La Soufriere Cross Country Trail

La Soufriere Cross Country Trail

La Soufriere Cross Country Trail
4.5
About
The La Soufriere Cross Country Trail winds its way from sea level up to the top of the majestic La Soufriere Volcano (4048ft/ 1178m). Granite cliffs reach for the sky, giving way to sweeping valleys and deep gorges and eventually the immense volcanic crater. The walk to the crater is moderately difficult, and takes about two hours uphill from the windward side. The La Soufriere Cross Country Trail snakes across the width of St Vincent, and can be walked from either the leeward or windward coast. The total trail is approximately 9 miles (15 km) long and offers breath-taking panoramic views of the surrounding land and seascape and close encounters with fauna.
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Goneaway50
Chirripo National Park, Costa Rica57 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2023
The windward trail to La Soufriere is not officially open but can be done. I understand the leeward trail is not yet passable. The windward trail is in good condition at the beginning having been rebuilt since the eruption with not a lot a traffic. About 2/3 up, the trail deteriorates considerably once you are out of the trees. The trail can be difficult to follow with lots of loose material and erosion of volcanic deposit. When we went, the top of the mountain was heavily clouded with very strong winds blowing you towards the crater's edge. We passed on hiking into the crater itself and headed back down. The trip was about 4 hours up and down. There is no way I could have done this trip without a guide. The chances of losing the trail particularly in the clouds is too great. It was a good challenge and we are glad we did it. But its not easy so be well prepared.
Written January 26, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

5.0 of 5 bubbles
The hike up La Soufriere may seem endless and exhausting, but looking down into the crater is well worth the trip. The trail is very clear until you reach the crater rim, where it branches in many directions. A rope-assisted climb down into the crater offers an up-close view of the lava dome and a patch of steaming sulfur, as well as the remains of the crater lake. The top of the volcano is frequently covered in clouds, but may clear up for part of the day. Be sure to pack a wind-breaker layer or rain gear because it can be chilly with the high winds, or rain suddenly at the crater rim. In fact, the winds were so strong it was hard to keep balance while walking. Be sure to stop in Georgetown at the police station to inform them of your intended hike - there have been many reported thefts related to vehicles parked at the trailhead. The police will offer an escort for your vehicle. Enjoy!!
Written January 20, 2002
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Tami S
Palm Springs, CA26 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
The trail's well marked all the way up. Once at the top, you can go right for another 30-40 mnt hike along the rim to a lake (NOT the one in the crater) for a refreshing swim if you come prepared with bathing suit, towel, etc. You can also go left along the rim - better trail - for more views. Mist can move in real fast, be prepared for breathtaking view of the ocean once it clears. Bring a camera.

Some tips:
- 3rd Saturday in Jan and the 3rd Sat in August every year; a grp of 200 American med students takes to the trail. Just a heads up in case you'd like to join/avoid them. If joining, a positive thing is that in case you get hurt, there'd be at least a dozen EMT/firemen/chiropractors/scouts/personal trainers in the crowd to not only give you excellent emergency medical attention, but even carry you down the mountain in make shift stretcher :)

- Bug repellant; you stand still longer than 1 mnt, you're entree - regardless of the time of year.

- Wear VERY comfortable sneakers with socks; (unless you're Dr Baer and do this hike every weekend, twice on Sundays!) you'll have enough protest from your knees, quads and glutes to want to add a foot callous to the list.

- Don't burdern yourself - leave the wallet/keychains/kitchen sink at home. Just car key, ID, basic first aid kit, personal emergency meds(inhaler, nitroG), parka, camera, light lunch (an apple & a sandwich), empty grocery bag for trash, swiss army knife plus 1 ft of duct tape - McGyver says "never leave home without it" ;) & coz you just never know!

- Use restrooms at the trailhead and you probably won't need to go in the brush on the trail. Even if you drink water all along the way, you sweat/breathe out enough moisture to keep from filling up your bladder.

- Make most of the weight you're carrying water bottles. Humidity combined with physical exertion makes you sweat, plus the insensible water loss w/ strained breathing can dehydrate you quickly and make your hardworking muscles cramp. Not fun. Drink of choice - rehydrating (water/gatorade) instead of dehydrating (soda/ice tea).

- I would advise against going alone; the lava rocks in the last 1/2 hour near the top are barely a 'trail', make for extremely treacherous stepping and can send you flying into a v. nasty fall. Contrary to popular belief, the terrain is indifferent to the extent of your individual expertise and mountain savvy, it just doesn't care.

- Cellphones: unless you have 1 of those amazing satellite phones that can call Jupiter from Earth, don't bother. No DigiCel, C&W, Cingular service once you're afew yards into the rainforest.

The first time I went was in the Fall, temps in the 80-90's, humid as heck, it got really tedious really fast & I had to start load shedding my backpack about quarter of the way up. I stashed water bottles along the way and had enough to just last me till the top. On the way down, I reclaimed my stash & continued to rehydrate on the way down.
In the spring, though, the weather is fantastic! Still extremely humid, it was downright COLD at the top, specially with the wind and mist. Stash fleece in your backpak if you're going in the Spring. Sit down for lunch at the rim...it's quite a spot!

Enjoy.
Written January 30, 2006
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Thank you for visiting, we are happy that you enjoyed the hike and views, also your tips will be useful to persons who are planning to take a hike up to soufriere. Thank you for sharing your tips and do come again.
Written August 29, 2016
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Mekamouse
London19 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Been to the La soufriere back in 1995 and it was great fun. Went back recently and it was not fun at all because:
1. You muct check the weather forecasts before you go. There is always a bit of mist in the mountains, but if its a really poor day then you wont see anything at all in the crater. it was raining and cold too, so bring some warm clothing.
2. We used HAzeco this time around.....rip off merchants. For 90US per person you get a small sandwich bought in a garage, one bottle of water, travel to and from your hotel and a guide who gets a small pittance for the trip. Beware also when you want to venture inside the crater. You need to use a rope to descend as the pool for swimming and the mud-bath is at the bottom....their website is very misleading and claims that using the rope is for the adventurous. I would change that to the suicidal. The descent into the crater takes about an hour of very strenuous activity using a rope down a small and often dangerous channel. We had no protective equipment, our guide has no first aid knowledge or kit. I was surprised there wasn't a major accident involving falling rocks or falls. If there was an accident hazeco could be sued for thousands, emphasizing what a charlatan outfit hazeco is. My advice is to use an independent tour guide with a genuine interest in la soufriere and it will cost considerably less.
Written May 22, 2008
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Thank you for visiting and sharing your comments which would be useful to other persons who would like to go on this hike.
Written September 15, 2016
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

TMR1004
Valley Forge, PA397 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2018 • Solo
1. Introduction
Soufriere is the highest mountain on St. Vincent. It is an active volcano that last erupted in 1979, and a hike to the crater rim is one of the most beautiful hikes in the Caribbean. The crater itself is huge and impressive, and if you get the opportunity to hike down into it, the scenery is other-wordly. I had trouble getting good information on this hike before doing it, so I thought I would provide some information and write about my experience in the hopes that it may encourage others to enjoy this magnificent experience.

2. Trailhead
There are two trail heads

A) Rabacca (Windward side) – by far the most popular. It is the shortest route to the top and is the most accessible trailhead for most people. To get to the trailhead from Kingstown takes a little over one hour. Head toward Georgetown and New Sandy Bay using the main road on the east coast. Turn left in Rabacca at the small road with a sign directing you toward La Soufriere volcano. It is a 10 minute drive up this narrow, but paved road.
B) Richmond (Leeward side) – A hike with more vertical elevation, and a longer but gentler ascent. My guide told me that it was as beautiful as the route from Rabacca.

3. Options
There are numerous options for this hike.

A. Rabacaa out and back (Windward side) – to rim and return (roundtrip) - 5 miles
B. Richmond out and back (Leeward side) – to rim and return (roundtrip) - 10 miles
C. Cross country – start at either Rabacca or Richmond and walk from one trailhead to the other. The trails are connected by a 1 +/- mile trail along the rim - 8 ½ miles
D. Descending into the crater - About one mile to the west (left) from where the trail from Rabacca junctions with the rim trail, there is a challenging route leading down into the caldera. It is a very steep descent with ropes lining the entire route. The descent is about 350 vertical ft. and takes 15-20 minutes.
E. About ½ mile to the east (right) from the junction of the Rabacaa Trail and the rim trail is the old Caldera. There is a good view of the lake at the bottom and it is a very easy descent which takes less than 10 minutes.

*I hiked from Rabacca to the rim and then along the rim trail to the ropes and descended to the volcano floor. I returned along the same route. This review is about the route I took.

4. Guides
A guide is not mandatory, but I would recommend using one – The trail is very easy to follow on your own until you get close to the crater rim. After this, the trail becomes more indistinct in the rocks and a guide is useful here. In addition, if you plan to walk along the crater rim and then descend into the crater using the ropes, I would highly recommend using a guide. I used Trunos Fraser from Fraser Taxi and Tours. He was very knowledgeable, friendly, and a pleasure to hike with. His contact information is coach_fraser@hotmail.com

5. Best time of year
This is a very wet area. There is no real dry season, although it does rain less from mid Dec. through May. The least wet months are Feb. – April, but even during these months it rains on over half of the days. Mornings are generally more clear than afternoons. Be prepared for wet conditions.

6. Elevations
Trail head at Rabacca 1,350 ft.
Rim trail of Caldera where it junctions with the Rabacca Trail 2,850 ft.

The actual high point of Soufriere Mtn. is not on the crater rim and there is no established path to it. It is on the old caldera rim on the north side of the volcano. The elevation of the summit is 4,049 ft.

7. Vertical elevation (ascent)
Rabacca Trail out and back 1,600 vt. ft.
Rabacca Trail out and back including the descent into the caldera 2,300 vt. ft.

8. Trail description
Rabacca side – The trail starts out on a beautiful single track dirt path through rainforest. The inclination of the trail is moderate up until about the half-way point, which is marked by a metal post on the right side of the trail. The sign itself has been removed. The trail steepens after this until you reach Jacob’s Well, a lava flow that will have a small stream that you will have to cross. This marks approximately the ¾ point of the trail. Above this, the trail steepens again and you are walking through montaine thicket – only about head high until you reach the rim of the volcano.

9. Water along trail
There is good water at Jacob’s Well. Treatment is recommended

10. What to bring
Good footwear is a must– either boots or sneakers with good grip and traction are important. The trail can be slippery.
1-2 liters of water depending on if you are willing to treat water along the trail
Food
Sun lotion – Above Jacob’s Well, there is a lot of sun exposure
Hat with brim and sunglasses
Raincoat – Even in dry season be prepared. In addition, the winds can really pick up near the rim and your raincoat can double as a windbreaker
Hiking pole – optional, but helpful
Gloves – Optional, but helpful if you plan to descend into the caldera using the ropes

11. Time estimates – This is always a difficult thing to predict due to differences in weather, fitness, trail conditions, how often you stop to take pictures, etc. But I believe the estimates below are good for most people in reasonable hiking condition.
From the trail head near Rabacca (Windward side) to the rim (one way) 1 ½ - 2 ½ hrs
From the trail head near Richmond (Leeward side) to the rim (one way) 2 ½ - 3 ½ hrs
From the junction of the Rabacca Trail and the Rim Trail to the ropes leading to the descent into the caldera – ½ - ¾ hrs
Descent into crater and ascent using ropes – roundtrip ½-1 hr.

12. Level of difficulty
Anyone in reasonable hiking condition can do either the climb from Rabacca or Richmond. The descent into the caldera is more challenging. Anyone with a fear of heights, or without the necessary conditioning to use the ropes to descend or ascend should probably not attempt this, especially without a guide.

13. Conclusion
Climbing La Soufriere was the highlight of my time on St. Vincent. I hope that you will enjoy it as much as I did.

14. Other reviews of hikes in the Caribbean by ArgusTMR on TripAdvisor
1) Gros Piton – St. Lucia – May 2018
2) Petit Piton – St. Lucia - May 2018
3) Boiling Lake – Dominica – May 2018
4) Liamuiga Volcano – St. Kitts – May 2018
5) Nevis Peak – St. Nevis – May 2018
6) Pico Duarte – Dominican Republic – December 2013
7) El Mogote – Dominican Republic – June 2013
8) Isabel de Torres – Dominican Republic – July 2014
Written May 7, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Thank you for visiting the La Soufriere Cross Country Trail and for taking the time to review your experience of the hike. We are very pleased to hear that you had a excellent time and we really enjoyed looking at your photos . Looking forward to seeing you again soon.
Written July 17, 2018
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

djpboston
Arlington, MA37 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Go to La Soufriere !

I stayed on Bequia a couple years ago and was dying to see the volcano and more than just the tourist version of SVG. I was not dissappointed. After taking the ferry from Bequia at 6 AM, we met our guide -- HazEco Tours -- at the docks in St. Vincent. Certainly a place you want to arrange for someone to pick you up - especially if this is your first time to the real Carribbean. Cliff took us on a wonderful winding ride around St. Vincent on our way to the volcano. Since he's lived there so loing we heard lots of fun stories and history of the island. After drivng past banana and sugar cane plantations, we ended up at the base of the volcano with a short hike through some rain forest. The hike was not for the faint of heart but it was never dangerous. Hiking boots not required but recommended. Sandals are NOT recommended. The view from the top was spectacular. Well worth the effort and the drive up the coast of St. Vincent. I've been there twice now and will return again once my daughter is old enough to make the climb. If you are adventurous, you can even climb down into the crater of La Soufiere but I understand that's possible only on a calm day -- and certainly only with the right group. Thanks to the folks at HazEco - Had a wonderful time. Can't wait to come back.
Written May 2, 2006
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Thank you for visiting our site, we are pleased that you enjoyed the hike and the view. see you soon.
Written August 29, 2016
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

NYMichele
Tobago69 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2018 • Family
I am so happy we did this yesterday. We are a family of four with two teenage sons. As a former athlete, I exercise regularly but very moderately and am older and definitely over-the-hill, having had three surgeries on my knees and total ACL replacement two years ago. But we made it and it was so much fun. We did the Windward Rebacca trail, which was more than long enough (the leeward trail is longer and a longer drive to get there). The rain forest, then palm forest, and the literally in-the-clouds rocky upper portion of the hike were each breathtaking. We were socked in a cloud at the top and only saw abyss rather than the crater. Such is nature. But it was still amazing and the high point of our trip (pun intended).

So, here is the most important thing: we used Trunos Fraser (1-784-530-8138), who other reviewers recommended. We have had adventures all over the Americas, and are knowledgeable consumers: Fraser was extremely reasonably priced and, more importantly, a PERFECT guide. He was flawless in pre-hike communication, punctual for pickup, has a great personality, brought everything we might have needed to eat or drink on the trail, made sure our family hiked at a pace that was right for our level of conditioning so we wouldn't gas out halfway up, and made sure we were safe (the rocks can get slippery, especially coming down). He knew the forest and pointed out cool things and clearly loves his work (isn't just trying to get up and down as quickly as possible). As part of the day, after the hike, he took us to the Owia Salt Pond and lunch (the best roti I ever had -- although I may have been somewhat influenced by hunger after hiking a 4000 foot volcano). The salt pond is amazing and we wouldn't have gotten to see them if Fraser hadn't included it in the day. All told, I just can't say enough about Trunos Fraser and this hike.
Written July 1, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Janette P
Victoria, Canada80 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2015
My husband and I climbed La Soufriere yesterday.(4049 Ft. and the highest peek in St Vincent and the Grenades.) What an experience! Trunos Fraser "Fraser" was our tour guide. (His business card is attached in our photos.) We would recommend him to anyone who needs an awesome tour guide in St Vincent. He excels in customer service and has a passion for this industry.
Prior to our hike he met up with us on his own time to find out what we wanted out of our excursion. This to us was exceptional service and we were both impressed. He made sure we would wear light clothing, proper runners / hiking shoes, bring enough water and food and make sure we were bringing a light jacket in case of the wind / rain.
During our hike Fraser brought extra water and fruit to make sure we were well nourished. We brought our own snacks and 1.5 letters of water each, but in the end we needed more water and his snacks also came in handy during our hike. He said that this was part of his service.
We hiked up La Soufriere from the windward side. After taking a break at the top of the crater we hiked around to the leeward side to see the extraordinary view and different angles of the volcano. The views were breathtaking! From looking down into the volcano, to the ocean views and looking back over the rainforest mountains. It was amazing!
This was a once in a lifetime experience that I know we will defiantly do again next time we come back to St Vincent. See you next time Fraser!
Amazing, amazing, amazing..... (I can't say it enough times.)
Written November 19, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Thank you for visiting, we are happy that you had an amazing experience and the views were great. see you soon :).
Written August 31, 2016
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Ian C
Guelph, Canada38 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2013 • Solo
I went from the windward side whiich is easier because you start half way up the mountain, but I went into the crater by rope which took another hour. Hurricaine Tomas had totally destroyed the leeward trail. All the old trees had fallen across the trail. I have done the trail before. It wasn't very enjoyable this time, often slippery on steep slopes beside the trail. I was late getting down, got to Kingstown after dark. Everyone looked at me, a white man in Kingstown after dark. I guess that is rare. Rare but no problem. I rarely travel in Kingstown after dark. I watch the sunset from my apartment and get ready for bed. I have never had any problem in Kingstown, even after dark. The town changes somewhat, but they are all Vincentians, and very proud of it.
Written March 8, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Thank you for visiting and sharing your comments. Come again soon.
Written September 15, 2016
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

RnBTrips
Toronto, Ontario, Canada132 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2015 • Friends
Difficulty: Challenging
Location: Saint Vincent, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Elevation: 4,048 feet above sea level
Length: 1.5-2 hours uphill, 1.5 hours downhill.
Guide: We booked with Trunos Fraser who took us through the rainforest on the windward side but there are other operators in St. Vincent like Richmond Vale Hiking which offers the leeward side which is a longer, more exposed hike.
Cost: $90 US/person, included pick-up and drop-off at our house
Status: Active. Prior eruptions, according to Discover SVG:
1718 Explosive Eruption
1780 Dome building eruption
1812 Explosive eruption (more than 56 fatalities)
1880 Dome building eruption
1902-03 Explosive eruption (more than 1565 fatalities)
1971-72 Dome building eruption
1979 Explosive eruption, no fatalities

Our guide, Fraser, drove us up the windward side of St. Vincent along the coast through lush rainforest and banana plantations while telling us about the history of the island. It’s a beautiful drive if you can stomach the swift turns, steep cliffs and sweeping vistas, not to mention the narrow roads filled with people and dogs and goats. At the very least, you’ll be thankful you didn’t drive yourself. The drive is just part of the adventure, of course, and when we stepped out at the trailhead with a path leading into an immense jungle of seemingly overgrown plants and trees, we were stoked. Wielding a machete and a slick sense of humour, Fraser hacked away at some bamboo along the path to carve us all walking sticks.

Armed with our sticks and bottles of water, all provided by Fraser, we set out on our hike. We were told by another islander that we should wear long pants but we all went with shorts and were very thankful we did because it was so humid and moist hiking through the dense rainforest. “Oh, come onnn,” Fraser said, his trademark reaction to our tourist uncertainties like wearing pants or our wonderment that peanuts don’t grow on trees. He puts you at ease and you start to get the sense of what it’s like to live in Vincy.

What’s great about hiking with a proper guide, along with their knowledge and experience, is they require you to take water breaks which Fraser did, regularly. He handed us fresh fruit grown on the island, oranges and pineapple.

Soon the trees cleared and we were hiking in the clouds. It was quite breezy, as you can see in our hiking video, which moved the clouds long enough that we could still catch glimpses of the beautiful coastline and Caribbean sea.

A challenging hike to the top — at times you have to scramble and use your arms to navigate big boulders and slippery rocks — is rewarded with a view of the massive crater.

But the climb didn’t end there. Fraser took us around the rim to the other side where we could get a view of the smouldering sulfur cap (Soufriere = sulfurer) and catch a glimpse of the leeward ascent and marijuana farms. I would like to do that path sometime, but truly it didn’t look as interesting as the windward side.

Unfortunately, Evan didn’t make it this far. The speed of the rolling clouds combined with the height of the rim threw him off so much that he had to sit down and wait for us to return. So that serves as a warning to anyone who suffers from vertigo or fear of heights; not that Ev has a problem with heights, but if you watch the video, you’ll see how easy it would be to get affected. At this end of the crater, there is an option to descend with the help of a rope to explore the bottom, but we were well satisfied with the extent of the hike, and we wanted to make sure E-Bone was ok.

But Evan was just fine after sitting down for a few minutes, and we began our descent. In case you don’t already know, going down a mountain is often harder than going up. You have to protect your joints by planting the walking stick firmly in front of you as you descend slowly, and be careful of loose rocks and dew-covered tree roots.

Fraser is not only a great guide, but he is a wealth of knowledge with the memory and intellect of a true historian and scholar. Everywhere he looked there was information to be shared with us, and if you get the chance, ask him to tell you about the last eruption in 1979. “I remember it like it was yesterday,” he began to tell us.

He came upon some Soufrière Grass, indigenous to the volcano, and offered it to Evan to take home as proof that he ascended. Ev brought it back to our house but decided against trying to sneak it through customs. I’m now reminded of Hawaii’s Pele’s Curse and wonder if there’s a similar superstition of taking souvenirs from this island volcano. I can hear Fraser’s response: “Oh, come onnn.”

We were happy to get back to the parking lot (there are washrooms and a site office). With the elevation, change in atmosphere, and all the excitement, 4 hours felt like a long hike. I don’t imagine he has these all the time so I don’t want to build expectations of him, but Fraser happened to have a couple tall cans of beer that we shared happily. Hiking La Soufrière went beyond our expectations and our bodies and spirits felt enlivened.
Written December 9, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Thank you for visiting, we are happy that you enjoyed the hike and the view. We hope you will come again to hike soon.
Written August 31, 2016
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

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La Soufriere Cross Country Trail - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (2024)

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