Rue Norvins
Points of Interest & LandmarksHistoric Walking Areas
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Brian T
By Brian T
Look beyond the tourist crowds to really appreciate this historic street!
Nov 2021
Most visitors to Paris will find their way to Montmartre, and most will walk this neighbourhood’s busiest street, the lively cobbled stretch that is Rue Norvins. It dates back to 1672, though the original street had two names: Rue Traînée, between Rue du Mont-Cenis and Rue des Saules, and Rue des Moulins between Rue des Saules and Rue Girardon. It assumed the name of Rue Norvins in 1868. Montmartre has a myriad of historic pathways and streets; Rue Norvins is one of the best preserved streets from the neighbourhood’s village past. And no doubt it was frequently trodden by the many famous artists of the past who called Montmartre their home. Today it is Montmartre’s most-visited street, running from the exclusive Avenue Junot to the bustling Place du Tertre. To really appreciate it, you need to look beyond the crowds and the tat which envelop the street and blur its historic beauty. The street is home to a myriad of restaurants, and dozens of souvenir stores selling all manner of rubbish from Eiffel Tower key rings, cheap ‘I love Paris’ T-shirts, and poor quality prints of everything to do with Paris. It can be a bit overwhelming, especially with the crowds which inevitably descent here, but look past them towards the historic architecture, the views, and the domes of the basilica rising above it all. It’s these thing which, to me, make Rue Norvins special. Place du Tertre at its eastern end is best appreciated on a fine day, when it bustles with artists at work, paining or drawing and selling their wares. Enjoy it with a coffee or drink at one of the numerous restaurants which face the little square, though expect to pay a premium for the privilege and don’t expect Paris’s finest offerings. I’ve eaten at a few restaurants around the square; choose wisely! Interestingly enough, dating to 1133, the Benedictines of Montmartre administered justice in the gallows at Place du Tertre. But fear not. The last public hanging took place in 1775. At the western end, most visitors leave the street at the landmark restaurant Le Consulat. But do continue on as you’ll spot the site of Montmartre’s first water supply, the Fontaine du Château d’eau de Montmartre. It was established in 1835, though the Neo-renassiance reservoir fountain has been out of service since 1927. A little further down and just off Rue Norvins you will come across Place Marcel Aymé. Here you will find the curious statue of Dutilleul, the man who possessed super powers in Marcel Aymé's book ‘Le Passe-Muraille’ - the ‘Passer Through Walls’. By all means visit this historic street, but look beyond the tourist crows and paraphernalia and you will be rewarded.

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Brian T
London, UK6,782 contributions
Nov 2021
Most visitors to Paris will find their way to Montmartre, and most will walk this neighbourhood’s busiest street, the lively cobbled stretch that is Rue Norvins. It dates back to 1672, though the original street had two names: Rue Traînée, between Rue du Mont-Cenis and Rue des Saules, and Rue des Moulins between Rue des Saules and Rue Girardon. It assumed the name of Rue Norvins in 1868.

Montmartre has a myriad of historic pathways and streets; Rue Norvins is one of the best preserved streets from the neighbourhood’s village past. And no doubt it was frequently trodden by the many famous artists of the past who called Montmartre their home. Today it is Montmartre’s most-visited street, running from the exclusive Avenue Junot to the bustling Place du Tertre.

To really appreciate it, you need to look beyond the crowds and the tat which envelop the street and blur its historic beauty. The street is home to a myriad of restaurants, and dozens of souvenir stores selling all manner of rubbish from Eiffel Tower key rings, cheap ‘I love Paris’ T-shirts, and poor quality prints of everything to do with Paris. It can be a bit overwhelming, especially with the crowds which inevitably descent here, but look past them towards the historic architecture, the views, and the domes of the basilica rising above it all. It’s these thing which, to me, make Rue Norvins special.

Place du Tertre at its eastern end is best appreciated on a fine day, when it bustles with artists at work, paining or drawing and selling their wares. Enjoy it with a coffee or drink at one of the numerous restaurants which face the little square, though expect to pay a premium for the privilege and don’t expect Paris’s finest offerings. I’ve eaten at a few restaurants around the square; choose wisely! Interestingly enough, dating to 1133, the Benedictines of Montmartre administered justice in the gallows at Place du Tertre. But fear not. The last public hanging took place in 1775.

At the western end, most visitors leave the street at the landmark restaurant Le Consulat. But do continue on as you’ll spot the site of Montmartre’s first water supply, the Fontaine du Château d’eau de Montmartre. It was established in 1835, though the Neo-renassiance reservoir fountain has been out of service since 1927. A little further down and just off Rue Norvins you will come across Place Marcel Aymé. Here you will find the curious statue of Dutilleul, the man who possessed super powers in Marcel Aymé's book ‘Le Passe-Muraille’ - the ‘Passer Through Walls’.

By all means visit this historic street, but look beyond the tourist crows and paraphernalia and you will be rewarded.
Written January 25, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

picasso812
Carpinteria, CA78 contributions
Apr 2018 • Solo
Entering the Rue Norvins where the cafes, shops and restaurants are located you’ll see Le Consulat Restaurant which I’ve seen in a few movies. At the end of the Rue Norvins you’ll come across the Place du Tertre. A square lined with cafes and restaurants. The square use to be filled with hundreds of artists. Now the restaurants have all taken a piece of the square and filled it with tables to increase their seating. The artists now are reduced to the fringes of the square. But if you sit outside of the cafe or restaurants facing the square you can watch the artists paint. Its not a very long stretch to explore but it’s worth a visit. It’s touristy for sure, but you’re a tourist so check it out. Grab a coffee and pan au chocolat early in the morning, walk through the Rue Norvins and to the steps of the Sacre Couer and watch the sunrise or sunset on the only hill in Paris and take in the whole city.
Written September 4, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Thomas V
Oakland, CA16,727 contributions
May 2022
This street was jammed with people, much more than ever before, and I have been here many times. So crowded that it was hard to walk down. It is pretty, but now way too crowded.
Written August 28, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Dr Tony M
London, UK878 contributions
Jan 2020
On a cold rainy day this restaurant / bar was a God send. Good food and a great atmosphere, we lingered longer.
Written January 14, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Taxidevil
Glasgow, UK3,001 contributions
Oct 2017 • Couples
Rue Novins is an old cobbled street leading up to the popular tourist destination of Place du Tertre and so it can get very busy. It is not very long but full of souvenir shops.
Written October 12, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
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