Brunei Gallery

Brunei Gallery, London: Hours, Address, Brunei Gallery Reviews: 4/5

Brunei Gallery
4
10:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday
10:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday
10:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday
10:30 AM - 8:00 PM
Friday
10:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday
10:30 AM - 5:00 PM
What people are saying

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The area
Address
Neighborhood: Bloomsbury
Snuggly nestled within Central London is academic and leafy Bloomsbury, an area that boasts walking distance access to many of London's most popular attractions. It is also home to some of Britain's most celebrated museums, including the must-see British Museum. Despite an understandable popularity with students, tourists and day trippers, vast sections of Bloomsbury retain a quiet, residential feel year round and throughout the week.
How to get there
  • Russell Square • 5 min walk
  • Goodge St • 6 min walk

4.0
24 reviews
Excellent
5
Very good
17
Average
1
Poor
1
Terrible
0

Nicholas H
London, UK20,576 contributions
Fascinating Yoga exhibition
Feb 2020 • Solo
This is part of the School of Oriental & African Studies within UCL, so exhibitions will reflect topics relevant to its interests. There tend to be a number of small exhibitions running concurrently. On this visit I loved the ground floor exhibition on the Hatha Yoga Project. Only issue was something beyond the gallery’s control, getting past the picket line for the lecturers’ strike over pensions. This was good natured but irritating. But well worth making the effort.
Written February 23, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Michael
London, UK84 contributions
African Textiles
Oct 2019 • Solo
The Brunei Gallery is part of the School of African and Oriental Studies at the University of London, but don't let that put you off; it just gives you an idea of what to expect. Current show is of textiles - woven stuff mostly - from east and north Africa and if that seems dry, it isn't. This show throbs with quiet vitality. You sense that everything has or had a value quite unlike the self-satisfied pieces of -particularly modern - art that every other gallery seems full of these days. These are things that were used - either every day or for rare ceremonies - and each has a curious quality that will surprise. So, the most plain and regular piece of weaving suddenly reveals a crocodile or a god or man as part of its design. Figures are irregular, upside down, out of scale, but each has a vitality inherent to its use and place as both item of comfort (mostly) or treasure. Africa is a massive continent with more wonders than most Europeans would credit. (There's the same sense of vitality in the British Museum's African gallery). It has been and is a source of inspiration and wonder, both for the unique perspective of its artists and the compelling pressures of necessity that is inherent to African society. But there's richness too. In this show you'll also find gold and gold weights, bronzes, beads, silver and sumptuous jewellery. Not a huge show, it's on till 14 December 2019.
Written October 19, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Kim B
2 contributions
Music from Namibia exhibition
Sep 2019
We enjoyed listening to the music - on vinyl and via headphones. We sawy some of the permanent exhibition - it looks worth going back to. We ran out of time for the roof garden. Next time!
Written September 29, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Ian C
London, UK23,970 contributions
Lift not working - a wasted visit
Aug 2019 • Friends
For an organisation that prides itself on championing all sorts of equality issues, it was disappointing to find that, on the day I visited with friends who had accessibility issues, the lift was not working, so we could only see the Japanese laquer and Phillipine exhibitions on the ground floor and not anything on the others, including the roof garden which was to be a highlight of our visit.

The security guard did not know the lift was not working and, when we told him, was apologetic, but that's not the point.
Written August 18, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Clive W
Orpington1,681 contributions
Interesting Discovery
Aug 2019
Although I consider myself reasonably well informed regarding London and its museums, I only heard of this museum when I picked up a leaflet called “Museum Mile”. The Gallery is part of the School of Oriental and African Studies with exhibits reflecting this.

When I visited, there was a temporary display of exquisite lacquer work by Koyanagi Tanekuni. It was beautiful and the symbolism of each piece was clearly explained. Downstairs was an exhibition about music in Namibia, including photos and headphones to listen to music.

In the permanent gallery was an exhibition of historical artefacts, owned by SOAS, relating to Britain and the Philippines. I knew nothing about this topic so it was interesting. I think these exhibits change.

There is a Japanese garden on the top floor. Unfortunately, this was not at its best as work was being done. It is plain, even austere, with stones, gravel, some greenery and seats. I was intrigued by the wall inlets with long chains reaching to the ground pebbles. I think water is supposed to run down when it rains.

The museum is quite small. I was there about 40 minutes. It is free. I had difficulty finding it and several people I asked didn’t seem to know where it is! It is located at a corner of Russell Square and there is a signpost.
Written August 10, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Taxidevil
Glasgow, UK2,982 contributions
Small free gallery
Jul 2019 • Couples
Nice gallery to visit also has a small Japanese roof garden. It was not busy at all when we visited on a weekday and we had the garden to ourselves. The garden is nicely laid out but not very big.
The exhibition when we visited was "Stolen Moments – Namibian Music History Untold (1950-80s)". We stayed for the talk given by the curators which was very detailed and very interesting.
The gallery is free and open to the public, not far from Russell Square.
Written July 19, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Master Jonjon
London, UK344 contributions
Ainu simply means human.
Nov 2018 • Solo
“Master – an Ainu story” 🏠

➡ One-sentence summary
Anthropological photographer Adam Isfendiyar has lived with the tribe Ainu of Hokkaido for two years and detailed their everyday life and social tensions of being an ‘outsider’.

And being human yet any subtle difference from the ‘mainstream’ everyday pedestrians is all that is needed to start a cycle of alienation and un-empathy.

The Ainu’s have settled in Hokkaido having arrived in Japan as early as since 10000 B.C. Following a language and cultural ban by the Meiji government’s nationalist movement, over the years now it is estimated that only ten people in the world could speak the language. And as a glimpse of light to this perpetual darkness of neglect, as to what’s going to vanish, soon, out in a snowy night from somewhere so far away from our cities’ imagination – Ainu’s aboriginal status has only been recognized as recent as since 2008.

The exhibition blends interviews with photography by presenting monologues alongside relevant images. Here many works focus on one protagonist – with which Isfendiyar has befriended – an old man reminiscing of his inconvenient past, of how biases and bullying prevail in schools and the story of non-assimilation and rejection just because of one’s appearance.

(Isfendiyar’s disclaimer article on the top floor reminds us that there are people from both sides – Ainu and mainstream Japanese alike – that have contributed to the preservation of Ainu culture, that the tragic story of one Ainu protagonist should hardly be viewed as overly generalizable, and that there can be many views to the same phenomenon.)

~master jonjon
Written February 6, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

macedonboy
Glasgow, UK151,202 contributions
Brunei Gallery
Jan 2019 • Solo
A nice free museum that's part of the SOAS University of London. There's an ever changing program of exhibits and on the day I visited it was Film Poster Art in Africa. Nice to see some rather amusing interpretations of the films the posters were meant to advertise. Especially for films I've seen before. Really interesting the artists try to make their art stand out from the crowd with extra colourful arrangement, not to mention gore.
Written January 26, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Schadla-Hall T
London, UK177 contributions
The Catalhoyuk exhibition -.. the curious case of!
Oct 2018 • Solo
The Brunei gallery always has challenging and exciting exhibitions- one of the best venues in London - always punching above its weight! Always worth a visit to see what is on, but this exhibition is both fascinating - for archaeologists! and for anyone interested in this famous site - so visit it!
Written October 14, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

kcdenman
Fair Oaks, CA834 contributions
Sikh exhibit AND Indian postcards
Sep 2018 • Solo
You can't really tell from the front what you're in for, and when they say open at 1030, they mean on the dot. At first I thought, oh this is a lovely room with a cannon, but I realized the exhibit was also the ENTIRE downstairs as well. Clothing, maps, jewelry, paintings, just all types of fascinating objects and great signage.

Upstairs (and yes there is an elevator so you can get to part of the exhibit) is a display of personal postcards from European who stayed in India and sent home personal notes. Some are racist, and this is addressed well, but if you are not very mobile, you will miss the exhibit in the staircase itself. It is worth taking the elevator to the top to see the majority of the signage though.
Written September 14, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

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Frequently Asked Questions about Brunei Gallery

Brunei Gallery is open:
  • Tue - Wed 10:30 AM - 5:00 PM
  • Thu - Thu 10:30 AM - 8:00 PM
  • Fri - Sat 10:30 AM - 5:00 PM