Sambo's Grave

Sambo's Grave, Lancaster

Sambo's Grave
4.5
Points of Interest & Landmarks
Read more
Detailed Reviews: Reviews order informed by descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as cleanliness, atmosphere, general tips and location information.
Popular mentions

4.5
97 reviews
Excellent
53
Very good
30
Average
10
Poor
2
Terrible
2

shauna_of_the_dead
Manchester, UK126 contributions
Couples
Was very humbling to see the grave of the poor boy taken as a slave and who died, RIP sambo. There was lots of painted stones there and I wish I’d taken one to leave there, it was a bit of a rush as we thought the tide would come in. 😩 Be aware you can’t drive up to the grave, you have to park at the bottom where the toilets are and walk, very muddy when we went down a dirt track.
Written January 3, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Gaz-Ewart
Stoke-on-Trent, UK28 contributions
Family
First and foremost, it would be wrong for me to really rate this as an attraction. Unfortunately it is the only way that I can write about this for TripAdvisor.

The nearly 300 year old burial site of a young black boy is remarkable in its rarity.

First time visitors I recommend reading up on the history of this place, of the story of Sambo himself.

The long and short of it is, in the early 1700's Sambo was on a ship bound to England from the West Indies. It is unknown if he was a slave or a cabin boy. Upon reaching the beautiful hamlet of Sunderland Point, Sambo was put up in an inn whilst his master went further inshore to conduct business.
Sambo with his poor command of English thought his master abandoned him, became ill and died. It may be that he contracted a European disease and died.
However he was then buried where he lies, outside of consecrated ground, in just the clothes he wore.

One may think that this is a sad story, and yes it maybe. But we have to look at it with the benefit of hindsight, given that the persons around Sambo at the time of his death saw fit to bury him and that his story still lives on shows that compassion can be found in all walks of life.

So take twenty minutes out of your day, watch for the high tides and visit the lovely hamlet of Sunderland Point. Take a short stroll to this most peaceful of burial sites, take a bunch of flowers or even a small painted rock. Place it upon Sambo's grave, remind him that even three hundred years later he is not forgotten. And in doing so have a moments peace to yourself, breathe in the fresh sea air and enjoy the peace not often found these days.
Written September 2, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

GlitterMonkey
Manchester, UK98 contributions
Couples
We went on Saturday to visit Sambo's grave at Sunderland Point and fell in love with the small hamlet. The sky was blue and it was so peaceful. We had to wait for the tide to go out as it covers the road so check the tides before going. Or call at The Globe Public House before you cross and they'll tell you when it safe. We found parking easy and free (can't miss it really) and also there's free public toilets which are very clean. We set off and asked one of the locals where the grave was, good directions, to be honest we would have found it as it's sign posted but we just made sure. Such a sad story about the little guy, but at least he's cared for now. We stayed there for about 30 minutes and then carried on walking around the headland which brings you out at the Old Sunderland Hall. What a place if I won the lottery tomorrow I would buy this straight away. From there it's back to the car park and over the road again. A lovely afternoon out, there's no cafes or pubs at Sunderland Point just fields and houses and a perfect beach with peace and quiet. You can't help but fall in love with the this little charming hamlet, needless to say will be going back very soon....
Written June 17, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

RedJezandLyn
Stockport, UK303 contributions
Couples
Although some say that Sambo was a slave, it's more likely that he was a servant boy to the captain of a ship that arrived from the West Indies in 1787 when Sunderland Point was a thriving port for ships of various cargos such as cotton, sugar and sadly slaves. Whilst the ships captain was away in Lancaster on business the boy was put up in local lodgings, but unable to understand English he fell ill, fretting over where his master was and refusing all food and drink so that after a few days he died. Sailors buried him near the shoreline. Sunderland Point declined as a port so that it became an isolated hamlet reached by a small lane that gets covered by the tide twice a day. Sixty years after Sambo's burial the retired headmaster (ironically the brother of a well known slave trader) of the local grammar school raised funds for a marked grave and memorial plaque. Now it's visited by many people with children in particular leaving little mementos and painted stones, so that poor Sambo is not forgotten.
Written March 10, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

keljay68
Cleveland, OH54 contributions
Couples
My husband and I make the trek to the grave from our hotel in Lancaster. We had to walk over the part where the tide comes in. Make sure you plan ahead as the road will be submerged if you come at the wrong time. It’s a beautiful little walk to to the town. Once you get to the town, it’s a short walk to the grave. Nice to pay your respects to someone who was ripped from their homelands and experienced a lot in their short life.
Written February 22, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

John W
Douglas, UK2,023 contributions
Friends
Been around for 300 years. Little slave boy catches pneumonia on landing. Dies and is buried in this remote spot. Grave marked with stone slab, bronze inscription and wood cross. Generations of school children have left tokens of remembrance.
Written November 27, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Barry M
Morecambe, UK24 contributions
Friends
Sunderland Point used to be the port for Lancaster. but this was in the days when a sailing ship would simply anchor at the side of the river and the tide would go out leaving the ship high and dry. To get to Sunderland Point means crossing a muddy causeway which is covered by the tide twice a day (If you aren't sure whether the tide is coming in or out take advise or don't go people get stranded and cars ruined every year). When you arrive at the Point you have to park on the foreshore and walk for there are no roads.
The Point itself is other worldly, difficult access means its virtually unchanged from its heyday as a port. Walk along the foreshore to the tip of the point and you pass the two terraces of what were fishermens cottages and a couple of large houses that were built by wealthy merchants. The views across the estuary are stunning you can clearly see whats left of Cockersands Abbey, Cockersands lighthouse and the port of Glasson which replaced Sunderland Point as the the port for Lancaster. When you reach the point of the peninsular continue up the other side for about half a mile and you'll find Sambo's Grave. It over looks Morecambe Bay and views from there are impressive. Sambo was a slave who its thought belonged to one of the wealthy merchants who lived at Sunderland Point. The area was heavily involved in the slave trade before its abolition so its thought Sambo was a house slave. He must have been well liked because the epitaph on his gravestone is poignant, contrasting his early life in the sunshine and his death in a colder place, although a little difficult to read because its quite eroded by wind and weather.
When you leave Sambo's grave continue along the footpath with Morecambe Bay on your left then turn right onto the narrow footpath that leads to the back fishermen's cottages.
Make sure you get the tide times right. If the tide has started to cover the road don't start out the water gets deeper very quickly.
Written July 10, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

BrianDerbyshire
Chorley, UK185 contributions
Family
A sad reminder of a past age, an age of slavery and cotton, trade with the americas - slaves shipped in from Africa on route to America - cotton back from America and rich tradesmen in Lancaster. Poor Sambo was part of this but stayed in on Lancaster -as no doubt a bit of a rich man's novelty - and sadly succombed to our damp harsh climate. The grave is a poignant reminder of those days - and the name Sambo is given in affection and not racist in any way. So if you are out at Sunderland Point take a minute to divert your eyes from the beautiful scenery and spare a thought for poor Sambo, miles away from home in his little grave!
Written June 20, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Andrew-Li-Suitor
Lancaster, UK6 contributions
Family
The grave of a poor black, out on the desolate English coast. I am Chinese myself, and find Britians willingness to explore the darker side of it's past to be moving and thoughtful. Not the best place to bring a date, but a nice walk to go and relax and contemplate. WRAP UP as it gets very cold in winter.
Written June 2, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

davidwilliambarnes
Blackpool, UK1,420 contributions
Couples
A lovely story of Sambo the ship Captains servant who came over from the West Indies and got left behind. His grave is quite easy to get to but be careful of the tides. Definitely worth a walk and a visit to the grave - very quirky.
Written February 19, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Showing results 1-10 of 96
Anything missing or inaccurate?
Suggest edits to improve what we show.
Improve this listing
Frequently Asked Questions about Sambo's Grave