Hardangervidda National Park

Hardangervidda National Park

Hardangervidda National Park
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Points of Interest & Landmarks • Scenic Walking Areas
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Hardangervidda is the largest mountain plateau in Europe. This is where you will find Norway's largest national park. The scenery is varied with steep mountainsides and spectacular views. The countryside there is diverse, ranging from flat plains on the eastern side to steep mountains and fjords in the west. It is home to Europe's lagerst herd of wild reindeer and several other artctic plants and animals. There are many opportunities for fishing, and mountain trout from Hardangercidda are famous for their excellent quality.
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5.0
112 reviews
Excellent
95
Very good
16
Average
1
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0
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0

Camilla K
1 contribution
Jul 2021 • Family
Fantastic experience! Nice museum, interesting exhibition. Best part for us was the insect course, our 4 children aged 4-14 loved it! Lovely, patient and knowledgable staff. Thank you.
Written July 15, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Reena MD
New Westminster, Canada14 contributions
Aug 2016 • Family
We did a 8-day guided tour with DNT through the Hardangervidda, going from hut to hut from the north to the south of the park at the western edge. Some notes:

- DNT is a norwegian trekking organization that offers guided hikes. Their guides are local volunteers, so do not expect the same level of service (ie. english competency, explanation of history/flora/fauna/geology/etc, cooking skills, attention to pace and/or health) as you would get from a professional. That said, if you've never done any hiking in Norway before, it's a good way to get started, and you can learn about the great hut system!
- DNT does not offer luggage storage. You will have to find a solution for this yourself (and it's not that easy, especially if your hike is longer than 1 week).
- the Vidda is not for beginners. Good weather is an exception here. Expect horizontal rain and a headwind, and poor visibility. We had this, plus snow one day, and then beautiful sun as well. All in early August. You will get wet. Especially your feet.
- The terrain is not particularly hilly, but it is very, very uneven and rocky, and after a few days, 8 hours per day, your feet will start to notice it. The best type of boots are actually those old fashioned, heavy kind with very stiff soles. Modern "hiking shoes" will make your feet sore in the long run. Waterproof your boots and bring extra wax. Wear gaiters. And poles are very helpful for the many stream crossings and for stability, especially when wearing a pack.
- the times indicated on the official trekking maps are walking times - they do not include time for breaks at all. And they are measured at what we came to call a "norwegian pace". This is brisk, about 2 steps per second. It is not easy to keep this up for several days at a stretch. If you are starting out, pick huts that are closer together (less than 6 hours) as you could well be spending 50% more time than indicated, especially if you want to do some photography! And yes, bring a map. You don't want to get lost.
- the fully staffed and partially staffed huts we stayed at all had drying rooms for wet gear so you don't have to put on wet stuff in the mornings.
- bring a thermos, the huts we stayed at would fill them as part of the lunch package. It's nice to have a warm drink for lunch!
- I was told that the huts in the park itself never turn away anyone, but do not count on those on the perimeter being so accomodating. We ended up having to bail from the tour for health reasons. On our way out, we had hoped to stay at Dyranut, but upon arrival all huts were full and we were turned away. Luckily we were able to hitchhike out to somewhere we could stay.
- public transportation in and out of the area is spotty, so get fully informed before you go. We discovered timetables changed in early August. Going with an organized group means your travels are arranged.
- Many locals hike with their young children, so it's possible for kids to do this.
- The area is a lot like the Canadian arctic, but with less wildlife (more human activity). The scenery is desolate. You'll understand Norwegians better once you've seen the place ;).
Written August 15, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

David P
Brno, Czech Republic372 contributions
Aug 2016 • Friends
We made 100 kilometres hike that took us 5 days. We set out from Kinsarvik and after five days we got to Tyssedal at 38 km long Sørfjord. We went across the following huts: Stavali, Torehytten, Litlos and Tyssevassbu. Once you get to the plateau, the altitude difference between individual stages is not very high but the weather can make the hike very demanding. You have to be prepared for frequent rains, many fords, wet ground and temperatures between 0 and 10 degrees of Celsius even in late August. You can decide whether to sleep in huts or at any place on the way in zour own tent. There is plenty of drinking water in streams and lakes along the way so there is no need to carry large reserve of water. Orientation is quite difficult when the weather is foggy. I would reccomend to wait until the visibility is at least 50 metres.
Written September 4, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Sue M
Williamsburg, VA1,464 contributions
May 2018 • Couples
After getting off the Bergen Railway in Geilo, our bus driver picked us up to take us across the Hardangervidda Mountain Plateau. There is only one road going across this desolate, above the tree line tundra. This is not the place to have your car break down. In fact, the bus driver had to make this trip twice, once he dropped us off in Voss, he drove across the plateau to pick us up at Geilo, and then returning across the plateau w/ his busload of tourists. Such interesting terrain, still completely snow-covered land & lakes in mid-May - our tour guide said in another month, the snow will be melted and gone. There a glacier up here but I couldn't identify it. The terrain reminded me much of northern Scotland near Aberdeen, mostly brush, heather, basically barren. It was quite desolate, we did see some traffic on the road but no McDonald's, definitely no gas stations. I wouldn't want to try to drive across this in the dark. Nevertheless, the scenery was amazing - something that I haven't had much experience with. If you found this review helpful, please click on the button below.
Written June 1, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

R R
London, UK21 contributions
Aug 2016 • Family
The Queen's Trail is along the outskirts of the Hardangervidda mountain plateau, between Kinsarvik and Lofthus. This was a very demanding hike especially since it was constantly raining which also made it dangerous. We only got to see the fjords below a few times because of the fog blocking everything. We started getting lost half way and were walking back until we saw a group of locals who helped us find the way all the way to the Monk Steps. It was very slippery and a few people fell on the way down so be very careful of the mud. This hike was more dangerous than the Vidden trail in Bergen so be prepared with hiking shoes with good grips. It took us 8 hours to complete.
Written September 1, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Carole P
Newton Abbot152 contributions
Sep 2014 • Friends
We visited Hardangervidda on a 3 hour coach excursion from our cruise ship which was berthed in Eidfjord, a delightful village at the head of a fjord and in the heart of the mountains. We are so pleased to have seen the dramatic scenery on the tour, as it included the River Eio, the towering mountain walls of the Mabodal Valley and the Hardangervidda mountain plateau 2,460 feet above sea level. The tour included a stop at the Sysen Dam, one of Norway's largest, where we walked along the 262 feet high walls for wonderful views. The last stop was at the impressive Voringfoss Waterfall. Anyone with reasonable mobility can enjoy this tour and really get to see some of the most dramatic sights in the area.
Written September 13, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Svein-Magne_Tunli
Bergen, Norway2,444 contributions
Dec 2012 • Solo
Hardangervidda is Norway's biggest national park and the largest highland plateau in Northern Europe. Half of the plateau is a national park, to protect Europe's largest wild reindeer herds.

Hardangervidda is perfect for hiking during summer and cross country skiing at winter times. There are plenty of opportunities along the National Park Route to get out of your car and experience some of the finest scenery that Norway has to offer. Whether you prefer exploring the mountains, the forest or the sea, you won’t need to go far to find it.

The weather in Hardangervidda National Park can change very rapidly from sunny and warm to cold and rainy or even snowy (even in summertime), so it's important to bring along extra layers of clothing, like wool underwear and wind- and waterproof outerwear. For most people, late spring, summer and fall are the best times of year to visit Hardangervidda.

Regards
Svein-Magne Tunli from Bergen, Norway
tunliweb.no
Written December 18, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

dtnb2008
Gothenburg, Sweden61 contributions
Aug 2017
We drove through with road 7, and the view was spectacular. Especially at Park Skaupsjøen just at the tail of Hardangervidda. There we camped out for the night, it was cold but the view was worth it. We visited in summer but snow was still scattered around.
Written August 11, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Curious724849
14 contributions
Aug 2017 • Family
No words can describe the feelings when you see it... You need to see it, you should want to see it ;-)
Written August 4, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

bfbfbfbfbf
Singapore, Singapore264 contributions
May 2015 • Family
I went there in May and the whole place was still covered in snow. The drive along Hardangervidda is on top of the mountain ridge with amazing views. The roads were cleared of snow and the snow pile by the side are at least a metre high. The temperature was -7 degree c (15 degrees lower than it was at sea-level) when I went in May and was even snowing. There were people doing parachute ski-gliding and you could spot wild rabbits hopping around. A must-visit if you are in Hardanger
Written May 9, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Hardangervidda National Park - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (with Photos)

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