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The Geological Society

8 Reviews
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The Geological Society

8 Reviews
Sorry, there are no tours or activities available to book online for the date(s) you selected. Please choose a different date.
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Burlington House Piccadilly, London W1J 0BD England
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Ghosts, Ghouls & Gallows: London Virtual Tour
Historical & Heritage Tours

Ghosts, Ghouls & Gallows: London Virtual Tour

254 reviews
Discover the haunted side of London on a virtual ghost tour that reveals haunted houses, cemeteries, and harrowing historic tales. A great way to learn more about London without leaving the security of your own home, this tour includes an array of interesting details from your guide. Plus, interactive quizzes keep you engaged and ensure you don’t get bored. All tour times are in the British Summer Time timezone.
$6.99 per adult
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T R E K wrote a review Dec 2019
London, United Kingdom236 contributions93 helpful votes
Passed by here for a quick introductory tour and a lunchtime lecture with the Royal Astronomical Society, brilliant building the library looked really cozy as well, and its all live streamed. check it out
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Date of experience: December 2019
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Steve B wrote a review Oct 2019
4 contributions
Dropped in to see Smith's map and go into the Library to get a buzz from the literature. The map was protected from sunlight and the curtains were parted for me.Helpful staf.
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Date of experience: September 2019
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Endymion1821 wrote a review Jan 2019
London, United Kingdom63 contributions32 helpful votes
Enter via the door opposite Fortnum & Mason and be prepared for a realm of inspiration. Greeted by the delightful lady on reception, we enquired if we could view the "Map that changed the world". The charming lady immediately obliged and pulled back the curtain on history. The map intoxicates you. It is simply magnificent. Background information was provided, including a colour handout crammed with information. The building is a splendid space. We were invited to visit the library on the First floor and duly did so, resplendent in shiny "visitor" badges. The Library is beautifully appointed and houses a magnificent collection. Additionally, there was an amazing display of minerals & rock formations from all over the British Isles. The staff were welcoming and exceptionally helpful. As an added bonus, we were able to witness the chiming of the Fortnum & Mason clock at 3.00pm from the unusual vantage point we never dreamed of accessing. This is a truly wondrous space and deserves a visit.
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Date of experience: January 2019
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ribo522 wrote a review Jan 2019
Los Angeles, California56 contributions7 helpful votes
Unless you’ve read the MAP THAT CHANGED the WORLD, you would never know that Behind the green velvet curtain lies the world’s first geological map! Have you ever read a book that sent you on an adventure? The Map That Changed the World by Simon Winchester is that kind of book. In 1815, after years of surveying for the Somerset Coal Canal in England, southwest of Bath, Smith observed and confirmed that the layers (stratigraphy)of rocks repeated across the terrain. He had made similar observations in otger areas pf England. He also noticed the fossils in the layers were different as he excavated through those layers. From his observations he created the world’s first Geological Map and became known as the father of modern geology. Aside from the detail in this hand drawn map and the history behind it, what’s interesting is that it’s hidden behind a green velvet curtain in the lobby of the Geological Society’s lobby. To see it, just ask the secretary for a viewing . She will ceremoniously stand and pull open he cord to reveal the hand-painted map. It’s marvelous! For anyone interested in maps and their stories, this does not dissapoint.
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Date of experience: June 2018
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BackpackerNoMore62 wrote a review Oct 2018
Seattle, Washington1,849 contributions113 helpful votes
London is filled with artifacts that hold great historical significance, objects like the Rosetta Stone that helped to unlock the secrets of Ancient Egypt. William Smith's map of the geology of England gave birth to the science of geology, so it definitely qualifies. But unlike the Rosetta Stone, the map sits in a seldom visited sight where one can view it in peace and leisure.
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Date of experience: September 2018
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