Soup Kitchen for the Jewish Poor

Soup Kitchen for the Jewish Poor

Soup Kitchen for the Jewish Poor
3
Historic SitesPoints of Interest & Landmarks
About
All that remains of this Jewish landmark is its name carved prominently on the front of the building, which now houses upscale apartments and condos.
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The area
Address
Neighborhood: Whitechapel
Whether you're here for its dynamic street life, world class galleries or famed curry houses, you're bound to be wowed by the uniquely cosmopolitan flavor of Whitechapel. Long gone are the days when Jack the Ripper stalked its streets. And despite his mysterious legacy bringing throngs of curiosity driven tour groups to its back alleys and otherwise serene garden squares, these days you're more likely to catch a cutting edge fashionista scurrying through its age old lanes than criminals of any sort.
How to get there
  • Aldgate East • 5 min walk
  • Aldgate • 6 min walk
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Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

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3.0
5 reviews
Excellent
1
Very good
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Terrible
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MikeWells90
Brighton and Hove, UK2,089 contributions
Mar 2017 • Solo
It is almost half a century since I first got to know the Spitalfields
area of East London. In those days Spitalfields was still a largely
Jewish area. Although by then the Jewish poulation was mostly
elderly and was in decline, as younger Jewish people moved to
the suburbs. The building, which once housed the Soup Kitchen
for the Jewish Poor, is an interesting survivor of the area's
Jewish heritage.
The soup kitchen was originally situated in nearby Fashion
Street. It moved to17-19 Butler Street and opened in December
1902. The street name changed to Brune Street in 1937.
The soup kitchen closed in 1992 and the building has since
been converted to residential use, but with many of the original
features retained. The building is not open to the public, but its
most interesting features can be seen from the street.
The building was designed by Lewis Solomon. It was built with
brick, buff terracotta dressings and slate roof. The original
wooden shopfronts and doors largely survive. Any visit to the
area in search of signs of the former Jewish community, such as
this building, should also include the nearby Sandys Row
Synagogue, which is still open and active.
Written March 28, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

TAMAN1951
Liberty Lake, WA6,617 contributions
Jan 2024 • Couples
Sadly, not much remains of the old soup kitchen that was used to feed the poor Jewish refugees.

It was indeed a significant humanitarian effort in a dire time of need.
Written January 7, 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

sheepygold
london5,583 contributions
Apr 2017 • Solo
A historic building that gives a glimpse into the Jewish way of life around here a century ago. The area is also interesting for buildings cafes and shops. Just off the beaten track. If you like this place maybe find Sandy's Row synagogue.
Written April 7, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

macedonboy
Glasgow, UK179,624 contributions
May 2018 • Solo
This building is actually next to my offices else I would've noticed it. In fact, it's proximity is probably the only reason to visit. Formerly a charity to help the poor and destitute, it's now private residences. There's no evidence of its former function except the words "Soup kitchen for the Jewish Poor" chiseled into the stone. Only visit if you have an insatiable appetite for Jewish history in the east end of London
Written May 23, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

JordanS8
Sarasota, FL1,548 contributions
Jun 2018 • Couples
Such a worthy reminder of a noble deed of the English, taking in displaced refugees from The Russian pograms. They came dirt poor with just the clothes on their back and were fed here until they got on their feet. Only the building facade remains as a reminder.
Written June 8, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
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