Temple Bar Memorial
Temple Bar Memorial
4
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The area
Neighborhood: Holborn
Inner London’s busiest streets crisscross quiet cobbled lanes for an effect that can be urbane or quaint – or an intriguing blend of both – depending on the particular corner you turn. Due to its especially convenient location, bustling Holborn hosts an excellent range of hotels, eateries, and shops to suit practically any taste or budget. With major attractions like the British Museum and Somerset House as well as popular areas such as Covent Garden and Soho all just a short walk away, Holborn is a smart base from which to explore London.
How to get there
  • Temple • 5 min walk
  • Chancery Lane • 7 min walk

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

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Popular mentions

4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles46 reviews
Excellent
9
Very good
29
Average
8
Poor
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phat_dawg_21
Alpharetta, GA13,464 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2022
The Temple Bar Memorial stands in front of the Royal Courts of Justice building. On top is a Dragon bearing a shield of the Coat of Arms of the City of London. The Dragon is often mistakenly thought to be a Griffin, which is a symbol of the City of London.
Written October 6, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

BradJill
Hong Kong, China159,680 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2013 • Couples
Right in front of the Royal Courts of Justice, you can find the Temple Bar Memorial, a structure of important historic relevance. The monument rests in the middle of the road where Fleet Street becomes The Strand. It also famously marks the boundary between Westminster and the City of London. The Temple Bar takes it name from nearby Temple Church.

Historically, there are records of a bar being in place here as early as 1293. Arched structures often occupied this spot over the centuries. During the Peasant's revolt of 1381 the bar was destroyed.

Later, during the middle ages, a long standing wooden structure was in place until after the Great Fire of 1666. While it escaped damage from this tragedy, it was determined by King Charles to rebuild the structure as part of the city rebuilding that followed the Great Fire.

Commissioned by the king, Sir Christopher Wren then build an arched passageway between 1669-1672 that was known as Wren's Temple Bar Gate. This attractive structure remained until 1878, when it was dismantled and removed due to the need to widen the street.

The current Temple Bar marker was then built in 1880. It is a Neo-Renaissance style base supporting a pedestal, which features statues of Queen Victoria and the Prince of Wales on either side. The pedestal is also surrounded by reliefs depicting the Royals last entry through the old Wren Gate. Perched upon the pedestal is a dragon, the symbol of the city of London.

In the end, we very much like the Temple Bar Memorial and the City of London dragon which sits steadfast in the middle of Fleet Street (The Stand). It makes a nice attraction to see when visiting this part of London.
Written January 30, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

raoulhood
Towson, MD3,130 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2015 • Solo
Temple Bar for the City of London is the main entrance from the City of Westminster.
The first notice of it is dated in 1293 ounces Belonging to the Knights Templars. It was a timber structure and after the fire of London (1666) was re-erected in 1672 on
The term "bar" Refers to a "barrier" across the route and rapresents one of the last points of walls of Londondon known as "the Liberties of London."

If you move from inside the Arch 10 steps on left side, you find under a porch Blue Label: this is the place in cui ancients Masons and speculative Masaons decided to unite and to form the Grand Lodge of England. The site is especially revered by the members of the oldest non-religious Institution in the World.
Written September 26, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

WMIM
Horsham, UK3,231 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2014 • Friends
This review site is for the Temple Bar Memorial, NOT the Temple Bar itself. The previous reviewer has described the latter which is now near St. Paul's Cathedral, so try not to be confused by that errant review.
Other previous reviewers have described this monument and its history so I have no need to repeat their words, except to say that it is named so because of Temple Church nearby, which also lends its name to the wider area.
Very few people seem to notice this memorial, which is a pity. I always take a look when I walk by or travel by on the top deck of a bus.
Written March 16, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

BigHugh51
Adelaide, Australia3,651 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2019
Our most recent stay in London saw us again take a number of enjoyable long walks through the city’s central area. One of those walks took us along the Strand and Fleet Street from Trafalgar Square to St. Paul’s Cathedral. As we made our way along the streets, we encountered a number of interesting sights.
One of those sights which we had encountered before during a previous visit to London was the Temple Bar Memorial.
This memorial stands in the middle of the road near the Royal Courts of Justice and designates the boundary between the City of Westminster and the City of London. This is the spot where the original gates to the City of London known as the Temple Bar, once stood.
The memorial consists of a tall stone pedestal with intricate carvings and featuring statues of Queen Victoria and her eldest son. Atop the pedestal stands a large winged dragon.
This is certainly an eye-catching memorial and it is certainly worthy of your attention should you be passing by!
Written December 14, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Rubaiyat E S
Faro, Portugal2,165 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2016 • Couples
Temple Bar Memorial now stands on the original site at the junction of the Strand and Fleet Street. This monument comprises sculpture by four Victorian artists. On the top there is a bronze dragon referred to as ‘the griffin’. Griffin is the symbol of the City of London and marks the official entrance to the City of London. On the two sides there are full statues in stone of Queen Victoria and Edward, Prince of Wales, by the sculptor J. E. Boehm. These are the finest and dimensional sculptures.

On state occasions the monarch traditionally has to pause at Temple Bar and ask the Lord Mayor for permission to enter the City.
Written March 7, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Jolyon67
Melbourne, Australia5,714 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2014 • Friends
If you are on the upper deck of a London bus heading along The Strand look out for this monument in the middle of the road. You will have the unique vantage point of being almost eye level with the statues of Queen Victoria or Prince Albert who adorn either side.
The Temple Bar memorial marks the transition from Westminster to the City of London. Traditionally all royal processions would have to stop here and be granted permission by the Lord Mayor to enter the city.
The current monument dates to 1880 when it was erected to replace an arch which was causing traffic congestion. The previous arch was built by Christopher Wren 200 years earlier and can be seen in Paternoster Square close to St Paul's. Victoria and Albert were the last monarchs to pass through the arch, so earned a place on the new monument.
Albert is on the towards St Paul's side and Victoria towards Westminster.
Written February 4, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

TeamWard
Nottingham, UK5,177 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2020
The Temple Bar Memorial is a strange but very splendid piece of sculpture at the junction of Fleet & Strand, basically on one side Queen Victoria with a Dragon on the top, worth locating.
Written September 30, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Alice R
Hobart, Australia8,217 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2020 • Friends
Once one of several historic gates into the city now lies a dragon which appears ready to swoop down. We only saw this in passing.
Written March 19, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Epic-Traveller
Rushden, UK4,477 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2019
The Temple Bar Memorial with its rich, sculptural embellishments is located in the middle of the road, opposite Street's Law Courts, where Fleet Street meets the Strand.

It marks the place where Sir Christopher Wren's Temple Bar used to stand, as the ceremonial entrance to the City of London from Westminster. The bronze free-standing statues of Queen Victoria and the Prince of Wales, facing the road on each side, are by Sir Joseph Boehm. They are celebrated in this area because in 1872 they were the last royals to pass through the old gate, in order to attend a thanksgiving service at St Paul's Cathedral for the Prince's recovery from typhoid. Samuel Kelsey's bronze relief on the north side of the Temple Bar Memorial commemorates this event.

A fascinting monument to where the old entrance to the City of London used to stand. Temple Bar has now been rebuilt near Paternoster Square.
Written September 8, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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