Porta Settimiana
Porta Settimiana
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The area
Neighborhood: Trastevere
Trastevere ("beyond the Tiber") is like a faded postcard, a little worn around the edges but still charming. With its wide-open piazzas, meandering streets, weathered Renaissance buildings, and overgrown personality, it's become an irresistible mecca for visitors. Trastevere is an enclave of entertainment - a rotating set of street performers entertains almost every night, and unforgettable eateries and bars pepper its piazzas and side streets. For a trip to the past, visit the southern and western flanks of Trastevere for pockets of yesteryear, less traversed areas with a residual 1960s and 70s Roman vibe.

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.


4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles24 reviews
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6
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dapper777
Monaco63,498 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2021 • Friends
Porta Settimiana is the northern gate of that triangle that included the Trastevere district within the Aurelian Walls.
"Porta Septimiana", this is its ancient name, was built by Septimius Severus on the "Horti Getae", that is, on the gardens of Septimius Geta, son of Septimius Severus and brother of the Emperor Caracalla.
The current gate was rebuilt, with its characteristic Ghibelline battlements, by Pope Alexander VI of the Borgia family in 1498 and marks the beginning of via della Lungara.
On both sides of the gate, you can see the remains of sacred shrines.
On the side of Via di Porta Settimiana
there is the sacred aedicule that depicts Jesus praying in the Garden of Olives, from the 16th century, but the frescoe is very damaged and barely distinguishable.
On the side of via della Lungara,
the sacred aedicule, now completely degraded, had a painting of the Holy Family from the sixteenth century.
What is left is only the rusty and broken frame, and the frescoe has been gone for a long time.
If you really want to, and if you are close, you can take selfies.
Written September 15, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Brad
Hong Kong, China173,427 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2024 • Family
This was originally a 3rd-century gate that once formed part of the Aurelian Wall located along Via della Lungara in Trastevere. It was the only remaining gate on this side of the Tiber River and was remodelled and rebuilt several times erasing all traces of its original construction.

What you see today is a remnant of the 1498 rebuild by order of Pope Alexander VI. The Ghibelline battlements with swallowtail top was part of that gate reconstruction. You can walk through the gate along Via della Lungara, it is an interesting link to Ancient Rome to see while exploring Trastevere.
Written April 26, 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Malgorzata
12,091 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2019
Porta Settimiana is one of the many gates built in the Aurelian Wall. The gate has very ancient roots, dated to the first centuries AD. It played a protective and access role in the city. The current appearance, results from the renovation carried out in 1498. The gate very characteristic , isin a Trastevere district. Worth a visit if you are nearby.
Written April 19, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

phat_dawg_21
Alpharetta, GA15,050 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2019 • Couples
It was originally built in the 3rd century when it was a vital link in the Roman defenses of the city. Much of its current appearance dates from the age of the Renaissance popes, who retained it as a site marking the edge of the ancient Aurelian wall.

The gate was rebuilt in 1498 by Pope Alexander VI in its current form. It is named Porta Settimiana after Septimius Severus. Since a parallel road carries most of the traffic, the gate has not needed enlargement and appears today as it was built in 1498.
Written May 1, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

JnVSydney
Greater Sydney, Australia20,867 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2018 • Couples
Whilst walking the streets of the eternal city there is so much to see at times it get overwhelming. We stumbled upon this beautiful gate on our way to Palazzo Corsini, on free open day. Built in the 3rd century, worth a visit especially for history buffs *Ancient Rome*
Written February 7, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Neil K
Liverpool, UK831,000 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2017 • Friends
As we were walking from Caffe Lungana 1940 in the Trastevere district through to T Bone Station and we passed through this interesting looking old gate way.
In a city with many hidden gems this was another fine find and on doing a bit of googling I found out it was one of the gates to the Aurelian walls in Rome.
To me it just adds to the mystic of this city that even just walking around you can come across such a piece of history.
Very easy to locate walking down Via a Della Lungara towards Porte Sisto in the Trastevere district .
Well worth checking out.
Written May 21, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Raintree_Thailand
Bangkok, Thailand4,080 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2016 • Solo
Another unexpected feature of Trastevere to stumble upon. Found the gate when walking about without a clear destination.
Written July 24, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
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Porta Settimiana - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (2024)

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