Musée d’Archéologie Méditerranéenne

Musée d’Archéologie Méditerranéenne

Musée d’Archéologie Méditerranéenne
4.5
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Tuesday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Wednesday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Thursday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Friday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Saturday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Sunday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
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4.5
290 reviews
Excellent
138
Very good
114
Average
27
Poor
11
Terrible
0

Dimitris L
Sydney, Australia45,371 contributions
Aug 2019
Musee d'Archeologie Mediterraneenne is located in the Centre de la Vieille Charité, which is a nice looking building. It has quite a bit of history too. The building itself was set up originally to care for the underprivileged. In the 19th century the Museum was also set up with many fantastic treasures being put on display. There are several collections, particularly Greek, Roman as well as Egyptian. Worth a visit.
Written July 3, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

memberHolland
Holland625 contributions
May 2011
This museum is situated in "Centre de la Vieille Charité", a beautiful building that was a home for beggars in the 17th century. There are several museums in the building, we only visited the museum of Mediterranean Archeology. There are archeological discoveries from the Greeks and the Romans and Egyptian sarcophagi and mummies that were discovered by a doctor from Marseille when he was in Egypt. The entrance fee was 3 euro per person. All displays are in French only.
Written May 14, 2011
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

AlexandraCCL
Belgium124 contributions
Nov 2011
The museum is one of the oldest in Marseille and has three collections: Egyptian antiquities, Classical antiquities and Regional antiquities. All collections are very attractively displayed, but we thought the rooms with the Egyption collection the most interesting. Do'nt miss it with children.
The museum is housed in a 17th C building called "Centre de la Vieille Charité", which has a chapel with a beautiful cupola. You can make some very nice photos here!
Peaceful and not crowded. A very good idea for a rainy day!
Written November 29, 2011
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Rita D
London26 contributions
Jan 2013 • Couples
Go here soon if you can to catch an excellent exhibition!

There are a number of reasons to visit La Vieille Charité (as this is often called). It is a tremendous building, built in pinkish-creamy stone during the late17th and early 18th centuries by the multi-talented Pierre Paul Puget — a French painter, sculptor, architect and engineer who was born in Marseille. The building looks immense as you approach it through narrow streets — there are no windows facing the exterior. Inside you see that it is rectangular, and made up of four sides of arcaded galleries, three storeys high, and looking onto a lovely Baroque central chapel in the centre of its courtyard. Originally it was designed as an almshouse for the poor; in fact it quickly became housing for the thousands of beggars filling Marseille from the 17th century onwards.

In the 1970s the building was painstakingly and beautifully restored, and now houses a number of museum spaces and academic institutions, a cafe and an excellent shop.

The splendid chapel is set aside for temporary exhibitions; and during this, Marseille’s year of being European Cultural Capital, it houses a wonderful small exhibition reflecting the beginnings of Marseille — its settlement by Greeks from Phocea in 600 BC. The Greeks brought many skills with them — they were experienced traders with wide Mediterranean contacts; had great skills in metallurgy, pottery and building in stone; they brought olives and vines to Provence; and they could write! — they had developed their own alphabet from the vowel-less one they had acquired from the Phoenecians. Most importantly, apparently they were able to live peacefully alongside their Celtic-Ligurian Provencal neighbours over many centuries.

The curating of this exhibition takes enormous care to communicate what the Greeks achieved in Marseille. Its excellent explanatory boards — in French, Greek and English (which should allow most visitors to be able to follow at least one of them) — pick up a variety of significant threads of their occupation in the area. The display uses the rather limited physical remains (mostly ceramic fragments) of their settlement to great effect. And then — an extraordinary achievement for the museum team — Delphi has lent the exhibition some very precious stone fragments from the ‘Treasury’ that Marseille erected in Delphi during the century after it was founded. Quite splendid 3D video graphics are used vividly alongside these stones to show what this Treasury probably looked like, how it would have been built, and what it probably contained. In building this Treasury in Delphi, and stocking it with their most prized artefacts in metal and stone, the Greek settlers in Marseille were doing what all other major Greek cities did in ancient times — displaying their success and wealth to their peers while creating a magnificent donation in the most important religious place in the Greek world.

The staff at this exhibition were immensely helpful to us, in using English where we could not follow the French, and in helping my partner, who uses a mobility scooter, to get around safely and comfortably. All parts of the exhibition were accessible to her.

Do pay a visit if you can.
Written January 27, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Ree21
Melbourne67 contributions
Sep 2011 • Couples
The museum is an old poor house which has been restored and is truly worth visiting just on its own. The various collections housed within it's walls whilst small are definitely worth the visit. There are items we haven't seen in other Greek, Egyptian etc collections and each piece is carefully displayed. The benefit of this museum is you can take your time and really appreciate the items. Other museums are inundated with oher tourists and you have to fight your way through and hope to get a glimpse. Here you can spend as long as you like and almost have the place to yourself. We went on a Sunday and it was free entry. Don't know if that is every Sunday.
Written October 12, 2011
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

MILOUW
New York City, NY1,334 contributions
Mar 2013 • Couples
This is an old hospice transformed into a museum
In the center of the courtyard is the Old Chapel also part of the museum
Currently there is an exhhibit showing some artifacts recently discovered while renovating the town.
Unfortunately they are only very small fragments and not all that intresting
The other collections are scattered in thebsurrounding building and include African,Oceanian and Mexican exhibits.
There is also a more traditional egyptian antique section.
While not extensive in range ,the collections are well displayed
Written March 16, 2013
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YGraig
Caerdydd19 contributions
Sep 2011 • Couples
Absolutely stunning old building complex (la Vielle Charite), housing a collection of Mediterranean archaeology on the first floor and art from Africa, Oceania and South America on the second floor. Labels and displays in French only.

Cafe on ground floor with nice salads - you can sit out on the gravel courtyard.
Written October 10, 2011
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

reposriberac
Thiviers, France513 contributions
Apr 2014 • Couples
At the top of the hill of the Panier district can be found La Vieille Charite aka Museum of Mediterranean Archaeology. Various exhibitions are held in this former home for the poor which was started by Marseille architect Puget in 1670 and completed in 1749. There is a central chapel with an ovoid cupola in Roman Baroque style (here you can leave your bags and parcels safely). The Vieille Charite fell into ruins and was rescued by Le Corbusier in the 1950s. When we visited it was not the high season and we were able to view the 'Visages' exhibition (Matisse, Picasso, Warhol et al) which was cleverly arranged in a series of consecutive rooms without huge crowds. As well as having a large open space to sit and contemplate there is also a small cafe and very good book and gift shop.
Written April 24, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

pooyousir
london90 contributions
Feb 2013 • Couples
Entry is about €5 which gives you access to the 1st and 2nd floors, which is where all the (what I assume is) permanent exhibitions are displayed. Students under 27 get in for free. I don't think they have any displays in the ground floor (if they do, then I missed them). The 1st floor is just general uninspiring Roman stuff (probably inspiring if you like general Roman stuff), but the 2nd floor is filled with amazing pieces from the likes of Mexico, Vanuatu, Micronesia, Polynesia and Africa - more of anthropological than archaeological interest. It seemed to not be a problem taking any photos.
The building itself is beautiful - so peaceful and 'zen' compared to the relative architectural chaos that surrounds it (in Le Panier area of Marseille).
Also, there's a really good and reasonably cheap restaurant nearby. Turn left out the gate, cross over the square, and walk up the hill for 20 metres: Clan des Cigales (on the left). You have to walk through the shop of the same name to get to the restaurant bit.
Written February 10, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Jannerbloke
Plymouth, UK12,603 contributions
Oct 2012 • Couples
Like so much of Marseille it is undersold and poorly advertised. We failed to give this evidently excellent museum enough time on our short four night stay in the city. We came by on the red tourist map walk. Otherwise we would not have known about it at all. Apparently formerly a poor house but very sensitively restored. Stylish and attractive classical building around a neat central building with portico. On our day we were further deflected by smart long tents occupying three sides of the centre containing bustling crowds taking a surprisingly enthusiastic interest in hand made paper books with manuscript or hand printed texts and drawings. Fascinating but it meant that we didn't realise how much and how impressive collection it Egyptian and maritime historical artefacts were so close. We enjoyed Marseille and intend to return. This will be one of the attractions we do not miss next time..
Written October 20, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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