Pamatnik Vojna

Pamatnik Vojna, Lesetice

Pamatnik Vojna
4.5
Historic Sites • History Museums

4.5
26 reviews
Excellent
17
Very good
7
Average
2
Poor
0
Terrible
0

Sherine
Prague, Czech Republic2 contributions
A must see
Dec 2018 • Couples
This is a very hidden reminder of the communist era and communist prison camps for political prisoners in Czechoslovakia. Sad but informative.
Written December 21, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Jiri_F_S
Czech Republic169 contributions
Sad place of Czech history
Oct 2016 • Business
Everybody should visit this place in order not to forget dark side of our recent history. The visit takes around 60 minutes and in a bad weather take warm clothes. This Memorial you can find by the road sighs.
Written October 17, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

stonestacker52
Flint Hills, Kansas303 contributions
Sobering exposure to a communist era gulag
Sep 2016 • Friends
There are several good reviews explaining the use of this work camp and detention center for dissidents during the communist era.

It is well worth the time to visit this place and realize why the Czech people are so relieved to be out from under the communist rule.

It is very emotional to see the conditions many innocent people were subjected to.
Written October 1, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

DeanMurphy2020
Orlando, FL7,273 contributions
Forced labor, POW camp
May 2016 • Friends
Uranium was discovered at this area of what was then Czechoslovakia, now the Czech Republic. Under Nazi control it was a prisoner-of-war camp, and under communist Russian control after 1948, a forced labor camp—all under the auspices to mine uranium. Czech laborers had no protective garb and most died of exposure to uranium or breathing the gas byproducts. Many of the “workers” were political dissidents, forced to work here because of political or social beliefs.

The monument depicts one person climbing a ladder, presumably to freedom, while other figures are part cement/part metal “skeleton”. This is a sad reminder of what happened not too many years ago. I was nine years old, when the camp was closed, in 1961. And that was not because the communists realized the horrors of forced labor, but because uranium had been depleted. This is not an uplifting memorial, but should be experienced to remind younger generations that political oppression devastates not only economies but lives and societies.
Written June 29, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Jenny R
Prague, Czech Republic32 contributions
Authentically Preserved Communist Labour Camp
Jun 2016 • Couples
The Vojna Memorial is a unique, preserved gulag in the midst of a forest and former uranium mines, southeast of Pribram (a short drive from Pilsen). Although the tours seem to be only in Czech, English speakers can wander through the area and many of the displays and buildings have good translations. Visitors can get a real sense of what it must have been like for the anti-communist political prisoners who were detained there and forced to work in uranium mines. It was the largest forced labour camp in Czechoslovakia, with almost 2,000 prisoners at its peak.
Written June 27, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Jennifer S
Olathe, KS435 contributions
Grim Reminder of Dark History
Jul 2015 • Friends
This is a grim reminder of post World War II Czechoslovakia. Originally a forced labor camp for German prisoners after the war it later became a camp for Czech dissenters of the communist regime. Prisoners were forced to worked in the nearby uranium mines, usually succumbing to the effects of the radiation. Extremely interesting and a must see for all. It provided great history and insight into the communist era .
Written March 26, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

zippy608
Wakefield, MA2,089 contributions
Preserved History
Aug 2015 • Couples
This is a well preserved forced labor camp from communist Czechoslovakia. In 2005 the memorial was dedicated to the victims of communism. It is on the site of a German prisoner-of-war camp from 1947 which then became a forced labor camp between the years 1949-1951 and a prison for political prisoners of the communist regime in 1951-1961. The prisoners were forced to work in the nearby uranium mines.
Another reviewer feels that the Vojna Memorial is not for foreigners, but I would have to disagree. As a person who grew up hearing stories of what went on in communist countries I found it to be very quite interesting and informative. People should visit Vojna to see the suffering that people went through during the communist era.
We were told that we had to take a tour. We had a guide who spoke both Czech and English. She had a little trouble with the English at times, but we still were able to understand what she was trying to get across to us. It is only about an hour from Prague.
Written September 1, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

sgitlin
Huntington Beach, CA536 contributions
A Dark Period in Czechoslovakia History
Apr 2015 • Family
The Vojna Prison camp was one of the largest of the forced labor camps in post WWII Czechoslovakia. The newly entrenched communist government began the work of imprisoning thousands of Czech citizens on the grounds of treason against the state. Anyone deemed a threat to the new order was sentenced to years of forced labor in the uranium mines of Vojna, just south of Prague. Except for the gas chambers, these camps were eerily similar to the German concentration camps.
Written May 3, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

pbuntarl
Phoenix, AZ737 contributions
Everyone Should See!
Jun 2014 • Couples
Located in the middle of a forest, Vojna was originally built by German POW's after World War II as a labor camp to work the nearby uranium mines. With the communist takeover in 1948, Vojna transitioned into a notorious forced labor camp for political prisoners, somewhat resembling a concentration camp with horrible conditions. This is a powerful reminder of the huge number of Czech victims of the communist regime. There are tours thru Vojna.
Written June 27, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

mabinogi
Prague38 contributions
Interesting, but mostly for locals, not for foreigners
Mar 2012 • Solo
Interesting place, but primarily for students of czech history. It used to be a labour camp for prisoners of conscience in 1950s. Its newly renovated. I am not sure, if they have english tour guide, I guess they do not (only my opinion). It takes 30-60 minutes to see the whole camp.
Written April 25, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.
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