Irish Jewish Museum
Irish Jewish Museum
4.5

Top ways to experience Irish Jewish Museum and nearby attractions

The area

Address
Neighborhood: South City Centre
How to get there
  • Harcourt • 7 min walk
  • Charlemont • 10 min walk
Reach out directly

See what travelers are saying

  • DJT230
    Chicago, Illinois40 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Highly Recommend
    Being blessed with two daughters who care about Judaism, we generally always stop at synagogues/Jewish museums on our travels. But rarely are we received so warmly and provided such an enthusiast and fascinating visit as we were here. Additionally, Yvonne, the vice Chair of the museum, was wonderful in helping to arrange a time for a visit that met our very tight schedule on a day they are not generally open, and Edwin gave my daughters and I a fascinating and informative tour. Its' really worth the time to visit here when in Dublin.
    Visited July 2023
    Written July 17, 2023
  • urbanguy
    Richmond, Virginia4,938 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Off the Beaten Path, But A Lot of History Here
    When we were there in September, their hours were very limited: Sundays, 10:30-4:30. There is quite a lot of memorabilia displayed. The two volunteers, one upstairs (Hilary) and one downstairs spent a lot of time chatting with us. This was a great visit.
    Visited September 2023
    Traveled as a couple
    Written December 31, 2023
  • elliebob297
    Bodmin, United Kingdom99 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Fascinating place
    We had never been to a synagogue, so as we were staying in Dublin we went by foot and Luas to visit, it took a while to find, as our map wasn't too great, but it was worth it. The content was very interesting, as were the volunteers we spoke to. The synagoge itself was well presented and full of content. The museum downstairs was in need of refreshing of the displays as some were tired looking and others had slipped from their position. It needed time and tlc and much could be achieved with some time spent on the presentation. Altogether though a worthwhile visit. We wish you the best of fortune in future.
    Visited June 2024
    Traveled as a couple
    Written July 2, 2024
These reviews are the subjective opinion of Tripadvisor members and not of TripAdvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

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4.5
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urbanguy
Richmond, VA4,938 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2023 • Couples
When we were there in September, their hours were very limited: Sundays, 10:30-4:30.

There is quite a lot of memorabilia displayed. The two volunteers, one upstairs (Hilary) and one downstairs spent a lot of time chatting with us.

This was a great visit.
Written December 31, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

paritz2
paris21 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
~ ~ If you didn’t know it was there, you’d be hard put to spot this small museum dedicated to preserving the history of the Jewish people here in Ireland.
It’s located at Walworth Road, a small street of terraced houses just off the main South Circular Road in Dublin, in what used to be the main Jewish area of the city.
Two of the small houses have been thrown together, and the only thing that distinguishes them from their neighbours is the small Hebrew plaque on the outside wall, and the fact that the windows are much longer than the other houses on the road.
~ ~ In fact, this used to be the main Jewish Synagogue here in Dublin.
Seemingly, one of the rules of the Orthodox Jewish religion is that members are obliged to walk to worship on a Saturday, (the Jewish Sabbath) and so when Dublin had a large Jewish minority living in this district, there were a fair number of smallish Synagogues dotted around the area, of which this was the largest.
The old Synagogue has been preserved for posterity, although it has not been used for religious services since the mid-1970’s. The whole building then fell into a state of disrepair, until the Museum opened its doors in 1984.
It was officially opened by the former President of Israel Dr. Chaim Herzog during an official State visit to Ireland. He is himself Irish born, and his father, Rabbi Herzog, still lives in the area, and is the First Rabbi of Ireland.

~ ~ There has been a Jewish presence here in Ireland for centuries, and the first ever recorded arrival is recorded here in the Museum, in an old document called the “Annals of Innisfallen”.
It was here on the south coast that five merchant Jews arrived by sea from Rouen in France in 1079. Incidentally, they were refused entry to the country. (Some things never change!)
The Museum traces the history of the Jewish Community through all the various migrations that took place, usually after persecutions in other parts of Europe.
Those who are interested in those persecutions can also look up the various newspaper cuttings from around the time of the Second World War, when various (and well known) Irish politicians of the time spouted some totally obnoxious anti-Semitic rants, which I’m sure they would not like to be reminded of today.
~ ~ Another interesting exhibit is a reconstruction of a 1920’s Dublin Jewish kitchen, laid out for “Hanukkah”, (the eight-day Jewish festival of lights held in December, which commemorates the rededication of the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem in 165BC after its desecration) with all the different and varied kosher foods represented. At one time it was the actual kitchen of the Museum’s curator.
Do try to get talking to the curator and the many volunteers who give freely of their time to maintain this little Museum, as their accents are a delight, and a pleasant mix of true Dublin along with many Jewish intonations.
There’s information here on all the Jewish writer’s and artists, as well as the various Jewish schools in the city, and Jewish youth organisations.
One of the best known novels of the 20th century, Ulysses by James Joyce, has as its hero a Dublin Jew called Leopold Bloom, and he has his own section here in the Museum. Blooms actual house is situated only five minutes walk away, at 52, Upper Clanbrassil Street.

~ ~ The Museum is only about twenty minutes walk from the city centre, or you can get a bus and ask to be let off at the “Garda Club”, (police) which is just around the corner from Walworth Road.
If you’d like to have a closer look at the old synagogue, and some other photographs of the Museum, then here is a good link for you to click on. http://www.cs.tufts.edu/~zblocker/ijm/pics.html
Admission is free.
Written October 10, 2010
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

paulbishop86
Orange, CA5 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2013 • Couples
My wife and I entered expecting to spend only a half hour or so but we were drawn for 1.5 hrs in by the unique exhibits and extremely welcoming guides. It's common to look at Ireland in terms of Catholic and Protesant traditions so learning about the small but significant Jewish community is wonderful. Highly worth a visit.
Written August 20, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Chappaqua3
Chappaqua, NY93 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2014 • Family
This small museum in a residential area was a highlight of our trip to Dublin. The people running the museum walked around the small exhibit with us, giving us detailed accounts of each aspect of Dublin Jewish life. It was wonderful to hear their insights. The museum is housed in an old synagogue that is no longer active, but you can visit the sanctuary which is upstairs. Although this is a very small museum mostly filled with artifacts and newspaper articles of daily Dublin Jewish life, we spent a considerable amount of time there. A must for any Jewish visitor to Dublin or anyone interested in a little known aspect of Irish life.
Written July 20, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Muzikteach
Philadelphia, PA4 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2013 • Couples
This museum is the ground floor of one of the few remiaining Shula in Ireland. The docents are not just people who greet you at the door, they are Jews who share their knowledge of this community....THEIR COMMUNITY. It was moving....and a touching way to touch with Ireland's Jewish roots.
Written July 26, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Susan W
Fair Oaks, CA166 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2014 • Couples
This museum (and synagogue) is tucked away - easy to miss. Since I wasn't aware that there was any sizable Jewish presence in Irish history, this was a good eye-opener for me. It's staffed solely by volunteers who love their work and who enjoy talking with visitors.
Written June 7, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Susan60898
Atlanta, GA24 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2013 • Couples
This is a hidden gem. Learned so much about the relatively small, but strong Irish Jewish community in Dublin. The volunteers were so helpful and the displays were wonderful. You are also able to visit the orthodox shul which is on the second floor of the museum.
Written October 24, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

HeatherHawkes
Loughton, UK86 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2013 • Couples
Having been told by bus drivers of 9, 16, 68, 68A, 122, they did not go there, despite showing these the correct buses for the museum in the guide book & showing them the map, eventually a driver recognised the area off the S. Circular Rd., told us where the Victoria St. stop was & we followed the map to Walworth Rd. where we found the house closed, rang the bell & a charming man came to the door to show us around. Only this one man - I should have asked his name. Downstairs was lots of photos, pictures, information, an old kitchen with old products & Sabbath candles on the table. The man explained all about this as we walked around. Different things at different times. Then we went upstairs which was really fascinating. Used to be the Synagogue, separate seats for men & women, had the Torah's in an ark, a Chuppah with a model bride & groom standing under it with a bag containing the broken glass broken by the groom. There is also a section which I found really fascinating. A glass display which starts with birth & explains about the Bris, showing the blades used. Also information about it but what surprised me was saying that women as well as men could perform this Mitzvah. Up till now I only knew men/Mohels could perform this? Then there was a section for weddings, showing the Ketubah, English marriage certificate & other interesting information, then death showing a death certificate & books used for prayers. Also on display an empty torah case used by the Sephardi. A really fascinating place to visit. Take your time. I was visiting with my husband & adult son so fortunately had the man all to ourselves as no other visitors were there. Museum open from 1st May Sunday to Thurs. You should allow at least 1hour because seeing some of the artefacts as well as old black & white photos which have lasted well over the years will stop you rushing.
My only concern is that this poor man was being bothered by one of his neighbours about the museum being there. Hope it stays, well worth a visit. Thank you for showing us around. Just to say when we left I made a special note of the buses that go here & they are as what was said at the start.
Written May 5, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Pauline A
Dublin, Ireland28 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2013 • Solo
This museum is currently in two houses and whilst it has many artefacts, the real gem is the synagogue upstairs which is original. There are plans to expand the museum into 3 more adjoining houses and develop a basement. On the way to the museum, there is much literature about the impact this development will have on the lives of the local community. There is also a reference to taking apart the original synagogue and rebuilding it. The real charm of this museum is its authenticity which will be lost into a modern and soulless structure. The scale of the development (6 times current size) will be wrong for what is a residential area. Maybe worth going there while it is still charming. There are lots of good cafes in the area and also a kosher bakery!
Written August 8, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

globeseeker007
globeseeker0073,257 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2013 • Couples
When we visited this museum, there was a sign outside stating that it was open and to ring the bell for service. We did and the door was promptly opened. This museum is filled with all types of information on Jewish life in Ireland. There are numerous photographs, letters, and other information which provide interesting insight into how Jewish people live and have coped with life throughout the last century. There is a section on antisemitism and how Jews were treated in Ireland in years past. Another section covers senior citizens while others cover sports, marriage, etc. The first floor contains this information along with posters and paintings in the hallway and along the staircase. The second floor contains a synagogue and also has books and other items pertaining to the Jewish religion. There is no fee for this attraction but donations are accepted.
Written June 10, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Irish Jewish Museum - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (2024)

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