Chiesa San Pietro a Corte
Chiesa San Pietro a Corte
4.5

Top ways to experience Chiesa San Pietro a Corte and nearby attractions

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Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.


4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles147 reviews
Excellent
93
Very good
44
Average
7
Poor
1
Terrible
2

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Jackie C
Peterborough, UK475 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2020
We stumbled upon this by accident. Were geo caching in the area and visited. A beautiful old church there is an information sheet to read inside about the history. There is also a separate area to visit which shows you some beautiful wall painting or frescoes underneath the church
Written April 10, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

SuzanneLG
Gresham, OR842 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2023 • Couples
This is the best representation, a baroque art outside of Switzerland.
I would never of known when I walked in this church What I would’ve seen underneath the main level. It was breathtaking.
If you’re ever in Salerno Italy, You cannot miss coming to see this treasure.
Written September 16, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Artist-Journey
Madison, AL77 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2019
My travel policy: whenever I am walking by and find a church open -- I go in. One never knows when it will be open again. On a Sunday I was fortunate enough to find the door open, so I went in. There was a volunteer guide, and she gave me an insider's view of the architecture and explained the history. As other reviewer's wrote, this was originally a palace for the Longobardi ruler -- there is a wonderful book for sale that shows the floor plans and photos which help to explain the transformation of an ancient 8th C. palace into the present day church. It is a fascinating story. My review can only add on to others' reviews. Worth a visit.
Written September 28, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

vessi80
North Lanarkshire, UK1,080 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2018 • Solo
On a very rainy Tuesday, I found this beautiful medieval church and was totally entranced. The girl at the tourist office told me that Saturdays and Sundays are better times to visit as there is an excellent VR display . She was right.
My second visit was on a Saturday morning and the wonderful guy on duty gave me directions to the marvellous Santa Maria de Lama church with the crypt and frescoes. He told me to return at 11.30 and what a treat was in store. A wonderful floor show (English version) of light and sound and information on the history of this church and its importance to the people of Salerno !
Entrance free.
Written May 27, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

annamaria2470
Salerno, Italy322 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2015
this medioeval church was builded on ancient latin temple. there you may visit also a roman spa.it isn't always open, you must check the schedule
Written June 7, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Oldjack
Greater Melbourne, Australia27,951 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2019 • Couples
This interesting old church is claimed to be one of the most significant Lombard period buildings in the town and goes back to 787 when Prince Arechi II moved to Salerno and set up shop there.The church which has seen modifocations over the years was built on ancient Roman Baths that go back to the 3rd century and there is access to see the ruins below the church.Well worth a visit.
Written June 2, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Terry S
Green Valley, AZ1,345 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2017
The history of this site is incredible. There is a well-done video projected on the lower medieval level in English and available also in other languages. The archaeological part of this site is great, Admission is free but donations are welcome.
Written August 20, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

NYCAffiliate
Milan, Italy15 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2023 • Couples
The monumental complex of S. Peter at the Court in Salerno, consists of the hypogeum - Chapel of St. Anne, the bell tower the courtroom and the upper hall of representation from the Church of St. Peter at the Court (Palatine Chapel), dedicated to Saints Peter and Paul. Duke-Prince Arechis II founded it during the Lombard age in the 8th century AD, during the time span between 758 and 774. It is a unique example in Europe of preservation of standing original walls of Lombard civil architecture.
The area where the Palatium was built had been occupied in the Roman period by a thermal bath of the Flavian-Trajan era (1st-2nd cent. AD). The groundwater of the historic centre is fed by two important streams: the Rafastia and the Fusandola. The Rafastia is the river that feeds the ancient frigidarium of S. Pietro a Corte. In late antiquity the structures, long abandoned due to flooding, were partly re-used as a place of Christian worship with an attached burial ground that returned inscriptions dating from the 5th to the 7th century AD. In the 8th century, in order to build the Palatium, the vaults of the thermal building were demolished, and inside the hall and its early Christian burial forepart were built powerful pillars and half-pillars designed to hold the overlying floor of the hall of representation of the Church (Palatine Chapel).
The monumental complex has five main layers:
• Roman baths (1st-2nd cent. AD);
• Building of early Christian worship, with an adjoining burial ground (5th-7th cent. AD);
• Throne hall and private chapel of the palace of the Lombard period (second half of the 8th century AD);
• The Church of St. Peter 'at the Court' with its phases and the Romanesque frescoes (from the 12th century).
• The medieval public palace: during the 13th century, the building was also the site of the meetings of Parliament and in it was held the ceremony of conferring the degrees of the Salerno Medical School.
In the alluvial layer were placed the burials of an ecclesia built in the thermal environments and frequented over the centuries 5th-7th from the various Socrates, Albulus, Teodenanda, Eutychia, Christians, therefore, of different ethnicity: Greek, Gothic, Roman.
The "Chronicon Salernitanum" bears witness to a bell tower erected by Prince Guaimar II around 922 AD. The present Romanesque bell tower that stands on the north side of the church belongs to a period later than the 10th century, as it was established based on stratigraphic relationships with the other surviving structures and quotas of the ancient roadways. Against the north wall of the complex, the small chapel dedicated to St. Anne, adjoining the Hypogeum has a 16th century painting representing the Virgin and Child with Saints as well as other frescoes on the north face and the vault devoted to the life of the Virgin attributed to Filippo Pennino, of the second half of the 18th century.
During the building of the chapel of the Lombard Duke’s palace, the vaults of the underlying space were eliminated and a loft was made, where colored marble “carpets” coming from buildings of the Imperial age were put. “Comacine” masters who worked at the Lombard court expertly assembled the pieces of red porphyry, green serpentine, bardiglio, cipollino and other types of polychrome marble and some of these are still today a unique exemplar of the early medieval decorative floor review.
Even the apse of the church was covered with a marble mosaic made up of several pieces of glass painted in gold, according to an old technique of the Roman tradition, also known by the glassmaker masters of the 8th century.
Written October 10, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Thomas Ozbun
Vicenza, Italy984 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2018 • Solo
A very prepared guide toured a family from Rome and I around the complex. The church used to be a Longobard Palace (the only remaining in the world) with still columns, arches and windows showing its precedent use. It was later transformed into a church in the Norman period and then again in the 16th century it was refurbished in the style of that period, when finally not long ago it was returned to its medieval state. Inside were some interesting pavements and mosaics dating to the Longobard period. Under the church is another religious complex which used to be roman baths first and then later an early christian cemetery and hypogeum with still some very nice longobard frescoes remaining
Written December 13, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

maratrasa
Napoli298 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2024 • Couples
In a lovely corner of Salerno is this ancient stratified building with free entry. Historic, interesting.
Google
Written February 6, 2024
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