Chiesa rupestre di San Pietro Barisano

Chiesa rupestre di San Pietro Barisano

Chiesa rupestre di San Pietro Barisano
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4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles368 reviews
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210
Very good
140
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12
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3
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3

KTGP
Adelaide, Australia5,873 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2016 • Couples
This is the largest of the Rupestrian Churches in Matera, dated 12th century. Sadly during the 60's and 70's numerous pieces of art were stolen and vandalised. The tufa stone image of Mary and Jesus being flanked by angels is exquisite. Walking through, you need to keep reminding yourself that it is excavated, not constructed, simply amazing. There is a putridarium, an area used for draining a corpse until only bones are left.

We spent over an hour here, as there is a fair amount to cover.

No photography allowed but there are postcards available.

The brochure has opening hours listed as -
1st April to 1st November 10am/7pm closed 2nd July
2nd November to 31st March 10am/2pm closed 25th December

Pay €3 for entry or buy a ticket for €6 and this gives entry to three of the following Rupestrian Churches -
Church of Santa Lucia alle Malve
Church of Santa Maria de Idris & San Giovanni in Monterrone
Church of San Pietro Barisano
Written June 24, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Brun066
Florence, Italy13,213 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2019 • Couples
This church contributes powerfully (not alone in Matera of course) to give awareness of the ways of life in the past, not only in Matera, but in all the settlements carved into the rock.
First of all, it should be noted that this is a former church. In fact, it has been deconsecrated, and therefore it no longer has any sacred character.
The church, like most of the buildings into the "Sassi", featurs only a small part in masonry. The facade (and the beautiful bell tower) are the only part that is not carved into the rock. The interior therefore - for those coming from "normal" cities or houses - has the appearance of a well organized cave.
Another salient feature is the lack of works of art inside, apart from those of contemporary art that have recently been added to it. This is because, after the Italian law of 1952 which sanctioned the uninhabitability of 80% of the buildings in the "Sassi", the almost deserted city favored the activity of looters.
It is commonly said that the rock habitats, due to poor ventilation, were even more unhealthy than those (already rather unhealthy for our standards) of any pre-industrial habitat (it would suffice in this regard to read "The foul and the fragrant", 1986, by the historian French Alain Corbin, original edition 1983). In fact, the presence of animals and manure inside cave dwellings had to determine an unbearable olfactory environment for us.
In the churches there were no animals or manure; but on the other hand, until the beginning of the nineteenth century, there were burials, moreover generally badly closed, which determined the same effect.
And in some churches, as in this one, there were also in the underground the macabre spaces in which the corpses of the ecclesiastics were settled, seated, until their complete putrefaction.
In short, the visit to this church made me appreciate even more the time in which we live, and in which we can visit in perfect hygienic conditions some evocative testimonies such as this church.
Written February 28, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Titus D
Sri Lanka6,908 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2017 • Friends
The brochure has opening hours listed as -1st April to 1st November 10am / 7pm closed 2nd July, 2nd November to 31st March 10am/2pm closed 25th December
Pay €3 for entry or buy a ticket for €6 and this gives entry to three of the following Rupestrian Churches. You can combine it with some other The brochure has opening hours listed as -1st April to 1st November 10am/7pm closed 2nd July
2nd November to 31st March 10am/2pm closed 25th December.
Buy a ticket for €6 and this gives entry to three of the following Rupestrian Churches.. A visit that i recommend. This is the largest of the Rupestrian Churches in Matera, dated 12th century. Sadly during the 60's and 70's numerous pieces of art were stolen and vandalized.
There is an area used for draining a corpse until only bones are left. There are opportunities to go downstairs but be aware that several of the steps are very worn and slippery.
There is a film which is very useful in respect of the history of the Sassi, but very little about the church and the frescoes. The Church is carved into the rock and is monumental sporting an eighteenth-century facade and a rose window and the bell tower.
This church has an extensive underground section; monks' corpses were "drained" in one area, wow. This Church is an example of fusion between excavation and construction and dates back from the year one thousand.
This is one place where the hideous tower crane that shares the skyline with the Duomo can be blocked in your photo, by the campanile of S Pietro Barisano. Go and visit this church a little further away on the stairs, get ready for a fairly big walk if you are touring in one day, but it is really worth the trip. No photography allowed but there are postcards available.
One of the famous Restrain churches of Matera. Built - or rather hewn in the rock - around year 1000. It is typical of the Sassi constructions with facade of tufa (but not original - the present one dates back to 18th century) . It contains some old frescoes, altars and some tunnels. Information leaflet is available in English.
It is little out of the way, but worth seeking out.
However the best part is that in the stairs/landings above the church, approached from Via S Cesarea, there's a great viewpoint that gives you the classic Matera view, with the campanile of S Pietro Barisano in the foreground, and the Sassi scaling the hill behind, with the Duomo on the top of the hill. Interesting place, the pictures from the XVII century not so well preserved.
Underneath the church there is a labirinth of tunnels, we entered through a tunnel somewhere on the left and got out behind the altar.
We picked this church for its size, and to contrast with S.Lucia. We hadn't realized it had an interesting network of tunnels underneath that could be explored - our son loved it!
The walls weren't nearly as interesting, but the volume and effort to create the space was quite incredible.
The church was also a lot less busy, with no big groups through during our visit (though it was around lunchtime). There was also a weird art show on display, which there didn't seem to be any information.
This cave church is more modern in structure, but it's unique in that you can go underground through a maze like area. It is less visited, so you may get it all to yourself too.
The tufa stone image of Mary and Jesus being flanked by angels is exquisite. Walking through, you need to keep reminding yourself that it is excavated, not constructed, simply amazing.
The brochure has opening hours listed as -1st April to 1st November 10am/7pm closed 2nd July
2nd November to 31st March 10am/2pm closed 25th December
Pay €3 for entry or buy a ticket for €6 and this gives entry to three of the following Rupestrian Churches. A1Entry is 3 euros but you can combine it with some other restrain churches for some discounts. A visit that i recommend. This is the largest of the Rupestrian Churches in Matera, dated 12th century. Sadly during the 60's and 70's numerous pieces of art were stolen and vandalized.
There is an area used for draining a corpse until only bones are left. There are opportunities to go downstairs but be aware that several of the steps are very worn and slippery.
There is a film which is very useful in respect of the history of the sassi, but very little about the church and the frescos. The Church is carved into the rock and is monumental sporting an eighteenth-century facade and a rose window and the bell tower.
This church has an extensive underground section; monks' corpses were "drained" in one area, wow. This Church is an example of fusion between excavation and construction and dates back from the year one thousand.
This is one place where the hideous tower crane that shares the skyline with the Duomo can be blocked in your photo, by the campanile of S Pietro Barisano. Go and visit this church a little further away on the stairs, get ready for a fairly big walk if you are touring in one day, but it is really worth the trip. No photography allowed but there are postcards available.
One of the famous Restrain churches of Matera. Built - or rather hewn in the rock - around year 1000. It is typical of the Sassi constructions with facade of tufa (but not original - the present one dates back to 18th century) . It contains some old frescoes, altars and some tunnels. Information leaflet is available in English.
It is little out of the way, but worth seeking out.
However the best part is that in the stairs/landings above the church, approached from Via S Cesarea, there's a great viewpoint that gives you the classic Matera view, with the campanile of S Pietro Barisano in the foreground, and the Sassi scaling the hill behind, with the Duomo on the top of the hill. Interesting place, the pictures from the XVII century not so well preserved.
Underneath the church there is a labirinth of tunnels, we entered through a tunnel somewhere on the left and got out behind the altar.
We picked this church for its size, and to contrast with S.Lucia. We hadn't realized it had an interesting network of tunnels underneath that could be explored - our son loved it!
The walls weren't nearly as interesting, but the volume and effort to create the space was quite incredible.
The church was also a lot less busy, with no big groups through during our visit (though it was around lunchtime). There was also a weird art show on display, which there didn't seem to be any information.
This cave church is more modern in structure, but it's unique in that you can go underground through a maze like area. It is less visited, so you may get it all to yourself too.
The tufa stone image of Mary and Jesus being flanked by angels is exquisite. Walking through, you need to keep reminding yourself that it is excavated, not constructed, simply amazing.
The brochure has opening hours listed as -1st April to 1st November 10am/7pm closed 2nd July
2nd November to 31st March 10am/2pm closed 25th December
Pay €3 for entry or buy a ticket for €6 and this gives entry to three of the following Rupestrian Churches. A1Entry is 3 euros but you can combine it with some other restrain churches for some discounts. A visit that i recommend. This is the largest of the Rupestrian Churches in Matera, dated 12th century. Sadly during the 60's and 70's numerous pieces of art were stolen and vandalized.
There is an area used for draining a corpse until only bones are left. There are opportunities to go downstairs but be aware that several of the steps are very worn and slippery.
There is a film which is very useful in respect of the history of the sassi, but very little about the church and the frescos. The Church is carved into the rock and is monumental sporting an eighteenth-century facade and a rose window and the bell tower.
This church has an extensive underground section; monks' corpses were "drained" in one area, wow. This Church is an example of fusion between excavation and construction and dates back from the year one thousand.
This is one place where the hideous tower crane that shares the skyline with the Duomo can be blocked in your photo, by the campanile of S Pietro Barisano. Go and visit this church a little further away on the stairs, get ready for a fairly big walk if you are touring in one day, but it is really worth the trip. No photography allowed but there are postcards available.
One of the famous Restrain churches of Matera. Built - or rather hewn in the rock - around year 1000. It is typical of the Sassi constructions with facade of tufa (but not original - the present one dates back to 18th century) . It contains some old frescoes, altars and some tunnels. Information leaflet is available in English.
It is little out of the way, but worth seeking out.
However the best part is that in the stairs/landings above the church, approached from Via S Cesarea, there's a great viewpoint that gives you the classic Matera view, with the campanile of S Pietro Barisano in the foreground, and the Sassi scaling the hill behind, with the Duomo on the top of the hill. Interesting place, the pictures from the XVII century not so well preserved.
Underneath the church there is a labirinth of tunnels, we entered through a tunnel somewhere on the left and got out behind the altar.
We picked this church for its size, and to contrast with S.Lucia. We hadn't realized it had an interesting network of tunnels underneath that could be explored - our son loved it!
The walls weren't nearly as interesting, but the volume and effort to create the space was quite incredible.
The church was also a lot less busy, with no big groups through during our visit (though it was around lunchtime). There was also a weird art show on display, which there didn't seem to be any information.
This cave church is more modern in structure, but it's unique in that you can go underground through a maze like area. It is less visited, so you may get it all to yourself too.
The tufa stone image of Mary and Jesus being flanked by angels is exquisite. Walking through, you need to keep reminding yourself that it is excavated, not constructed, simply amazing.
This is the largest of the Rupestrian Churches in Matera, dated 12th century. Sadly during the 60's and 70's numerous pieces of art were stolen and vandalized.
There is an area used for draining a corpse until only bones are left. There are opportunities to go downstairs but be aware that several of the steps are very worn and slippery.
There is a film which is very useful in respect of the history of the Sassi, but very little about the church and the frescoes. The Church is carved into the rock and is monumental sporting an eighteenth-century facade and a rose window and the bell tower.
This church has an extensive underground section; monks' corpses were "drained" in one area, wow. This Church is an example of fusion between excavation and construction and dates back from the year one thousand.
This is one place where the hideous tower crane that shares the skyline with the Duomo can be blocked in your photo, by the campanile of S Pietro Barisano. Go and visit this church a little further away on the stairs, get ready for a fairly big walk if you are touring in one day, but it is really worth the trip. No photography allowed but there are postcards available.
One of the famous Restrain churches of Matera. Built - or rather hewn in the rock - around year 1000. It is typical of the Sassi constructions with facade of tufa (but not original - the present one dates back to 18th century) . It contains some old frescoes, altars and some tunnels. Information leaflet is available in English.
It is little out of the way, but worth seeking out.
However the best part is that in the stairs/landings above the church, approached from Via S Cesarea, there's a great viewpoint that gives you the classic Matera view, with the campanile of S Pietro Barisano in the foreground, and the Sassi scaling the hill behind, with the Duomo on the top of the hill. Interesting place, the pictures from the XVII century not so well preserved.
Underneath the church there is a labirinth of tunnels, we entered through a tunnel somewhere on the left and got out behind the altar.
We picked this church for its size, and to contrast with S.Lucia. We hadn't realized it had an interesting network of tunnels underneath that could be explored - our son loved it!
The walls weren't nearly as interesting, but the volume and effort to create the space was quite incredible.
The church was also a lot less busy, with no big groups through during our visit (though it was around lunchtime). There was also a weird art show on display, which there didn't seem to be any information.
This cave church is more modern in structure, but it's unique in that you can go underground through a maze like area. It is less visited, so you may get it all to yourself too. The tufa stone image of Mary and Jesus being flanked by angels is exquisite. Walking through, you need to keep reminding yourself that it is excavated, not constructed, simply amazing.
Written February 6, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Dierregi
Varese, Italy2,330 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2021
Our hotel was located just next to this church and the staff recommended it as a must-see, being the only church in Matera almost completely excavated in the rocks.

You enter for a fee of 3 Euro and you can also get a cheaper ticket to visit other historic buildings. The church itself it’s as labyrinthine as the city, with plenty of small rooms and niches.

The creepiest part was the cellar, narrow, humid and a bit smelly, which in the past was used as a drying place for the bodies of dead clergy, that were left seated in niches in the wall, until the flesh was gone. The bones were then collect, as solid remains and proof of immortality.

Weir experience and cellar to be avoided if you are claustrophobic.
Written September 25, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

redrum777
Bracknell, UK145 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2015 • Couples
The church was small and did not take long to look around like some of the other churches we visited but it did have an eery feel about it especially where the seats carved from stone where made for the dead people who were seated here.There are steps that lead down to the cave where the bodes were taken.Great parts to the church also.
Written March 2, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

NWtraveler969
Seattle, WA349 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2017 • Family
This church has an extensive underground section; monks' corpses were "drained" in one area, wow. However the best part is that in the stairs/landings above the church, approached from Via S Cesarea, there's a great viewpoint that gives you the classic Matera view, with the campanile of S Pietro Barisano in the foreground, and the Sassi scaling the hill behind, with the Duomo on the top of the hill. This is one place where the hideous tower crane that shares the skyline with the Duomo can be blocked in your photo, by the campanile of S Pietro Barisano.
Written July 10, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

KrisD_pl
Warsaw, Poland7,710 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2016 • Couples
One of the famous rupestrian churches of Matera. Built - or rather hewn in the rock - around year 1000. Typical of the sassi constructions with facade of tufa (but not original - the present one dates back to 18th century) . It contains some old frescoes, altars and some tunnels. Information leaflet is available in English. Entry is 3 euros but you can combine it with some other rupestrian churches for some discounts. A visit that i recommend.
Written December 18, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Rose N
Montana Rose1,005 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2016 • Friends
A little out of the way, but worth seeking out. This cave church is more modern in structure, but it's unique in that you can go underground through a maze like area. Less visited, so you may get it all to yourself too.
Written July 11, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

vidhusagar
chennI1,183 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2015 • Couples
The Church is carved into the rock and is monumental sporting an eighteenth-century facade and a rose window and the bell tower.
This Church is and example of fusion between excavation and construction and dates back from the year one thousand.
Written October 26, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

rob m
London25 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2015 • Couples
A very special place - for thought and contemplation on the lives spent inhabiting this Church. To sit amongst the seats of the putridarium is an experience, especially when considering the lives of the folk who once lived in the Sassi //
Written August 4, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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