Nat Taung Kyaung Monastery
Nat Taung Kyaung Monastery
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Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.


4.0
21 reviews
Excellent
6
Very good
12
Average
2
Poor
1
Terrible
0

Raelene H
Melbourne, Australia1,508 contributions
Oct 2016 • Couples
This beautiful teak monastery has wonderfully complex and intricate carvings covering the outside and decorating the interior. In a quiet area, not inundated with tourists and set in a treed location it is beautifully peaceful, and you can walk around taking photos, and just looking at the outstanding level of craftsmanship. Will not disappoint - and a change from the normal Bagan pagodas.
Written November 29, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

KodoDrummer
Buenos Aires, Argentina64,995 contributions
Nov 2017 • Friends
On the trip I went to a few monasteries. These are graceful and holly places. Since there are already photos of the monastery buildings, I concentrated on the little Shami, who one day will become a wise monk.
. . .
Burmese Buddhists must become monks once in their lives, and many times. The under-20s are called Shami, and the over-20s are called monks, usually at the age of seven or eight. The shortest time is a week, the longest life. Xiao Sha Mi and the monks are in a very high position. Because they observe the 5 precepts and 10 commandments, and the ordinary lay-people observe only five (being not to take life, not to steal, not to commit unchastity, not to tell lies, not to drink intoxicants), the President and the government officials show great respect when they see them.

In light of the holiness of the monastery, I’ll rate it as excellent, otherwise I would have selected very good from an average tourist interest standpoint.

Walking around the monastery and other places in Myanmar, I saw many females with a powder on their face. In Myanmar, 80% of girls use a powder made from the bark of the neem tree called tanaka. The powder is said to whiten, absorb oil, remove freckles, prevent insects, and block harmful sun rays.
Written November 30, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Noémie C
253 contributions
Nov 2017 • Couples
One of my favorite! Different from the rest of the temples! It's a beautiful monastery in teck completely carved
Every millimeters of the wood has been sculpted and its amazing!
We could visit the inside when we were there. Off the beaten track, no tourist (such a shame) and give you a change!

A must for me!
Written November 1, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Zwillingsseele
Munich, Germany4,339 contributions
Oct 2017 • Solo
This was my first teakwood monastery I ever saw and the guide who I was with, even stayed there as a child. It has incredible wood carvings and is absolutely unique. The best to go there is by a horse cart or an e-bike.
Written October 30, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Adrian T
Perth, Australia3,645 contributions
Nov 2016 • Couples
We went here as part of our tour and although the Monastery itself is quite beautiful form the outside, unfortunately were could not go inside at the time we visited, so a little disappointed.

This is also referred to as Myoe Daung Monastery and is in Leya Village.
Written July 18, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

FyingKiwi
Christchurch, New Zealand948 contributions
Dec 2016 • Solo
The original monastery has deteriorated so significantly, that it is now virtually unrecognizable. The current monastery has now shifted next door, in a slight replication of the original. Not really worth the effort to view, and accordingly cannot be found on Bagan maps provided to visitors.
Written December 31, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

satobt
Hilo, HI1,647 contributions
Nov 2016 • Solo
All wood temple. Very cool and intricate carvings all along the roofs of the temple. Inside wood planks are uneven and not level, very rustic feel to the whole place!
Written November 7, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
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Nat Taung Kyaung Monastery, Leya