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Massasauga Provincial Park

48 Reviews
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Massasauga Provincial Park

48 Reviews
Sorry, there are no tours or activities available to book online for the date(s) you selected. Please choose a different date.
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380 Oastler Park Dr, Parry Sound, Ontario P2A 2W8 Canada
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Self-Guided Audio Driving Tour between Barrie & Muskoka
Cultural Tours

Self-Guided Audio Driving Tour between Barrie & Muskoka

Listen to a tour guide as you drive with the Tripvia Tours app! <br><br>50 points of interest including lakes, tourist attractions, sights, cities &amp; towns. Learn about the animals, geography, historical events &amp; people unique to the area! <br><br>Routes (400 &amp; 11)<br>Tour is based on the most travelled route between popular destinations Barrie, Muskoka, Parry Sound, Huntsville &amp; Bracebridge.<br><br>Freedom<br>No directions or time limits. Stop at as many sights &amp; attractions as you like. Start / stop anywhere. Travel in any direction along route.<br><br>Hands Free <br>Fun audio clips play automatically as you drive. Live GPS map. No data used during tour. <br><br>Easy to Use<br>Download the app. Select the tour. Go!<br><br>Family Friendly<br>Fun Tripvia Guides keep you laughing &amp; engaged along the way! <br><br>Trivia Fun <br>Each point of interest has a fun multiple choice trivia question. Keep score or just listen!<br><br>Inexpensive <br>Only 1 tour booking needed per vehicle. Play audio through vehicle's stereo so everyone can hear.
$6.23 per adult
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herman k wrote a review Jul 2020
Caledon, Canada20 contributions8 helpful votes
Sliding downhill, fast. The Massasauga used to be an amazing experience. But over the past 5 years it has been sliding. Last visit there was a potful of kraft dinner dumped in the site. This time there is a broken booze bottle in the water and no-one will come out to see where it is so that it can be cleaned up. Some kid or adult is going to get their foot ripped up. There is also soiled toilet paper im two locations at our site, probably because the staffer who checked the visitors im dis not explain that there is a “thunder box”. No-one gives a damn and in my opinion it is 100% a management issue, ny not training and by not setting standards for these summer workers. Last visitors here dug a fresh fire pit between 2 pines and burned through the roots of both of them. Disgusting. Find a different park.
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Date of experience: July 2020
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Canadian_Guy1000 wrote a review Jul 2019
Toronto, Canada2,343 contributions669 helpful votes
Upon entering the park, I saw a very welcome addition—a new, big parking lot! Later I spoke to a park employee and was told that from now on it would be possible to park more than one car per campsite, which is awesome. By the way, park staff were very nice and helpful. Because of very high water level, some campsites have apparently been flooded and become unusable. Even though I knew my campsite on Blackstone Harbour would be fine (I had camped on it several times, most recently in 2016, 3 years ago), a large patch of its rocky shore was submerged. There were 2 beaver lodges nearby—three years ago they were adjacent to the land—now they resembled small ‘islands’, some 3 meters from the shore. And many trees, which have been under the water for several years, have finally died. It was the second part of June and I did not expect to see black flies anymore. Unfortunately, I was wrong: due to the rainy weather, they were still active and in spite of using Deet-based insect repellents, I got 20 nasty bites during my entire 12 day stay. Surprisingly, mosquitoes were not that bad—perhaps the wind blew them away. But when I went into the forest, they were swarms of them all over me. Motorboats are an integral part of the park and their noise did not bother me that much. Yet I found jet skis (a.k.a. sea doos) very annoying. In my opinion, they should be banned from certain lakes in provincial parks. We also heard float planes taking off from Woods Bay, very noisy—and one aircraft even landed on Blackstone Harbour and then took off, generating plenty of deafening noise. Having the food storage bin on our campsite was terrific, we did not have to worry about hanging food every day. I wish more parks considered installing such containers, they are extremely convenient. The weather was very good—it rained once or twice, but otherwise it was not very hot and we enjoyed paddling or just sitting on the campsite and watching the scenery around us. Several times we canoed to Pete’s Place and then drove to Parry Sound or MacTier to replenish our provisions. Once we saw a turtle laying eggs in the parking lot near the ramp. The park staff placed pylons and posted notices so that tourists would not drive over those locations. Fishing on Blackstone Harbour was very poor. For several days I watched a bass just off our campsite and it took me a lot of time and effort to finally catch it—it was delicious! Our second—and the only other fish we caught—was a small pike. I often observed fishermen in motorboats fishing near our campsite, but never saw them catch anything. We spent several hours on Woods Bay, but did not have any luck either. At least we did not have to worry about breaking any fishing regulations and exceeding the catch/possession limit… During my previous visits to this park, in 2016, we saw several black bears at our campsites. This time the only black bear we spotted was crossing Healy Road—it was quite small, timid and quickly disappeared in the forest—it moved so clumsily and awkwardly that we burst out laughing! But we were lucky to see plenty of other animals on or around our campsite. Water snakes of various sizes were plentiful, either swimming in the water (one even approached me while I was bathing) or sunning on the rocks. There were two garter snakes on our campsite—one apparently lived in a tree hollow next to the food storage bin. Chipmunks and squirrels were sporadic and always avoided us. My outdoor hunting camera, which I set up near the beaver lodge, recorded a raccoon, but I do not think it ever visited our campsite, we would have certainly noticed such activity. Every evening we saw a beaver or two, swimming nearby—as well as an otter or muskrat. Grey tree frogs commenced their concerto each evening—the sound they generated was earsplitting! It took me a while before I finally spotted one—it was sitting just a meter from our campfire (on the ground) and I gently relocated it farther from the campsite—yet each night I found it at the same location! I saw a lizard, most likely the five-lined skink. Several snapping turtles were swimming just near the shore. Every evening we were serenated by loons—one apparently had his habitat next to our campsite and we saw it all the time. Another distinctive sound came from barred owls. Sometimes they were just meters from us, up in the trees—but it was impossible to see them and hear them as they relocated—yes, they can fly noiselessly! Crows would often wake us up, much too early to our liking, though! Twice was saw hummingbirds, but since there were not any flowers, they quickly flew off. The first few day seagulls paid us friendly visits, hoping for a snack, but once they realized that they were not going to get any, they ignored our campsite. Once I was standing next to the tree on the campsite when I heard tapping. I thought my friend was making this sound, yet he was not around. Just seconds later I heard the same sound again—and at the same time pieces of bark and wood chips were falling off the tree all over me. I looked up—and just a meter or so from me was a beautiful pileated woodpecker, aggressively pecking at the tree! I saw it again a few days later, pecking at the same tree. We also saw its smaller cousin, perhaps a red headed woodpecker. But the most majestic sight was watching blue herons take off and fly gracefully just above the water surface and land on the shore. Twice a family of geese, including several goslings, came over to our campsite, walked around the tents and proceeded to the water—as well as a flock of ducks & ducklings often swam in front of the campsite. And one day, as I was reading a book, I suddenly realized that a magnificent deer was just standing meters away and intensely staring at me—and then gracefully ran into the forest! I should also mention insects. At night there were swarms of mayflies which were probably reaching the end of their short lifespan—the area around the campfire was covered with them and resembled a living carpet. Dragonflies were plentiful and often hoovered all over us, hunting for mosquitos. We saw several dragonfly nymphs, they were sluggishly moving on the rocks or trees—and in the morning there were only empty shells (called an exuvia), from which the adult dragonfly must have just emerged. Nightly several cockchafers (May bugs) flew around us, attracted by our headlights. And there were plenty of ants everywhere—some were quite big, others smaller and living on the tree—as well as many ant queens. Hopefully next time I will camp on in a more remote location of the park, but camping on Blackstone Harbour can be very enjoyable, too!
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Date of experience: June 2019
3 Helpful votes
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Pike53 wrote a review Jul 2019
Mississauga, Canada67 contributions45 helpful votes
Our site offered very scenic views and in general it was quiet—however, from time to time we were disturbed by noisy boats and especially very raucous jet skis, which is one of the very few drawbacks, especially if you’re camping on Blackstone Harbour near the channel. The weather was excellent, yet there were still active black flies and mosquitoes. Blackstone Harbour wasn’t a good place to fish—we saw plenty of fishing boats around our campsite, fishermen were trolling or casting—and hardly ever catching anything big enough to keep. Rocks, and especially wet moss, can be very slippery—even if you’ve got good boots/shoes, you may still fall. The campsite was clean, picturesque and very spacious. I was very glad that there was a food storage bin on the campsite. Be careful when you close it, you might hurt your fingers as the lid is very heavy. Overall it’s a great park.
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Date of experience: June 2019
1 Helpful vote
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gtafarmfreshsod wrote a review Nov 2018
Mexico City, Mexico17 contributions4 helpful votes
Have discovered this gem of a location many years ago. Now it is a provincial park and the boat canoe ramps and parking is great. The many private campsites have picnic tables fire pits great tent areas .and shiters are located all by the water and have a different ambiance in each one . Many years needed to learn rocks and shoals recommended you ,take it slow and enjoy the scenery. 5 star fishing if you can find them lots of water. Enjoy
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Date of experience: September 2018
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Gordon W wrote a review Oct 2018
Guelph14 contributions2 helpful votes
Well worth the trip. Mississauga is situated close to the city but it is still in a wilderness. The site allow both the novice and the experienced canoeist venues to explore. We took our grand kids on their first trio and the proximity of the site allowed us to minimize time in the canoe and maximize the wilderness experience. A great park to introduce someone to wilderness canoe experience.
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Date of experience: July 2018
2 Helpful votes
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