to ask for it as its not advertised.Also,cards only,no cash at this booth.You get a sticker showing a time to be under the olive trees for a guide to lead you.Its not a "Guided" tour but doesnt have to be because you will see it all at leisure.Dont waste money with a specialised guided tour,and enjoy the history of how this first of the Emperors lived.
Written May 22, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Gooner10-8
Dublin, Ireland1,976 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2018 • Couples
We're quite interested in the history of Ancient Rome, and on this, our second visit to that wonderfully excavated area, "The Roman Forum", we were absolutely delighted with our visit to this wonderful venue.

Augustus, as we understand it, was the first to be officially designated "Emperor" of the Roman Empire, for all that several Roman Leaders who came before him may now, mistakenly, be referred to in a similar way.

One of the most renowned of those Leaders, Julius Caesar, played an enormous part, in life and in death, in the rise of the man now remembered as Caesar Augustus. Octavian (Octavianus), as he was then, was a grand-nephew of Julius Caesar, and when the latter was assassinated in 44 B.C., was named in his will as his adopted Son and Heir.

This lead to the formation of a ruling "Triumvirate" of military dictators : Octavian, Mark Antony & Marcus Lepidus. Put simply, they co-operated successfully in defeating Julius Caesar's assassins, but, perhaps inevitably, ambition gradually divided them.: Lepidus was driven into exile, and Antony committed suicide, having been defeated in battle by Octavian, in 31 B.C.

Octavian - as "last man standing" - gradually manipulated and exploited the complex, jealous & argumentative power structures in Rome, over a period of years, to become sole Ruler ("Princeps Civitatis" : First Citizen), leading to what was known as the "Principate" : the first phase of what we now refer to as the Roman Empire.

Now Caesar Augustus, he reigned as undisputed Emperor from 27 B.C. until 14 A.D., significantly expanding the Empire,developing its physical infrastructure, reforming taxation and dramatically rebuilding the City of Rome itself. He died - probably of natural causes - at the (then) advanced age of 75, to be succeeded by his adopted Son, Tiberius.

Now, back to this House. The Palatine Hill, associated as it was/is with the Romulus & Remus myths, was highly-regarded as a most desirable and prestigious place to live, and the ambitious Octavian/Augustus, not surprisingly, developed his residence here.

After many long years of excavation, what you can see now is an impressively restored venue, which, within a tastefully-constructed Visitor Centre, and using imaginative audio-visual techniques, offers an exciting insight into what the Home of this fascinating Man was like, thousands of years ago.

We came here on a private guided Tour, with a designated time-slot, and were utterly charmed by what we experienced. Starting with an introductory video input, we gradually progressed around the re-constructed building, guided throughout by audio commentary,and fascinated by the clever use of laser technology to help us imagine what he couldn't actually see.

What we could, and did see was all the more impressive : the layout of the original House, the apparent function of each of the Sections/Rooms, and, above all, the stunningly colourful & beautiful Frescoes/Murals. [The site, by the way, is under the direct control of local staff (limiting immediate direct inputs from private Guides), but the extremely professional audio-visual commentary is more than adequate, and the staff themselves are both friendly and helpful]].

We regard our visit here as the "Highlight" of our now, two visits to this historic area of Ancient Rome - and saying that is no reflection on the many other absolutely fascinating features of "The Roman Forum", nor, indeed, on the valued insights of our paid Guides.

Obviously, we highly recommend!
Written June 7, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Loretta R
Hermosa Beach, CA394 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2012 • Friends
While access to the interior of Augustus’ house is limited, it’s still exciting to see the exterior. So, if you are visiting the Palatine Hills, be sure to stop by Augustus’ house. If you peak through some of the ruins, you will be able to get glimpses of the interior and you might actually get lucky and be allowed access inside. At the end of the house, down the hill a little is a FANTASTIC view of Rome. Gorgeous photo-op spot. Augustus clearly chose this location for his house in order to see all the wonders of his city from a bird’s eye-view. You’ll not only get an excellent view of the Forum ruins below, but also St. Peter’s Dome rises in the distance. Beautiful!

Next to Augustus’ house is the house of his wife, Livia. So, check that out, too. It’s easier to see the layout of her house from the path that crosses above her house’s ruins. And I just love that the emperor designed a His and Hers palace.

Concerning the rest of the Palatine Hill. It is fascinating! While it's a bit of a hike to get to the top of the hill, once you're on top, the walks are very easy and the ruins are worth a leisurely stroll. There aren't any concession stands on the property, so bring your own water. There are also few sitting areas, but there are many shady spots where you can relax. Many people were picnicking on these shady grassy areas when I visited. So if you are a non-athletic traveler or simply would like to take it easy, the Palatine Hill can accommodate that after you get to the top.

If you don't need a leisurely day and want to take-on the hill without breaks, you should be able to see everything in 1.5 hours. Just be sure to bring a map since the ticket office doesn't hand out any and the direction signs on the property simply are WRONG! They will point you to the Forum entrance and you will find yourself elsewhere, repeatedly. However, if you come without a map, there are still plenty of visual landmarks to guide you, chiefly being the stadium.

The stadium is a must see. Supposedly St. Sebastian was martyred at the stadium and there's a big bloom of beautiful purple flowers growing in the area, at least in May/June. Also a must-see is the Cryptoporticus. The Cryptoporticus is a series of tunnels that the emperors would use to get around the city without being seen or exposing themselves to the threat of crowds. Despite the safety purpose of the Cryptoporticus, in one of these tunnels, Emperor Caligula was assassinated. I was a little hesitant to walk through these tunnels--fear of the potential creepiness, cave-ins, and claustrophobia, but the land around the tunnels has been dug up, so there's a reassuring blast of sunlight at the end of each tunnel. Also the tunnels are amazingly sturdy and preserved; you can even find some great ancient reliefs and carvings inside them. These are definitely worth seeing!

If you plan on seeing the Coliseum, Palatine Hill & Forum in one day, I'd advise that you visit in the order listed. After seeing the Coliseum, you'll exit behind the Arch of Constantine. Don't go back to the Via dei Fori Imperiali, which you'd likely take to access the Coliseum. Instead, take the road to the left of the Coliseum exit (Via San Gregorio) and go upwards to the lesser known entrance of the Palatine Hill. There should be either no line there or a very tiny one. When you are finished with the Palatine Hill, you can enter the Forum directly without reentering any lines outside. Go down the ankle-twisting original stone path carefully! You'll be facing in the direction of the Coliseum on this path and enter the Forum by the Arch of Titus.

I booked my online reservations through OmniTicket before my trip: the Coliseum, Forum, and Palatine Hill three-in-one ticket. It cost 13.50 Euro per ticket for all three sites and no wait in line. There's no signs or separate entry area for the three-in-one ticket, so just go to the area designated for the Roma Pass, raise up your printed-out ticket, and the guards will let you in.
Written August 5, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

SANTraveler8
Encinitas, CA277 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2014 • Couples
We tried 3 times to get to see this site again--we saw what was then mistakenly labelled "Livia's House" in 1998 and is now known to be Augustus's house with Livia's next door through the huge library rooms. First time a wildcat strike by public workers closed it before we could get in. Second time we went on a Sunday and it closed early before we could go to it. Finally, we made it and are we glad we did. The frescoes are amazing--if you want a feel for what wealthy Roman villas were like this is the place. In order to preserve the site, they are only letting in small groups a few times/day. We got in at the 12:15pm visit. But, and this is important--get your tickets below when you buy the entrance to the Palatine Hill. They do NOT sell tickets at the entrance. I can't tell you how many people arrived to try to get into it while we were waiting for our time, and were turned away because they had not purchased tickets below at the entrance to the Hill. But it is worth it--you get to see these structures with few people unlike most other sites in Rome. Be aware though that the labelling of "Augustus' House" and 'Livia's House" may not be completely accurate--some sources believe they did not live separately but rather that the place labelled "Livia's House" may have been their public reception areas. In any case, worth seeing.
Written December 7, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Anselm1956
London, UK83 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2016 • Friends
Visiting Rome with my 85 year old former landlord, a native obsessed with classical history (we stayed in his childhood flat, now the via Capo d'Africa 4 Bed & Breakfast - how much of a coincidence is that?) I was determined to get him into the House of Augustus and the House of Livia. It wasn't easy. The website shows, guide books say, and the Tourist Office repeat that you have to ring a number to book; but when you ring, you're told to go to the ticket office at the Colosseum end of the Forum. When I did this I was told to ring the number and when I said I had and was told to go to the ticket office I was told not to tell the clerk his job! I was persistent, returning the following morning and that time spoke with the woman heading the queue who knew exactly what to do!

We had an accompanied tour with a delightful and well informed guide, Laura. I preferred this to a full guided tour as I had an excellent guide book. Laura provided a good balance, answering questions and volunteering information but was never intrusive.

The house itself was just fascinating and the wall paintings, tiles and pipes made the place alive for me so much more than broken stones and statues. The complex was larger than I had imagined and in a better state of preservation.
Written May 4, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

BradJill
Hong Kong, China159,680 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2015 • Couples
The House of Augustus (Domus Augusti) is one of the ancient Roman buildings you can visit upon Palatine Hill. Make sure to not confuse this with the much larger Domus Augustana on the other end of Palatine Hill.

This was one of the residences of Caesar August during his reign 27 BC to 14 AD. It is most known today for the lovely frescos found upon its inside walls. Do note that visitations are highly managed and limited to only a handful of visitors at a time. As such, you might want to try and get there as early as possible in order to avoid queues for getting inside.

In the end, there is much to see at Palatine Hill but this is one of the more impressive and memorable attractions, definitely worth trying to see when you visit.

Tip: As an alternative, if a visit to the House of Augustus doesn't work out, you may want to consider visiting National Roman Museum - Palazzo Massimo alle Terme, where you will find many Roman wall frescos on display, including an entire room known as The Painted Garden of the Villa of Livia, which was excavated and moved here.

Note: Palatine Hill is open from 8.30am to 7.15pm (winter) and 7.30pm (summer). Entry price is €12 per person (+€2 if reserved online) and includes entry into the Colosseum and Roman Forum.
Written May 17, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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