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Postman's Park

322 Reviews

Postman's Park

322 Reviews
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King Edward Street, EC1, London England
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St. Paul'sUnderground3 min
BarbicanUnderground5 min
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Jack the Ripper Tour with 'Ripper-Vision' in London
Historical & Heritage Tours

Jack the Ripper Tour with 'Ripper-Vision' in London

1,260 reviews
Immerse yourself in Victorian London on this one-of-a-kind Jack the Ripper experience featuring RIPPER-VISION.™ Unlike other tours, your guide uses handheld projectors to accompany spine-chilling tales of the murders committed by Jack the Ripper in the 1800s. As you explore the dimly lit back streets of Whitechapel, images of Victorian London are projected onto buildings to guarantee a highly atmospheric experience. Plus, an evening departure time means you’ll experience London at its most mysterious.  
$18.80 per adult
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Brian T wrote a review Nov 13
London, United Kingdom3,085 contributions4,675 helpful votes
+1
I’m a big fan of urban curiosities, and did not know about this tiny park to the north of St Paul’s Cathedral in London until I saw it mentioned on a ‘Curiosities of London’ blog I follow. And if you are interested in unusual things, you’ll probably enjoy a visit here as well. I was totally absorbed by it and spent a good hour here ‘reading all about it!’, and what stories it had to tell! It’s a small park, within the boundaries of the City of London. It opened in 1880 on the sites of some former churchyards and burial grounds. It’s beautifully manicured with colourful garden beds and mature trees, offering shade and seating to visitors. But under a tiled awning (or ‘loggia’) which extends along the wall of one of the buildings adjoining the park, is a curious memorial: the George Frederic Watts's Memorial to Heroic Self-Sacrifice. It’s a memorial to ordinary people who died while saving the lives of others and who might otherwise be forgotten, in the form of ceramic memorial tablets placed along the wall. There were just 4 memorials placed there when it was opened in 1900, and memorials were added sporadically over the next few years. Then after a hiatus of over 70 years, a new memorial (in the same style as the others) was added in 2009. You’ll spot that tile, marking a heroic death which occurred in 2007. The tiles make wonderful reading; it’s poignant, and occasionally amusing when thought of in context of the times. You’ll read about 17 year old Elizabeth Boxall who died in 1888 while trying to save a child from a runaway horse. And Police Constable Robert Wright who, in 1893, entered a burning house to save a damsel in distress knowing that petroleum was stored in the cellar, only to be killed in the subsequent explosion. There’s a plaque to William Goodrum, a railway signalman who lost his life in 1880 while saving a workman from death in the path of an approaching train. See if you can spot the latest memorial of Leigh Pitt who lost his life in a heroic act in 2007. There are dozens of similar memorials with similar acts of heroism noted. Over 50 plaques have been placed, with room for 60 or more in the future. It was a curious find, and I appreciated my visit to Postman’s Park. I’m not sure why it’s called Postman’s Park. It’s a short walk from St Paul’s Cathedral, on King Edward Street. It’s open from 08:00 until dusk. And if you are fan of the comedy sketch show ‘Little Britain’, you may want to pop along to the adjoining street of the same name for a selfie! St Paul’s is the closest Underground station.
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Date of experience: September 2020
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HolidaymakerfromHove wrote a review Oct 2020
Brighton and Hove, United Kingdom629 contributions95 helpful votes
Small park with some covered seating. So called because it’s located near to a post office. Worth a visit if you are in the Barbican area. There are lots of commemorative plaques to otherwise unsung heroes which are very old and very interesting. Recommended.
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Date of experience: October 2020
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futtock21 wrote a review Aug 2020
London, United Kingdom9,844 contributions1,199 helpful votes
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Postman’s Park is a secluded mainly grassy space connecting King Edward Street and St. Martin-Le-Grand just south of Little Britain. It first opened in 1880 upon the burial ground of St. Botolph’s Aldersgate before its expansion twenty years later to incorporate the adjacent burial grounds of Christ Church Greyfriars and St. Leonard’s Foster Lane. That same year was built the awning and the first of two ceramic tiles forming part of George Frederick Watts’s Memorial to Heroic Self-Sacrifice. Today the gardens serve as a location for city workers to eat their sandwiches on sunny lunchtimes.
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Date of experience: August 2020
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Clivey57 wrote a review Mar 2020
London, United Kingdom779 contributions210 helpful votes
Been past a few times as it’s 2 minutes from the museum of London, it’s a small open space in the heart of the city, outside is a blue phone box original now just for show. City workers having there lunch here as you walk through you come to a memorial wall dedicated to people who died saving others each plaque from the late 1880s onwards. There’s one plaque that’s from 2007 which is strange as it’s 80 years later than the others.
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Date of experience: March 2020
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Tony H wrote a review Feb 2020
Buckhurst Hill, United Kingdom229 contributions56 helpful votes
This is a tucked away little green space near St Paul's Cathedral. I always take friends who visiting London here because of the simple charming emotion it evokes. Various ceramic plaques to remember those who lost their lives in an effort to save others, mostly dating from around year 1800. A poinient reminder and to be cherished. Exciting, no. Memorable , certainly yes,
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Date of experience: February 2020
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