Sacred Cenote
Sacred Cenote
4
About
This natural well, spanning 60 meters in diameter and reaching a depth of 22 meters, was used by the Mayans as a sacrificial pit for virgins, warriors and even infants.
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Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

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4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles1,064 reviews
Excellent
398
Very good
307
Average
260
Poor
76
Terrible
23

Josh
California89 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2018 • Couples
Can't get a real good look down, but the fact there is so much in the cenonte make it amazing to see. All the offerings were thrown into this place, from gold to human sacrifices.
Written July 10, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

ChutTheGuy
Darien, IL124 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2015 • Couples
I think some people writing these reviews are confusing the Sacred Cenote and Ik Kil Cenote, which is not part of the Chichen Itza ruins. You CANNOT go up to the water or swimming in this cenote; there is no way in or out. In fact, the Mayans used to throw people in because then they couldn't get out. I also noticed most of the pictures associated with this cenote are actually of the Ik Kil Cenote where you can go swimming. Please do not confuse the two; don't bring your beach towels to this exhibit.
Written January 29, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Phonse F
St. John's, Canada2 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2015 • Friends
My brother-in-law and I swam in the sinkhole after a long hot trek through the ruins and it felt very refreshing at the time. However, towards the end of the swim my brother-in-law pointed out that there are hundreds of tiny birds nesting in little round holes that have been pecked out of the soft limestone walls. Generations of these birds have likely been resident in the walls for thousands of years, with thousands of years of bird droppings being dissolved in the water. I left the 'pool' shortly after considering the implications of the resident bird population and became even more concerned when, I felt a sore throat coming on within an hour of leaving the water. Gargled with salt water, and drank a couple of straight whiskeys to attack the bacteria which seemed to do the job for me, but my brother in law was stomach sick for several days after our swim. My question: Considering the presence of these birds and perhaps other wildlife whose waste is inexorably building up in this pool, as well as the hundreds of swimmers who urinate in it every day, is this water being treated to kill bacteria? Is it tested at all? I would not risk swimming there again until I had satisfactory answers to these questions.
Written June 18, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Kristen Y
Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States2 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2013 • Friends
I believe about 90% of people who reviewed this cenote confused it with the Cenote Ik Kil. The Cenote Ik Kil is about a 3km from Chichen Itza and a beautiful place to take a dip after touring the ruins. However, the sacred cenote is part of Chichen Itza itself and not a place for swiming as the water is stagnant. There's no reason not to go see it - especially because it's next to the bathrooms and snack stand, but don't be confused by the other reviews on this site.
Written September 1, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

LJYLeeds_UK
Leeds, UK25 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2013 • Couples
Did this as part of Chichen Itza trip.
Water very cool and great after hot humid tour of Mayan ruins.
However you need to be fairly brave to launch yourself off the wooden ladders into such a deep water pool where there is no way of touching the bottom ever! The place is crowded with many nationalities of mixed ability swimmers who block the exit ladders by hanging on for grim death! This is fine until you need to exit and cannot reach the ladders.......

My solution is to definitely rent a life vest before descending into the sink hole area- about $3 USD each. Then floating becomes a pleasure and the many fish brushing round your legs will not freak you out as much!!
Written June 17, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

gloobalgal
Washington DC, DC50 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2013 • Couples
You might as well walk to the end of the trail to see it, but the souvenir vendors put on a better show than the cenote at the end. In fact, I'm really regretting not buying some shirts from them...darn!
Written August 19, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Tomi T
Novo Mesto, Slovenia42 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2019
The Yucatán Peninsula is composed of carbonate and soluble rocks, mostly of limestone, although dolomite and evaporites are also present at different depths. The entire Yucatán Peninsula is an opaque, lying Karst region. Recessed sunken caves, locally known as cenotes, are a common occurrence in the northern lowlands of the peninsula.

Cenote caves are karst caves that are completely or mostly flooded with water. Cenote can be an underground cave, an abyss or a cave. The name of the cenote is derived from the language of the ancient Mayans from the Yucatan Peninsula. Today, cenotes are important archeological sites, because in the civilization of the ancient Mayans, these sites were places where they threw gifts.
Written January 8, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Katie
Millington, TN82 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2018 • Couples
There wasn't much to see here. It was barely visible when I was there. The locals said it had collapsed recently. Every entrance was blocked off and we could only see a small portion of green water. Not the view I was expecting for sure. I would forego this one for some of the more accessible cenotes.
Written March 10, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

UniversalTraversal
Oakville, Canada830 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2017 • Couples
A lot of reviewers have submitted their reviews in the incorrect place. This is the cenote actually in the Chichen Itza site and it is not accessible, though you can get a view from above and learn about its role centuries ago. Apparently there is evidence that this was used as a sacrifice site during the Mayan empire.

The cenote NEAR Chichen Itza that you can swim in is Cenote Ik Kil and is definitely worth a visit.
Written March 12, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

bambilovesthumper
Johannesburg, South Africa50 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2014 • Couples
This is the cenote inside the Chichen Itza, you may not swim in this one. There are some reviews confusing it with the Ik-kil cenote which is a few kilometers down the road which you can swim in and has stairs etc.
Written November 20, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Sacred Cenote - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (2024)

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