Dasenech Village
Dasenech Village
4
Points of Interest & Landmarks
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Monday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sunday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
About
Duration: 1-2 hours
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The area
Address
Omorate Dasenech, Turmi 1000 Ethiopia

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.


4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles74 reviews
Excellent
35
Very good
23
Average
11
Poor
3
Terrible
2

ocycleschick
Weedsport, NY1,274 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2020
Our group of 17 visited this village and spent part of a day there. It was a great experience and we felt welcomed by everyone we came across. It was interesting learning about this tribes customs and culture. I was invited inside one of their homes which was an honor. I had a great time participating in some of their dances and songs and it really didn't seem touristy to me but rather a genuine experience with people who were happy to share their culture with others. I would highly recommend a stop by this village for a visit! The ride in the dugout canoe to cross the Omo River to get there was an experience in itself!
Written February 11, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Goretti
Nairobi, Kenya24 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2019
In one of my work trip to Dassanech, I took a lazy walk into the Village and ended up spending the night outside one of the manyattas with a filled up belly, tired muscles from all the singing and a contended heart. Apart from the Language barrier (a guide can be helpful), there's so much to learn about their culture and traditional songs rich in history and culture. Make sure to try the zigny Anjera as well
Written January 10, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Baby Jinka Tour & Travel
Jinka, Ethiopia9 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2019 • Friends
Dassanch village is nice village around the border of Kenya.They were called the people of Delta ,I were with my friends and we dance together with the Dassanch girls. A very nice village arounf omo valley.
Written March 2, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Robert S
Westbury, NY952 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2020
There are many tribal villages available to visit in this vast area. As you can see from the main Tripadvisor photo, this village was totally unique in the use of corrugated metal in their huts rather than traditional building materials. We were told that the traditional building materials were no longer available. Village life was quite interesting and the local people entertained us with a series of traditional dances, some of which they invited visitors to join. For whatever reason, the village had more paperwork and formalities involved in the visit than the other tribes we visited in the Omo River Valley. The Dasenech village is well worth a visit.
Written March 16, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Simon H
Sydney82 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2019
Get your guide to agree with the tribe leader that you will pay a one off fee of approx 300-400 birr ( that's about 12-15 USD ) and with this fee you can then take as many photos as you like without having to pay each person. They still hassle you for money but nowhere near as aggressively. As for the tribe there are some lovely people here and you will get some great shots
Written September 25, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

shiraziwine
Shiraz, Iran1,549 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2019 • Couples
We arrived there after a long trip and crossing omo river, at the beginning we found them boring and not worth to visit but when it came to heart they made it the best. they tried to entertain us with kids group singing and at the end they made us a very big group dance of girls, it was amazing and memorable. i never forget them
Written May 17, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Eva L
Stockholm, Sweden37 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2018 • Family
You are taken over, for the fun of it, if you want by the local canoes - that is quite fun by your local guide. The Young boys that manoveur the canoes are very skilled.

THe cultur of the dasanech tribe is very interesting but the visit does have a bit of that chaotic and hectic vibe to it - where you are just seen as a moneybag and everyone (except the guide to be fair) just want your Money.

They women did a dance but it all has a sad tune to it - as it is so very much about just geting your Money and they do not really enjoy this. They are extremely poor and the atmosphere is not Always so relaxed.

When we were there there was also a lot of visitors and the atmosphere was a bit frentic.

It was very hard to really get any Contact with the local people.
Written March 3, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Finot-Tour-Ethiopia
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia126 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2015 • Friends
This is the most southerly of the tribes who live in Ethiopia’s Omo Valley. In this harsh world, there are times when members of the Dassanech tribe lose their cattle and goats, and with them their livelihood. The way they deal with this, by switching to an alternative means of support by the shores of Lake Turkana, is an example of how life has to adapt in fundamental ways in the face of some of the most inhospitable conditions in the world.
From Dassanech to Dies

Cattle are central to the lives of the Dassanech – just as they are for the other tribes of the Omo Valley. As well as meat, milk, leather for clothing, houses and mattresses, they provide status in the tribe, and the bride-wealth that allows a man to marry.

But unlike the lush green hills of the Suri and Hamar, the lands of the 20,000-strong Dassanech are semi-arid. They live where the Omo River delta enters Lake Turkana - their name means ‘People of the Delta’. Despite the lake and delta, this is an incredibly dry region: there is nothing but desert to the west and southwest, daytime temperatures hover round 35 degrees centigrade, and malarial mosquitoes add to the discomfort.

The Dassanech survive in this environment by cultivating crops when the rains arrive and the Omo river floods. They also manage their cattle herds well, slaughtering the older ones in the dry season, when grazing is limited, and the meat is most needed. But in this dry land, survival is precarious.

When Dassanech people lose their cattle to disease, drought or a raid by a neighbouring tribe, they are unable to sustain their usual way of life. Instead, they become the Dies, or ‘poor people’ and turn for their livelihood to Lake Turkana, where they fish and hunt crocodile and even occasionally hippopotamus.

The Dies’ place in Dassanech society is unique. As cattle are a central status symbol, and they have none, they are looked down on. On the one hand, they are considered members of the tribe yet economically, and to some extent culturally, they are set apart.

The different members of the tribe do, however, help each other. In times of need, Dies provide food for the Dassanech families as well, sharing crocodile meat and fish with the villages. The Dassanech, in turn, give the Dies meat from goats or cattle. Dies do have access to livestock if they really need it. For instance, a man still needs to exchange ‘bride-wealth’ with his wife’s family in order to marry. Most Dies have relatives with cattle, and as bride-wealth is repaid over long periods of time, the cattle can be drawn upon over months and years as new calves are born.

In good times, Dies can acquire livestock again and return to being herders, by exchanging goods for small stock and acquiring more and more livestock over time. Ideally, being Dies is only a temporary thing until they can return to ‘being’ Dassanech again. For some, a generation or more is needed to complete the transition back to cattle herding. But for others, the shift has become permanent. It also follows that in times of plenty, there are fewer Dies. As famine spreads, their numbers increase.

For those who have lost their cattle, there is another option. That is to cross tribal boundaries, which have always been fairly permeable, and join with another group where an individual might have a family connection.

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Dassanech Society

Within the village, it’s the women who build and take down the huts during migrations. They are semi-circular constructions with no interior divisions, made up of sticks and branches called miede. The first part of the hut to be constructed is the ‘store’ - actually a small box-like structure made from reeds and rope from cow skin. This also the box used for moving items on the donkey back. It is set by one side of the hut and used for storing tobacco, coffee and other important items.

These huts are well ventilated, as it is important to have airflow through in such a hot environment. There is only one entrance, a small opening that is closed by animal skin – that way it is extremely difficult for an enemy to go through the opening un-noticed. Inside the huts are a hearth, an area where animal skins are laid for sleeping on, and the store. Women also claim the right-hand side of the hut (and of the porch outside) as their own.
Written September 15, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

ColdCorona
Idaho329 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2018 • Business
Spent about two hours interacting and photographing this tribe. Somewhat unique use of local and acquired building materials to make home structures which can be moved as the tribes migrates to other feeding grounds for their animals. Nice jumping dance by tribal men as well as a small market area for purchase of tribal crafts.
Written December 17, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Patty6-13
Davis, CA520 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2018 • Couples
In Omorate we climbed in a dugout canoe to cross the Omo River for a tour of a Dasenech village. The children were so friendly, each wanting to hold our hands as we walked about the village. I ended up with 3-4 kids on each side holding onto a finger! We had 2 guides who live in the village. One took my camera and made so many more photos than I would have taken. These are a semi-nomadic people who move once a year to a village about 20 km away taking the dismantled huts & everything with them. We watched 3 women constructing a new hut while the chief slept nearby. A group of teens sang & danced for us. As I am an older traveller I always like to know the ages of the older women I meet. Most do not know their age. The tribal traditions live on but for how long no one knows. The building of dams along the Omo River will have an impact for sure. I so appreciate the opportunity to visit and learn from a people with great dignity.
Written March 21, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Dasenech Village - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (2024)

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