Daitiangong

Daitiangong, Gushan

Daitiangong
3.5
What people are saying
SOH KIEN PENG
By SOH KIEN PENG
Spiritual pillar
Jan 2015
I was on a morning stroll to Xiziwan and the British Consulate when I passed by this temple. The temple has the unique southern Chinese architectural style and appears delicate and exquisitely designed. It reminds me of the oldest Chinese Hokkein Temple in Singapore - Thian Hock Keng Temple. Thian Hock Keng Temple was built in 1839 while this temple was constructed in 1949 but both are equally impressive with the tiled roof decorated colorfully with miniature dragon sculptures and folklore figurines. The temple looks symmetrically ancient with the main hall and two side halls resembling the Trinity housing the many deities. The deities in the front three halls comprise the Heavenly God, the Mountain and Water God, the Black Faced General, the Water God, the Wenchang God and so forth. At the rear there is another hall that houses the Buddha, the Kuanyin Goddess and the 18 Lo Han (Arhats). This is typical of most Chinese temples where Buddhism and Taoism deities share the same roof though philosophically they may be different. To the migrant Chinese, having a good livelihood is important and religion satisfies that inner spiritual vacuum and aids in providing a psychological support to those searching for peace and prosperity in a new place. There has never been any major religious conflicts among the Chinese people. Whether Tibetan Buddhism, Mahayana Buddhism, Hinayana Buddhism, Taoism, Shaolin Buddhism, all the deities from the different paths can be housed in one temple without any issue as the Chinese believe `All for one and one for All.'. There are shops within the temple compound but they were closed when I was there. I understand the night market in front of the temple attracted quite a crowd at night. The Temple was constructed by the migrants from Tainan who settled in Kaohsiung for work and the temple acted as their spiritual pillar. Unlike mainland China where many such temples were vandalized and damaged during the Proletarian Cultural Revolution, you see many Taoist temples remain well preserved in Taiwan. It reflects the rich heritage and cultural diversity of the Taiwanese people.

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3.5
27 reviews
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Kimitaka S
Taichung, Taiwan11,151 contributions
Snacks stands
Jun 2019 • Solo
Daiten Gong is a temple near MRT Xiziwan station. If you walk from the station to ferry pier, you can find easily it. In front of the temple is a empty square, and there some stands selling snacks.
Written July 6, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

SOH KIEN PENG
Singapore, Singapore6,315 contributions
Spiritual pillar
Jan 2015 • Friends
I was on a morning stroll to Xiziwan and the British Consulate when I passed by this temple. The temple has the unique southern Chinese architectural style and appears delicate and exquisitely designed.

It reminds me of the oldest Chinese Hokkein Temple in Singapore - Thian Hock Keng Temple. Thian Hock Keng Temple was built in 1839 while this temple was constructed in 1949 but both are equally impressive with the tiled roof decorated colorfully with miniature dragon sculptures and folklore figurines. The temple looks symmetrically ancient with the main hall and two side halls resembling the Trinity housing the many deities.

The deities in the front three halls comprise the Heavenly God, the Mountain and Water God, the Black Faced General, the Water God, the Wenchang God and so forth. At the rear there is another hall that houses the Buddha, the Kuanyin Goddess and the 18 Lo Han (Arhats).

This is typical of most Chinese temples where Buddhism and Taoism deities share the same roof though philosophically they may be different. To the migrant Chinese, having a good livelihood is important and religion satisfies that inner spiritual vacuum and aids in providing a psychological support to those searching for peace and prosperity in a new place. There has never been any major religious conflicts among the Chinese people. Whether Tibetan Buddhism, Mahayana Buddhism, Hinayana Buddhism, Taoism, Shaolin Buddhism, all the deities from the different paths can be housed in one temple without any issue as the Chinese believe `All for one and one for All.'.

There are shops within the temple compound but they were closed when I was there. I understand the night market in front of the temple attracted quite a crowd at night.

The Temple was constructed by the migrants from Tainan who settled in Kaohsiung for work and the temple acted as their spiritual pillar. Unlike mainland China where many such temples were vandalized and damaged during the Proletarian Cultural Revolution, you see many Taoist temples remain well preserved in Taiwan. It reflects the rich heritage and cultural diversity of the Taiwanese people.
Written December 23, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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