Tsunami Photo Museum
Tsunami Photo Museum
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5.0
218 reviews
Excellent
176
Very good
38
Average
4
Poor
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Ando
Shenyang, China28 contributions
Jan 2020 • Couples
I remember when I saw the first horrific footage in the news on tv 2004. I just saw that there are people who wants to share their scenes and life after. Sawing all this pictures and explanation, I was somehow speechless. So it is worth to visit it, even when it is very sad. The pictures are telling you more than I could write here.

I have only made some pictures from the trees around the scene, which have been damaged but not disrooted from the impact.
The Buddha is also on the way to the museum.
Written January 31, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Alana
13 contributions
Feb 2024 • Couples
What a heart wrenching experience learning firsthand about the tsunami from a survivor. I was so moved by her raw emotion and passion to share and make something good for a horrific experience. Very important to visit. Highly recommend.
Written February 11, 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Gabi P
Sydney, Australia138 contributions
Jan 2020
This is a small museum but it has great information. It is a sad experience visiting and there are some horrific photos, but they are covered with a curtain so looking at those is optional. There is a room that describes what tsunamis are and gives a brief history. It's incredible when you look at the comparison of how many people died altogether. Very very sad. It's nice that you can make donations to children who lost their families and other sufferers of the tsunami. Worth a visit.
Written February 8, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Peter O'Sullivan
Hampshire, UK16 contributions
Jan 2013 • Family
We visited the Tsunami museum at Parelyia, Telwatta almost by chance. It is half way (more or less) between Bentota and Galle in Sri Lanka. on the coast road (not the new Express Highway). Our guide offered us a dozen places (turtle farm, mask factories, gem 'superstores', etc.) that we should visit between Bentota and Galle.
We told him that we wanted to go (en route) only to the Tsunami photo museum and to the Maritime Archaeology Museum in Galle and the Rampart restaurant in Galle port
We recommend everybody to Google, check TripAdvisor (etc.) and make their decisions… and tell their guides where they want to go
Anyway we arrived at this rather inconspicuous bungalow on the side of the road, called ‘Tsunami Photo’
We went in, we looked, we were totally taken aback, we cried for an hour and we left… not knowing what we had just experienced
It is very difficult to describe our experience. We simply encourage anybody visiting Sri Lanka to visit this very simple ‘reality’ museum’ – photos.
Newspaper cuttings, children's drawings, please for help … capturing what happened when on Boxing Day in 2004. 40,000 people died in Sri Lanka, and a total of a quarter of million in all the countries of the Indian Ocean.
One of the most poignant anecdotes captured by the photographs is that of the train that was running on the line about 300 metres from the Ocean. After the first wave (there were two) the train stopped at Parelyia, Telwatta. Local people ran from the beach and boarded the train seeking safety. The second wave (at a height of the palm trees and telephone lines) crushed the train and killed almost 2000 people. The guard’s story (he helped people onto the train and he survived) is told in the museum.
When we left t the museum our guide offered us a tissue; he knew we were struggling to come to terms with our experience.
We are grateful to Kamani de Silva who looks after this museum and Jacky van Oostveen in the Netherlands (00310630266520 / info@kunstkoffer.nl) for their work in keeping the story of the 2004 Tsunami alive
Written January 23, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

shazrnz
Christchurch, New Zealand60 contributions
Jul 2018
We arrived in a tuk tuk from the River House. A pleasant drive along the area which was hit. Arrived at the Museum which was created by the lady that lived their and a foreigners help. Amazing detail and pictures. All so very raw and incredibly sad. Heartbreaking stories from children as well as adults. The lady was so informative, and was a true delight to talk to. A donation box for the Cancer Society was a very special touch. So much loss and she is still thinking of others. Well worth a visit.
Written August 23, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

EleHunter
Surrey, UK52 contributions
Mar 2011
This small museum off the main road on the main Galle to Bentota Road and not far from the Tsunami memorial is a must visit. It is only small and the pictures are ragged, but who stops to take pictures with tsunami coming at you? Mrs Di Silva hersef a victim uses her old house for the museum. She survived by running 2 kms inland. Nearby is the site where a train with 1000 people on board were swept away, the engine ended up 5kms inland. Make sure you go to the room at the back which has pictures drawn by the children as their pictorial record of a day which changed their lives.
Written March 6, 2011
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Sriyakka
Sheffield, UK10 contributions
Jun 2018 • Friends
The Tsunami Photo Museum has been built with lot of love and passion. The photos, the collection of things and the stories touch the heart deeply. I remember watching the news when I was only 18. I remember my parents trying to reach family in Sri-Lanka to see if everyone was okay. We were one of the lucky families, with no victims, however we knew many that has suffered great losses. This museum is a reminder of the power of nature and how people can come together to overcome the pain and destructive. I recommended everyone visiting Sri-Lanka to visit. The museum also helps collect monies to help people who are in desperate need of medication, so please when you go spare some Rupees to help.
Written August 9, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

truvoice
Kuala Lumpur39 contributions
Jun 2012 • Family
Certainly this Photo Museum is worth visiting than all those places waiting to punch holes in our pocket. No entrance fee. But I think whoever visits certainly will DONATE. A great place to reminisce 2004 Tsunami. Thanks to the volunteers and people who have set up this Photo Museum. Great effort and hope through this review visitors would spare some time at this museum.
Written July 3, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

dianedinky
Dunfermline, UK791 contributions
Jan 2020
A small museum - well actually two places right next to each other - but which absolutely packs a punch. Done by survivors, it is a very personal space and the photos so not soft soap anything. Some are very hard hitting, but this is how it was. It is hard for an outside to get a true sense of what it was like but this museum does a good job of relaying the fear and utter devastation. A harrowing place but where the people are still so full of hope. A must visit in my opinion.
Written February 14, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Jessy C
Zurich, Switzerland15 contributions
Nov 2019 • Couples
A very sad but impressive experience and a must see having been to Sri Lanka.
Lal was very kind and brought us the horrific happenings of 2004 tsunami at heart. His hospitality was incredibly friendly and personal, he even accompanied us to the moonstone museum, so we could not get lost :)
Written November 5, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Tsunami Photo Museum - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (with Photos)