Walltown Crags - Hadrian's Wall

Walltown Crags - Hadrian's Wall

Walltown Crags - Hadrian's Wall
4.5
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About
Built by the Roman Emporer Hadrian in AD 122, the remnants of this ancient wall stretches 73 miles from Wallsend-on-Tyne to Bowness-on-Solway. This is one of the finest places to see Hadrian's Wall, where it snakes and dives through dramatic countryside along the crags of the Whin Sill. Not only is the Wall itself especially well preserved here, but it also shows how the soldiers who built it coped with the presence of large outcrops of natural rock - sometimes incorporating it into the Wall, and sometimes almost butting up against it. At one end is Walltown turret, which unusually was first built as a free standing tower. Following the path from the NNP car park, there is a small climb to the site across uneven turf. The site is very exposed with no shelter. There is a Northumberland National Parks car park nearby. NNP charges apply. Farm livestock is likely to be present on the path.
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jersey45
Bristol, UK213 contributions
Oct 2021
We walked from the Roman Army Museum to Walltown Crags on the path through the trees till we reached Hadrian's Wall. The view of the wall and surrounding area was stunning.
It really showed how the wall must have been and the children loved it. They were impressed and were glad we walked from the museum to see it.
Best to see after a visit to the museum as it will bring history to life.
Written November 15, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

telecaster428
Wakefield, UK232 contributions
Sep 2022
We picked Walltown Crags as the place to visit Hadrian's Wall after reading other reviews. It is quite a steep walk up to the crag but the remains of the tower and the view of the wall are excellent. You can either park in the Walltown Country Park car park or there is a narrow lane to drive along which gets you nearer to the wall. Well worth a visit.
Written September 25, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Thank you for your visit and review. This is one of the finest places to see Hadrian's Wall, where it snakes and dives through dramatic countryside along the crags of the Whin Sill. Not only is the Wall itself especially well preserved here, but it also shows how the soldiers who built it coped with the presence of large outcrops of natural rock - sometimes incorporating it into the Wall, and sometimes almost butting up against it. At one end is Walltown turret, which unusually was first built as a free standing tower. We hope you get the opportunity to visit other sites Nicky - English Heritage
Written October 10, 2022
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Ermintrade
Newcastle upon Tyne, UK26 contributions
Jun 2017
As a site guide at Chesters Roman Fort I am often asked where are the best places to see Hadrian's Wall. So I am going to make 4 suggestions, in my order of preference:
1/ Cawfields. This is a car park about 6 miles west of Housesteads Fort. Turn down the little road opposite the Milecastle Inn. At the car park, walk east along a gravelled path for 5 minutes and you will find Milecastle 42 and a good stretch of Wall to walk beside.
2/ Birdoswald. This is a fort about 12 miles west of Housesteads. There is a good car park and a long stretch of Hadrian's Wall. If you look very hard you might find a phallic symbol and an inscribed centurial stone on the Wall. Of course, you can also visit the fort!
3/ Steel Rigg. This car park is along a road about 3 miles west of Housesteads Fort. Turn up the road opposite the new National Park Visitor Centre. Hadrian's Wall is three minutes walk from the car-park. This is also the nearest car-park to get to the famous Sycamore Gap - walk east along the Roman Military Way if you do not want to face a moderate climb up some stone steps.
4/ Walltown Quarry. This car park is about 9 miles west of Housesteads. You can walk east following the national trail for about 20 minutes, including a walk up a steepish slope, to get to a wonderful stretch of Wall that weaves past rocky outcrops to the remains of a Turret. You can combine this visit with a visit to the excellent Roman Army Museum nearby.

Written June 17, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

emilee l
Cherry Hill, NJ367 contributions
My husband and I planned a five-day walking trip of Hadrian's Wall for June 2002. There are tour companies which will arrange such walks, but I wanted to save money and do it myself. What I didn't want to do was carry a backpack. After considerable reading, we decided on a route that would start in Brampton (Cumbria) and end at Housesteads. To accomplish this, we stayed at three bed and breakfasts: Oval House in Brampton, Hill on the Wall near Birdoswald, and Gibbs Hill Farm near Vindolanda. All were just fine but Hill on the Wall was simply amazing.
Elaine, the owner is incredible. We arrived quite tired and she greeted us on a lovely front patio and delivered tea and bisquits before we even had a chance to remove our muddy boots. We stayed there for two nights (using the Hadrian's Wall bus to assist us with backtracking).
We ate dinner at Hill both nights; the food was fabulous and the service (think freshly ironed linen napkins) lovely. Our bedroom was great and Elaine and her husband Bill were a thoughtful, but never overbearing, presence. Most importantly, Hill on the Wall offers a luggage transfer service. They picked up our luggage from our first bed and breakfast and delivered it to our third. Without this, we could not have accomplished this five-day walk. By the way, walking Hadrian's Wall is a wonderful experience; the terrain is interesting and the history fascinating.
Written February 24, 2004
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

David H
Newcastle upon Tyne, UK14 contributions
Sep 2014 • Friends
I live about a mile south of Hadrians Wall near the site of Rudchester roman fort and have been to every part of the wall over the last 30 years or so, including running the length of most of it non stop about ten years ago. Starting at the Solway (western) end - there is not much to see for the first 10 to 15 miles except quite an open expanse of estuary - the Hadrians Wall path starts here and is completely flat and featureless for about ten miles. Once into the area near Carlisle, there are a few sections that can be seen, but by far the most impressive bit is on the bleak and exposed outcrop of the Whin SIll near Once Brewed and Twice Brewed (yes - they are real places!). The Car park at Steel Rigg is virtually on the wall and the walk from there along to the sycamore tree (of infamous 'Robin Hood' fame) is worth doing as is the longer walk along to the top of Crag Lough and then Housesteads. The wall is only a maximum of about 6 ft high (much to the disappointment of some tourists), but it threads it's way through beautiful scenery and it is possible to see just what a great feat of engineerng it was. Vindolanda and Housesteads are the undoubted tourist highlights but there are a few other places that are less well known and equally compelling. Vindolanda is remarkale in that there have been some Roman items preserved that are unique including materials such as paper and leather which have been preserved in the acid soils. A roman party invitation is one such relic. One place I really like is Broccolita fort which is less visited, especially if you walk about 200m from the car park and signed, but out of sight, is the remains of the Mithraeum (temple) which is completely open to the public (and sheep!) and has the original altar stones still there (usually with some modern day offerings atop them such as empty water bottles or sweets). There are some sections of wall that you can access easily between Chesters and Housesteads as well - look out for stones in the wall with numbers on - these are now very rare (and they probably make up the walls of several barns in the area) but they were placed every 80 feet or so to mark the number of the 'platoon' or 'century' that built that section. Towards Newcastle there are further sections to see near Chollerford and then towards Heddon on the Wall , where there is quite a lot of stone from the wall built into the church, which is at least 1200 years old. There is also a roman arch used in the building of the church in Corbridge. The Roman town of Coria is just along the river bank from Corbridge and was the site of the most important find of roman silver possibly in Europe. The Corbridge Lanx (a solid silver engraved tray) was found by a 9 year old girl walking along the river bank in the 18th century. More recently (in the last two years) the foundations of the original roman bridge over the Tyne have been excavated and it is possible to trace (on Google Earth as well as the map) the routes of roman roads that led to and from the town on the 'Stanegate' and 'Dere Street'. At Rudchester there is nothing left to see as it was excavated in the 1930s and then covered up again but there is an intriguing Roman cistern cut into the rock on private land nearby and in 1792 there was a hoard of roman coins unearthed from the top of 'Turpin's Hill' which is now underneath a farmhouse to the north. The road that follows the wall most closely (the Military road) was built in the 18th century to allow the movement of troops quickly across to Carlisle and the road itself in many sections is a listed monument as it is built on top of a layer of Roman stone which of course was handily available from the wall nearby. The Vallum (ditch and earthworks) which went alongside the wall can be seen in many places including by the cafe called 'Vallum' which is near 'Wallhouses'. At the junction of the old roman 'Dere Street' (now the A68 ) and the wall, is a great pub - The Errngton Arms. Well worth a visit either at the end or start of a walk along the course of the wall.
Written December 28, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

JayS1
Peachtree City, GA247 contributions
Aug 2011 • Friends
Me and a friend just hiked about 2 miles of Hadrian's Wall, It has been the highlight of my time here!! The wall is AMAZING. We hiked from the STEEL RIGG car park near the town of Cawburn and Once-Brewed (sometimes known as Twice-Brewed.)

Here you can access the Sycamore tree used in the filming of Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves. Its about a mile from the car-park but the hike there is Awesome!! You hike along a very intact Hadrian's wall and there is some kind of ancient outpost that juts out from the wall. There are also very high cliffs that in some places are literally right next to the trail so be careful with kids. There also is a small lake called "Crag Lough".

The car park is 3 pounds for all day. So Hadrian's wall is really awesome. I really enjoyed this section of the wall. If you only have a limited time, i would recommend this section! There are a couple of castles in the area too: Thirlwall castle is pretty cool from the 1300s.
Written August 10, 2011
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

292bob
Stafford, UK527 contributions
Oct 2014 • Couples
This is not strictly a review it is an overview of the World Heritage Site of Hadrian's Wall . As a visit will need planning if you want to get the most from your trip. This simple overview of the monument might help.

Hadrian s Wall is huge it is 74 miles long so if you want to visit all of this unique monument you will need a week or more.
In the real world most of us will have only have a few days, so not disrepair you just need to plan your trip. This is only an overview so you know what is there and help you pick sites for your visit(s). It is essential to refer to the websites to fill in the details of individual sites before you travel.

A description of the wall
Hadrian's Wall runs west to east it starts at Bowness - Roman name Maia, on the west coast and ending at South Shields - Roman name Arbeia in the east.
We call it Hadrian's Wall the Romans probably called it the Vallum Aelium, or the Aelian frontier.
The forts that were built on the wall are numbered 1 to 15, in order west to east. The vital supporting forts are numbered F1 to F4. Those in the best state of preservation are marked with a * .
The layout of the wall starting at the western end are as follows,

1. Bowness on Solway,(Maia) (this also was a Roman fleet depot).
2. Drumburgh, (Coggabata)
3. Burgh by Sands, (Aballava)
4. Stanwix, (Uxelodunum) near the River Eden. 
F1 Stanegate Fort Carlisle  (Luguvalium)
5. Castlesteads, (Camboglanna)
6. Birdoswald, ( Banna)*
F2 Stanegate Fort Carvoian,  (Magnis)
7. Great Chesters, (Aescia)
F3 Stanegate Fort Chesterholm,  (Vindolanda) *
8. Housesteads,  (Vercovicium)
9. Carrawburgh, ( Brocolitia)
10. Chesters, (Cilurnum) on a river Tyne crossing*
11. Halton Chesters,  (Onnum)
F4 Stanegate Fort Corbridge, ( Corstopitum)  *
12. Rudchester,  (Vindobala)
13. Benwell Hill, (Condercum) on the river Tyne,
14. Wallsend,  (Pons Aelius) known by the Romans as the Bridge of Hadrian*
15. Arbeia the last installation on the wall it was a Roman naval depot.

The forts of Carlisle, Carovian, Chesterholm and Corbridge were possibly the most important part of the walls defensive system but not on the actual wall. They are strategically placed along what is known as the Stanegate Roman Road. These are large garrison forts strategically placed to provide rapid reinforcement to the garrisons in the wall forts.

The forts listed below are those considered to be in the best condition today,and will have some visitor facilities.
Stanegate Fort Chesterholm -  (Vindolanda)
Stanegate Fort Corbridge -  (Corstopitum) 
Birdoswald - (Banna)
Housesteads -  (Vercovicium)
Chesters -  (Cilurnum) on the river Tyne crossing
Wallsend -  (Pons Aelius) known by the Romans as the Bridge of Hadrian.

In the hope this information is helpful enjoy your trip.
Written August 23, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Wastenator
Venice, Italy255 contributions
Jul 2011 • Solo
I walked Hadrian's Wall path for two days last year (2010) and was so impressed that I determined to return to undertake the entire coast-to-coast walk this year. Google helped me to find a tour operator. I chose Contours Walking holidays. They offered a range of tours and I went for the longest - 10 days (11 nights) - because I did not want to rush this experience or wear myself out by walking too fast and far each day. I started on 13 July at Whitley Bay at a great B & B - Oaktree Lodge. A positive way to start the walk. The first two days of the walk is mainly through Newcastle riverside suburbs - pretty enough but not much of the actual Wall. apart from the Segedunum fort at Wallsend. If you enjoy looking around ruins and museums then I would suggest that you purchase a 7-day (21.50Pounds Sterling (BP)) or 14-day (26.50BP) from English Heritage at the beginning of the walk. This is only available to overseas visitors. There are many sites along the route which cost from 4 to 6 BP each. I actually paid 5BP to enter Carlisle Castle towards the end of the tour which was well worth the money. My large (17Kgs maximum weight) suitcase was transferred efficiently from each location and was always there when I arrived at my next destination. If you only have a short time and want to spend some time really walking beside Hadrian's Wall then I recommend that you start at Housesteads and you can finish at Banks. However, I wanted to complete the whole 85+ miles. Do not miss the Robin Hood tree at Milking Gap - It is a beautiful spot. That day's walking is very hilly and particularly challenging, especially in the rain. I found the distances each day to be perfect for me. They varied from 5 to 11 miles. At the end of each day a hot bath or shower seemed to fix everything! I respect the youngsters which I saw along the route who were carrying their tents and camping! The accommodation along the route was mainly 4 star B& B/Hotels and was generally very satisfactory and comfortable. I will do separate reviews for each place. I was surprised how few people I met along the Walk - going either way. People kept saying that by going East to West I was against the prevailing wind but I would not have liked to finish with the Newcastle section and I am very happy to be in the peace and quiet of the Solway Firth area as I finish this interesting and well-marked Path. It was easy for me to follow the Hadrian's Wall Path, even as a solo traveller as it is clearly marked with a white acorn symbol. If you are not a good map reader you do not need to worry. I recommend taking a good map of the entire Walk though - just in case! The views of the Northumberland and Cumberland countryside are spectacular. The Wall itself which was built in AD122 is amazingly well-preserved in parts. Another item crossed off my bucket list! Be aware that much of the path passes through fields with grazing large animals - sheep, cows etc, I had no problems at all but if you are nervous of animals, I would recommend that you take an umbrella or walking poles. The animals are used to people walking through and do not produce a threat. The website http://www.hadrians-wall.org/ is very helpful.

Tips for preparing for the Hadrian's Wall Path:
1. Wear comfortable and waterproof walking boots.
2. Take poles if you are a little wobbly! I did not have walking poles and there were times when I would have appreciated them.
3. Take excellent wet weather gear. This is England! I wore an all over poncho over waterproof trousers and Regatta waterproof and windproof jacket and still was drenched on a couple of days. We do not come to England for the weather! Even in July it has been very wet.
4. If you are able, take enough time to enjoy the walk and the scenery and sites.
5. Take a camera.
6. There are very few toilets along the route so go when you have the opportunity!
Written July 23, 2011
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

florence1977
Nannerch, UK30 contributions
May 2012 • Friends
A group of six of us have just finished walking the length of the wall. It was a fantastic week! Good company, fantastic views and great people on the way. We used Walker' Bags to transport our bags. They were great, bags picked up and dropped off every time with no problem. We stayed at BB's on route as close to the wall as possible; Keelman's Lodge, Newcastle; The Dovecote Humshaugh, Twice Brewed Hexham, Hill on the Wall Gilsland, Newtown Farm and Vallum Barn near Brampton; and Rosemount Cottage Burgh by sands. All lovely places to stay. (reviews done but not able to review Rosemount and Newtown as yet as I am first reviewer) Newtown Farm and Rosemount Cottage both gave us lifts to places where we could get food, very grateful to them. We used LA taxis to take us from the Keelmans to Wallsend on the first day and they provided a 7 seater for £24. We use beeline taxis in Carlisle to take us from Bowness on Solway to Carlisle station for £24 where we caught the train to Prudhoe where we got a local taxi to take us back to the Keelmans. Would highly recommend the walk. You arent walking next to the wall all the way and there are only certain stretches where it is visible for any length of time, however the surrounding scenery is great and the walk from Wallsend through the regenerated it Newcastle is a real eye opener.
Written May 30, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

followingthehorizon
London, UK8 contributions
Aug 2014 • Friends
Salve viatores!

Long ago, when I was a mere girl, my parents took me and my brother to the heart of the North York Moors, where we fell in stinging nettles, freaked out at the expanse of sky and never-ending horizon, climbed massive rock formations sprouting out of the gorse and gleefully presented sheep jawbones to our patient grandmother. We stayed in the region for about a week, running riot through the moorland and tucking into hearty Yorkshire grub in the evenings. On the penultimate day I found myself walking along this wide road, made up of giant sandstone slabs. The slabs were worn, and moss and nature had pushed it's way through the cracks between them. But it was a magnificent thing. It carried on for miles and miles, cutting a straight, unbroken path across the land. As we walked my mother told me it was a Roman road, laid hundreds of years beforehand, used by soldiers, tradesman, farmers and anyone who was crossing the moors.

I see that place in my mind's eye all the time. I remember the slabs, prefacing the immense horizon. I remember the road, dividing the wild flatlands around it, like a beacon shining it's light through the night, guiding the lost until they are found. I can't forget it, I can't forget the fact that it is essentially the past still here in the present. A direct link to a previous world, a previous Britain.

Earlier this year, as you know, Scotland nearly voted to depart from the UK. In the event it didn't happen, but back in August it was still a possibility. Since the two countries that I have split my life between were possibly on the bring of separation I thought it would be a good time to return to Roman Britain, not to the moors this time but to an equally impressive place, known as Hadrian's Wall. This is the ancient borderline which once acted as the boundary between the colonised Britons and the fiercely independent tribes of the north. I phoned some friends, booked some time off work, and headed to The North for a week of walking and invigorating Cumbrian air!

Things To Know About Hadrian's Wall:
It's the largest ancient monument in northern Europe.
It was constructed in AD122 by the Emperor Hadrian to mark the northern reaches of the Roman Empire.
There were 16 forts along the wall, the remains of which can still be seen today. Each one could house 800 soldiers and comprised a prison, hospital, bakery and stables.
It's definitely haunted.
The Sycamore Gap, a tree just east of Milecastle 39, was made famous by Kevin Costner in the 1991 film Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves. My God, that's 23 years ago...

Things To Know About Walking The Wall
Hadrian's Wall National Trail is 84 miles long and the prevailing wind is west to east (from June to September winds are supposed to be fairly light - however there is a mighty section known as the Crags and in August this year it was blowing a fair gale up there).
It is possible to walk it in 6 days (we did it in 8 which was more than enough time, I would recommend aiming for 7 if it is your first long walk).
The route is clearly marked with the National Trail acorn symbols and waymark arrows.

Possible Route #1:
If you are going from west to east the route begins in Cumbria, in a small town called Bowness-on-Solway. Nearby are such famous and infamous places as Gretna and Lockerbie. This is the route I took with my friends - we met at Carlisle station and paid £10 for a friendly taxi driver to take us the 20 minutes or so to our first B&B at Bowness-On-Solway.
From Bowness-on-Solway the route traverses the north of England, via:

Carlisle - recommend the Sweet Dream Cake Company on Lowther Street (near the bus station) after your first day of walking (our walk was largely planned around cake stops).
Walton - Milecastle 56 (one of the forts situated at Roman-mile intervals along the wall)
Haltwhistle - just beforehand you will reach Birdoswald Fort (apparently you can get good cake here but I wouldn't know because we had a picnic and I cracked open the prosecco I'd been carrying with me for miles)
Once Brewed - mysteriously significant (no Googling!)
Chollerford - site of Chesters Fort (best preserved cavalry fort in Britain)
Corbridge - wooden writing tablets found here
Heddon-on-the-Wall - Milecastle 12

It ends on the northeast coast of England, in Wallsend (Wall's End!), North Tyneside. Here lies the most completely excavated fort in Britain, Segedunum.

Possible Route #2
If you are going from east to west the route begins in Wallsend and is the reverse of the west to east route.

Accommodation: we stayed in B&Bs and hostels which was quite pricey really, but that was the decision we made. You can camp for much cheaper of course, and if you carry and cook your own food I'm sure you can do it for tuppence.
There are several baggage transfer companies which will save your backs in your old age (sorry, I'm speaking for myself, here). We used Walkers' and they charged me £5 a day because there were three of us (rather than £7): http://www.walkersbags.co.uk

We paid for 8 nights of accommodation and 7 days of baggage transfer (because we had one rest day where we stayed at the same place two nights, therefore negating the need for any baggage pick up or drop off). The total for these services was about £250. However there was an additional cost for food which I calculated to be about £20 a day, more if you like your alcohol. My total cost estimation was £430 for a 9 day holiday, not including transport to and from Carlisle and Newcastle. It worked out to approximately £48 a day, which is in fact £2 less than most guidebooks tell you to budget for!

We went in August, from Monday 11th to Tuesday 19th. I would say the final 3 days were a bit of a drag (excuse the pun). We could have done more miles on the Sunday and finished on the Monday. See below for our route and information about where we stayed. If you want any further details get in touch with me, I can tell you loads more than I've written here.

The-Day-Before Day
Bowness on Solway
Accommodation: Wallsend Guest House, The Old Rectory, Bowness on Solway, Wigton, Cumbria CA7 5AF - Tel: 016973 51055
£33 per person, family room
http://www.wallsend.net/

Day 1
Bowness on Solway - Burgh by Sands - Carlisle (13 miles)
Accommodation: Cartref Guest House, 44 Victoria Place, Carlisle CA1 1EX - Tel: 01228 523077
£35 per person
4 minute walk to restaurant / pub
http://www.discovercarlisle.co.uk/Carlisle-Cartref-Guest-House/details/?dms=3&pid=5031180

Day 2
Carlisle - Walton (Brampton) (11 miles)
Accommodation: Sandysike House, Walton, Cumbria CA8 2DU - Tel: 01697 72330
£18 per person
3 miles to restaurant / pub
http://www.visithadrianswall.co.uk/accommodation/sandysike-bunkhouse-p1152911

Day 3
Walton - Haltwhistle (14 miles)
Accommodation: Greenhead Hostel, Greenhead, Brampton, Carlisle, Cumbria CA8 7HB - Tel: 01697 747411
£25 per person - 6 bed dorm in the bunkhouse
Food served until 8.30pm
http://www.greenheadhotelandhostel.co.uk/
Be aware the Greenhead Hostel is about 6 miles from Haltwhistle “town” (Middle Of Britain, don’t you know?) and not that well connected. There is a bus from the main road - ask at the pub. Other than that there is a taxi company, but you're not in Kansas anymore - make sure he's not out drinking with his mates, or he won't come and get you!

Day 4
Haltwhistle
Accommodation: Greenhead Hostel, Greenhead, Brampton, Carlisle, Cumbria CA8 7HB - Tel: 01697 747411
£18.75 per person - 6 bed dorm in the bunkhouse
Food served until 8.30pm
http://www.greenheadhotelandhostel.co.uk/hostel/hostel.htm

Day 5
Haltwhistle - Hexham 15 miles
Accommodation: Queensgate House, Queensgate Cockshaw, Hexham, Northumberland, NE46 3QU - Tel: 01434 605592
£25 per person
Restaurants / pubs everywhere in Hexham
http://www.tripadvisor.co.uk/Hotel_Review-g186351-d2490357-Reviews-Queensgate_House-Hexham_Northumberland_England.html
I think the owner will soon be shutting her business, unfortunately because this is proper English B&B at it's best. But Hexham has a lot of guesthouse accommodation, just make sure you book in advance if there's a lot of you.

Day 6
Hexham - East Wallhouses (10 miles)
Accommodation: Robin Hood Pub, West Military Road, East Wallhouses, Corbridge, Northumberland NE18 0LL - Tel: 01434 672273
£30 per person - 1 room with 2 single beds / 1 room with 1 double bed
Food served until 8.45pm
http://www.robinhoodinn-militaryroad.co.uk/Pages/default.aspx
Do not stay here. That is all. Stay at Matfen High House B&B.

Day 7 - Monday 18th
East Wallhouse - Newburn (8 miles)
Accommodation: Keelman's Lodge, Grange Road, Newburn, Newcastle upon Tyne, Tyne and Wear NE15 8NL - Tel: 0191 2671689 / 0191 2677766
http://keelmanslodge.co.uk/

Day 8 - Tuesday 19th
Newburn - Wallsend/South Shields, Newcastle (10 miles)
NB: If you request it your baggage transfer company will drop your bags off at Hadrian's Wall Lodge in Wallsend, which is just a stop or two away on the metro from Segedunum (Segedunum is the Roman fort "at the end of the wall" so to speak, although you could continue onto South Shields but we didn't because we'd had enough of the intense industrial smells from the Tyne!)

Ave atque vale!
Written October 12, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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