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Museu Maritim de Barcelona

894 Reviews

Museu Maritim de Barcelona

894 Reviews
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Av. de les Drassanes S/N, 08001 Barcelona Spain
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DrassanesBarcelona Metro2 min
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Skip the Line: Park Guell Admission Ticket
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Skip the Line: Park Guell Admission Ticket

245 reviews
Admission tickets for Park Güell, one of Barcelona’s most popular attractions, typically sell out quickly; however, by buying tickets online in advance, you can guarantee entry, avoid the long lines, and save time on the day. Instead of queueing in the heat, explore Park Güell—including the Dragon Staircase, Hypostyle Room, and more—at your own pace.
$19.25 per adult
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Kelleygirl2 wrote a review Oct 18
Sarasota, Florida6,460 contributions500 helpful votes
+1
The Maritime Museum of Barcelona faced Port Vell and the statue of Columbus and we were eager to explore the exhibits. The museum is dedicated to providing information about shipbuilding between the 13th and 18th centuries and is located inside the Barcelona Royal Shipyard, the Drassanes Redials de Barcelona, or royal arsenal of Barcelona which is over 700 years old. Constructed in the 13th century it was a place to build and maintain the galleys and vessels of war for King of Aragon Pere “the Great”. This also served to encourage the important expansion of the Catalan shipping industry. The construction of the royal shipyard started between 1280 and 1300. Originally, the shipyards consisted of a walled area without a roof. The complex resembled a fortress, there was a watchtower on each corner, two of which are still preserved today. The shipyard halls with roof were completed in 1381. After the first completion the Gothic shipyard consisted of a total of eight halls, in each of which a ship could be built. In 1571, the La Real was built in the Drassanes. The shipyard halls were gradually expanded and at the end of the 16th century, the Drassanes already consisted of 16 halls, which then were expanded in 1618 by three halls. Interestingly sections of the exterior of this building are part of the city’s old medieval wall and surviving tower, including the gate known as the Portal de Santa Madrona, a gate used to enter Barcelona during the Middle Ages. The exhibitions inside this building show examples of traditional maritime professions, construction techniques and the life of a sailor aboard ship. Audio narrators told seven stories from seven people of their lives aboard ships, from experiences of discovering new lands, piracy and buccaneers, to life on board a luxury transatlantic liner, it presented a “voyage through history of modern and contemporary sailing”. The figureheads were always supposed to make sure that the sailing ships sail safely through the sea. The main part of this collection comes from Catalan sailing ships of the 19th Century. Dave was fascinated by the replica of the medieval Rowing Galley, the faithful reproduction of a galley from the 16th Century. The 60-metres-long royal galley Admirals of Juan de Austria was involved in the Battle of Lepanto on 7 October 1571, in which the Turkish Armada was defeated. Two hundred thirty six people at fifty nine oars used to row on this galley. What really made me horrified was the depiction of the life of the rowing slaves that was vividly presented through ghost like apparitions describing their experiences on these ships. There was so much more to see: a Roman graveyard discovered in 2012 during excavations for the museum, gardens to see, and across in the harbor, not far from the museum buildings, the three-mast schooner Santa Eulàlia, a typical merchant ship of that time. It would have been fun to see all of this as well as still other exhibits inside (real enthusiasts could easily spend a day here) but Dave was getting hungry.
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Date of experience: November 2019
2 Helpful votes
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Mairwen1 wrote a review Aug 2020
Sydney, Australia2,629 contributions512 helpful votes
+1
If you are on a tight itinerary, then this isn’t a must-see but if you have some extra days to explore, then it’s an interesting diversion. It’s a little pricey for a small museum (€10) but they have free entry on Sundays after 3pm. The star attraction here is a full size replica of the Royal Galley, built 1568. The best bit without a doubt, is that you can actually walk onto it. It’s pretty impressive – 60m long with 2 masts and 50+ oars, 3 golden lanterns at the back and a golden figurehead of Neptune riding a dolphin at the front. Neptune holds a trident above his head and his arm is poised, ready to strike. The flagship galley was part of the Fleet of the Holy League and fought in the Battle of Lepanto, defeating the Ottoman Empire in 1571. The battle was a huge turning point in history and effectively saved Europe from Turkish expansion. Although I don’t have any special interest in maritime history or boats, we easily spent about 2 hours here. I thought they did several things very, very well. Firstly, they did a really excellent job of providing information that was presented in an informative and appealing way. Large panels with diagrams and pictures made the information accessible to both children and adults. I was fascinated/horrified by the panels that described the life of a galley slave. Rowers only survived for about 2 years. They spent this miserably short time chained to their bench, where they were exposed to the burning sun and elements and rowed, ate and slept, covered in their own faeces and urine. Two years would have been two years too long. The other thing they have done incredibly well is designing the museum space within the original 13th century Royal Shipyards. Inside, they have created an open, modern space for the exhibitions but have retained the high ceilings and rounded arches of the original structure. The building is like an exhibit itself. As you walk around you are reminded that this was a working building for over 700 years. This was where the Spanish ships were built, maintained and repaired in the days of galley warfare, when the Spanish fleet was the best in the world. Apart from the galley, the other displays range in level of general interest. There are small collections of maps, navigational instruments, figureheads and ship standards which I found interesting and again, the displays were well-supported by signs and information. Some displays were less interesting such as the history of luggage. The museum is only a minute or two away from the Port Vell waterfront. It's a great location to go and get something to eat or drink. We headed over to Maremagnum and had lunch at Tapa Tapa, where we could sit, looking out over the harbour. Later we went for a long, leisurely walk around the waterfront promenade and checked out the modern boats and luxury yachts. FREE ENTRY: On Sunday, between 3 – 7pm, there is no entry fee. You still need to get a ticket to go through the turnstile so you might have to line up at the counter where they will give you a free ticket. We arrived some time just after 3pm and there was no queue at all. However, when we left around 5pm-ish, the queue stretched outside the door. HOURS: Open 10 – 8pm every day (although I believe that they are now closing on Mondays) FACILITIES: There is a large café, a gift shop and bathrooms which can all be accessed without having to pay and enter the museum.
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Date of experience: January 2020
3 Helpful votes
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Mikko V wrote a review Feb 2020
Bergen, Norway7 contributions
Really interesting museum with video shows and english audio guidance. One can spend easily several hours exploring maritime history.
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Date of experience: February 2020
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Max B wrote a review Feb 2020
Toronto, Canada67 contributions26 helpful votes
If you love the ocean and boats the Maritime Museum is a must see in Barcelona. The building itself is quite incredible, being a naval and shipbuilding facility for several hundred years. But even more spectacular is the huge sailing and rowing galleon that plied the Mediterranean. It is amazing and is surrounded by great interpretive displays. There are several large galleries depicting other aspects of the maritime history of Barcelona. All a great experience and very well presented. Comes right up to emigrant voyages to the New World and present day cruise lines.
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Date of experience: November 2019
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Rachel C wrote a review Feb 2020
Barcelona, Spain20 contributions1 helpful vote
+1
Wow! I spent 4 hours in this museum marveling over the amazing interactive displays. Historical pieces. The reconstituted boat from the 16th century and the building itself ! Worth a trip for anyone interested in boats trade and how a port cities functions! Amazing transition from old times to now and you feel like you’re transported back through time just by being in the building itself.
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Date of experience: February 2020
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