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ATV Jungle Adventure
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JohninTO wrote a review Mar 2018
Toronto, Canada44 contributions59 helpful votes
So my wife asked me to hold off on writing this review for a week to see if I would cool down a little and be more calm. Not so much. I do want to point out first of all that this excursion is not fun – it is extremely dirty and dusty – so much so that there are points in the drive where you cannot see the ATV in front of you through the dust. So do not take anything that you care about – sunglasses, clothes, backpack, shoes, etc – the dirt doesn’t come out. My sunglasses have been ruined – it’s like they’ve been sandblasted. My backpack had dust inside it, so my cell phone and camera were dusty. The “road”, “trail”, “path” or whatever they call it up to the falls is dangerous – there are holes, gullies, cuts, construction, animals, no guardrails, 50 metre cliffs, etc. You do not have an opportunity to take in the scenery because the trail is so dangerous. And finally, the machinery – the ATVs are poorly cared for – the brakes are suspect, the tires are balding and mechanical pieces were hanging off the bottom and dragging in the dirt beneath two of our 5 ATVs. Some of them were so old, beaten and mis-used; we could barely go 2 kilometres without having them stall out, so we’d have to stop to pour water over the sensors because they were overheating. If you are contemplating taking this trip, beware that the instruction is poor or misleading – if you are not very familiar with ATVs, I do not suggest trying it. The “instructor” – Denis – talked about snow and ice and bears more than he told us how to use the brakes and throttle or how to drive an ATV. His long explanation on how to change gears was ridiculous – so much so that those in our group driving with automatic transmissions thought that the rear brake was the gear lever. The sum total on driving instruction was driving. He talked about it for 5 or 10 minutes, made us sign a waiver and we got on our machines and left. On the trip, about 5 kilometers into the drive, my wife, who I was following, braked on a downhill (I saw her brake light come on), and her machine jerked to the left, didn’t slow down (the brake light was on the whole time), and proceeded to drive her off a 60 or 70 foot cliff. Thankfully, she had the presence of mind to jump off at the last second and she caught the lip of the cliff with her hands or else she would have gone over too. The second guide and I were able to help her up and alert the others. They ran back as a tour bus (from the same company, coincidentally), arrived. The first thing Denis said as he arrived was, “that’s why they shouldn’t allow beginners on this tour.” Very nice. With the help of some of the tourists, we were able to push the ATV out from the bottom of the gully, back onto the road. There was damage to the transmission but my wife wasn’t too keen on continuing the tour anyway. But Denis’ quick check of the mechanicals determined that the ATV had been perfectly safe and that the cause of the accident was driver error. (Yes this is sarcasm). The tour bus driver offered to take my wife the rest of the way to the falls. At no point was there any medical assistance or supplies offered – they had none. We finished the tour up and walked to the falls – my wife was in obvious pain and still bleeding, with some pretty significant bruises already appearing. The bus driver got her a shot of Mescal at the top, that’s it. She washed herself off in the river. None of us in our group were too keen on driving back, given how crappy the conditions were and how poorly the machines were maintained, but we didn’t have much choice. When we arrived at the final checkpoint, I was informed by Denis that my wife’s machine had been picked up and taken to the local ATV dealership. Given that my wife was on a separate bus, I said that I did not want to deal with that right now and I wanted to see my wife, back at our resort. I made that quite clear. Nonetheless, our pick up bus stopped at the dealership where we were met by a Paradiso Huatulo company representative and the company lawyer. They presented me with a repair quote (interesting that they quoted without having a key to start the machine (Denis had it in his pocket when we arrived)). It was pretty apparent that they wanted me to pay immediately because the company representative arrived with a credit card machine in her hand and told me how much I had to pay. When I said no, take me back to the resort, the lawyer threatened to keep me in the country and they all continued to press me to pay. Eventually they allowed the bus driver to take us to the resort, where the company representative and the lawyer ganged up on me again. One of my friends had to get the manager of the hotel to intervene and to force them to agree to a meeting the next morning. The next morning, the lawyer handed both my wife and I an order, signed by the local police, forbidding us from leaving Mexico. It also indicated that we were to appear in court the next afternoon (we were schedule to leave the next morning). They brought the same repair quote from the night before – no additional examination of the machine had occurred, so it was obvious that this amount was a complete fabrication. To make peace and to not have to spend our final day in a legal meeting, after an hour of very heated arguing, I offered to pay half of the quote – that we would accept half of the issue, if they accepted their half. They said no. After another ½ hour, we agreed to an amount and I paid, once the rep. was able to come up with the credit card machine. It took another 10 hours and two visits from the lawyer to come up with the release form, allowing us to leave – he was able to spell our names correctly to keep us in the country, but couldn’t seem to spell them to allow us out. Overall, this was an absolutely terrible experience. The injuries, the literal possible death or severe injury to my wife, the legal repercussions and pressure, the trail conditions, the instruction, the equipment were all ghastly. I frankly could not imagine a worse experience while on holiday. I hope that I have been clear - DO NOT TAKE THIS TOUR.
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Date of experience: March 2018
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Minn T wrote a review Nov 2016
Minneapolis, Minnesota59 contributions19 helpful votes
We did this tour when our cruise ship was in Huatulco. We booked through Viator and the phone numbers provided to book our pickup did not work. We figured out that we could easily walk from from the cruise ship to the offices for the tour. We also emailed with a few questions and there was definitely a language barrier and then some confusion about our questions. We got some training on the ATV's prior to taking them on the trails and the guides were concerned for our safety. The guides were nice and took pictures of us. Part of the trails were steep with sharp turns and washed out portions. Most of the trip was on better trails and roads. The beach, town and restaurant were great. The beach was beautiful and I wish there was more time to spend there and at the restaurant. We ordered the quacamole and the quesadillas. Another couple had the ceviche and it was tasty. I would suggest that you wear long pants and a long sleeve shirt. That will help with the scrapes and bug bites. You should bring a bandana and sunglasses. If you have goggles you should bring them. They will keep some of the dirt our of your eyes. It was extremely dusty.
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Date of experience: November 2016
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Avid_traveler0710 wrote a review Mar 2016
Maple Valley, Washington820 contributions38 helpful votes
My family and I chose this excursion during our cruise to Honduras. I was a little nervous as it was my first time, but with the help of Roger, I adapted quickly and was more confident the remainder of the activity. It was about an hour and 45 minutes ride through the jungle, stopping at some key areas in which he provided information. There was about 15 of us and we were all safe and no injuries overall. Safety was the number one priority. It was a great experience and from what the others were saying that have done the ATV adventure at other locations, this was the best in the Caribbean. A must!!!
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Date of experience: March 2016
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Lulu wrote a review Mar 2016
105 contributions12 helpful votes
This was definitely an amazing experience!!! We had a blast!!! Great tour guide!!! Great for beginners and advance riders. Depending on your skill level the tour guides adjust to you! We got to go off roading in the bush also riding in the mountains and beach! We stopped for a really nice meal for lunch and a cute town which we go to sample locally grown vegetables and fruit! I would recommend this tour to all!!! A tip: if you are going as a duo bring a towel that you can put on the rack so your behind doesn't get bruised along with sunscreen or a loner sleeved shirt! Because it's deceiving how much sun you are actually getting.
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Date of experience: March 2016
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Donna B wrote a review Nov 2015
Tracy, California5 contributions3 helpful votes
We rented three ATV's...Cost us $150 USD and was worth every penny. The staff was very courteous and watchful of our safety and comfort. Wise to bring a bottle of water with you, long pants and some mosquito spray. One of our guides took candid pictures of use throughout the trail and we purchased all of them. Lots of fun going down a dirt trail to the river and back. Not dangerous at all. We would do it again!
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Date of experience: November 2015
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