Sacred Cenote
Sacred Cenote
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Historic Sites • Geologic Formations
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This natural well, spanning 60 meters in diameter and reaching a depth of 22 meters, was used by the Mayans as a sacrificial pit for virgins, warriors and even infants.
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Detailed Reviews: Reviews order informed by descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as cleanliness, atmosphere, general tips and location information.
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4.0
1,060 reviews
Excellent
397
Very good
307
Average
257
Poor
76
Terrible
23

L B
Taylor, MI353 contributions
It was beautiful to see. The day we were on our tour it began to rain so we could not swim in the cenote. We tried to wait it out but the rain was coming down hard and didn't seem like it was going to stop. So we took tons of pictures of the beautiful place.
Written October 31, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

bucketlisttravellers
Sydney, Australia3,783 contributions
Couples
The Sacred Cenote is at the far end of the Chichen-Itza complex. To get here you must walk past a row of vendors doing their best to sell their wares.
While the cenote has a great deal of significance to the Chichen-Itza site, we found it unimpressive. You can't get too close to it and it looks quite grimmy. We overheard a guide say that the water must be still running albeit slowly as the water doesn't have a stagnant smell.
We noticed a few tourists smoking here, which we found quite disrespectful as the entire Chichen-Itza is no smoking.
Written February 16, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

B1714D
Belgrade, Serbia14,631 contributions
Cenotes are among the biggest attractions on Yucatan, as there're over 6.000 of them. In most of them you can swim, which is an unforgettable experience.
This one in Chichen Itza differs from all others. You cannot dip there, and it had a special meaning for Maya.
Cenote Sagrado is the one where they threw gold, jade and human offerings to Rain God Chaac. It's considered the most sacred one.
It's on the northern side of the complex, easy walkable from the Castillo after a row of vendors.
Do not expect something outstanding apart the hole filled with murky water, but rather use your imagination when there.
Written February 9, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Josh
California82 contributions
Couples
Can't get a real good look down, but the fact there is so much in the cenonte make it amazing to see. All the offerings were thrown into this place, from gold to human sacrifices.
Written July 10, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

ChutTheGuy
Darien, IL129 contributions
Couples
I think some people writing these reviews are confusing the Sacred Cenote and Ik Kil Cenote, which is not part of the Chichen Itza ruins. You CANNOT go up to the water or swimming in this cenote; there is no way in or out. In fact, the Mayans used to throw people in because then they couldn't get out. I also noticed most of the pictures associated with this cenote are actually of the Ik Kil Cenote where you can go swimming. Please do not confuse the two; don't bring your beach towels to this exhibit.
Written January 29, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Phonse F
St. John's, Canada2 contributions
Friends
My brother-in-law and I swam in the sinkhole after a long hot trek through the ruins and it felt very refreshing at the time. However, towards the end of the swim my brother-in-law pointed out that there are hundreds of tiny birds nesting in little round holes that have been pecked out of the soft limestone walls. Generations of these birds have likely been resident in the walls for thousands of years, with thousands of years of bird droppings being dissolved in the water. I left the 'pool' shortly after considering the implications of the resident bird population and became even more concerned when, I felt a sore throat coming on within an hour of leaving the water. Gargled with salt water, and drank a couple of straight whiskeys to attack the bacteria which seemed to do the job for me, but my brother in law was stomach sick for several days after our swim. My question: Considering the presence of these birds and perhaps other wildlife whose waste is inexorably building up in this pool, as well as the hundreds of swimmers who urinate in it every day, is this water being treated to kill bacteria? Is it tested at all? I would not risk swimming there again until I had satisfactory answers to these questions.
Written June 18, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Kristen Y
Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States2 contributions
Friends
I believe about 90% of people who reviewed this cenote confused it with the Cenote Ik Kil. The Cenote Ik Kil is about a 3km from Chichen Itza and a beautiful place to take a dip after touring the ruins. However, the sacred cenote is part of Chichen Itza itself and not a place for swiming as the water is stagnant. There's no reason not to go see it - especially because it's next to the bathrooms and snack stand, but don't be confused by the other reviews on this site.
Written September 1, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

LJYLeeds_UK
Leeds, UK20 contributions
Couples
Did this as part of Chichen Itza trip.
Water very cool and great after hot humid tour of Mayan ruins.
However you need to be fairly brave to launch yourself off the wooden ladders into such a deep water pool where there is no way of touching the bottom ever! The place is crowded with many nationalities of mixed ability swimmers who block the exit ladders by hanging on for grim death! This is fine until you need to exit and cannot reach the ladders.......

My solution is to definitely rent a life vest before descending into the sink hole area- about $3 USD each. Then floating becomes a pleasure and the many fish brushing round your legs will not freak you out as much!!
Written June 17, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

gloobalgal
Washington DC, DC52 contributions
Couples
You might as well walk to the end of the trail to see it, but the souvenir vendors put on a better show than the cenote at the end. In fact, I'm really regretting not buying some shirts from them...darn!
Written August 19, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Tomi T
Novo Mesto, Slovenia42 contributions
The Yucatán Peninsula is composed of carbonate and soluble rocks, mostly of limestone, although dolomite and evaporites are also present at different depths. The entire Yucatán Peninsula is an opaque, lying Karst region. Recessed sunken caves, locally known as cenotes, are a common occurrence in the northern lowlands of the peninsula.

Cenote caves are karst caves that are completely or mostly flooded with water. Cenote can be an underground cave, an abyss or a cave. The name of the cenote is derived from the language of the ancient Mayans from the Yucatan Peninsula. Today, cenotes are important archeological sites, because in the civilization of the ancient Mayans, these sites were places where they threw gifts.
Written January 8, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

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Sacred Cenote (Chichen Itza) - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go

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