Mt. Fuji 5th Station
Mt. Fuji 5th Station
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  • Travelove58
    11,313 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Beautiful, majestic & icon of Japan.....a must see attraction
    This is probably the closest point that anyone can get to see the beautiful Mt Fuji & its surrounding landscapes, besides hiking. Mt Fuji is the famous, majestic & symbolic icon of Japan - a must see attraction esp when in Tokyo. Something that we have always wanted to see close but never done so in our many Japan trips, till now. As expected, the place is swarmed with bus loads of tourists, very crowded. The souvenir store was like a fish market.
    Visited May 2023
    Traveled as a couple
    Written May 11, 2023
  • bernadette316
    Southend-on-Sea, United Kingdom127 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Some practical tips for your Mount Fuji climb
    There are actually four 5th stations, one on each of the possible trails up Mount Fuji. We climbed the Fujinomiya trail which the shortest, but also the steepest, of the four trails. I struggled to find information about the trails and travel to/from them so here are some practical tips. There are limited shuttle bus services to and from the Fujinomiya fifth station, with the last one leaving at 7pm. We got a taxi there though and there are taxis turning up at intervals during the evening if, like us, you return to the 5th station after 7pm. So don’t panic! The maps given to us on arrival have estimated times to walk up/down between each station on the route. Maybe we are hugely unfit but it took us much longer. In particular they estimate that each stage of the descent takes only half the time as the equivalent stage on the way up. That explains us getting back so late. Some people choose to do a night hike and stop off at one of the huts for a few hours sleep, before seeing the sunrise but, only based on the last stages of our climb down in the dark, that would not be something I would choose. We set off at 8am and it took us more than 12 hours to get to the peak and back. An even earlier start would have been a good idea in retrospect! That said, it is an incredible experience so do give it a go! There’s a great spirit among the climbers, the stations all have shops and toilets although I’d suggest carrying your own snacks and water and just buying additional supplies as you go. The stations only take cash and at ¥200 to use the toilets, you’ll need to make sure you have lots of coins with you. The best hot meal options are served at the 9th station on this trail. Maybe a longer but less steep trail would have been a better option for us but even so it was a wonderful adventure, and I’m so glad we did it. Things to take with you: cash/coins, warm/wet weather clothing, snacks/drinks, head torch, camera/phone, a sense of adventure! Enjoy!!
    Visited August 2023
    Traveled with family
    Written August 22, 2023
  • PHLim_SG
    Singapore, Singapore119 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Summer's Surprise: Mount Fuji Unveiled from Unexpected Places
    Ah, what an exciting adventure we find ourselves on! It's that splendid time of the year, the warm embrace of summer, when Mount Fuji sheds its iconic white hat and basks in the golden rays of the sun. Imagine standing amidst nature's grandeur as Mount Fuji unveils its full, awe-inspiring glory. As you explore this remarkable place, don't forget to indulge in the delightful array of souvenirs that await you in the charming local shops. But here's the twist: the most breathtaking view of Mount Fuji can be found in a rather unexpected place - right in front of the public washrooms at the illustrious 5th station! It's a quirky discovery that adds a touch of whimsy to your visit. So, pack your sense of wonder and set off to witness Mount Fuji's summer spectacle. You'll return not only with cherished mementos but also a unique tale of panoramic views from a most unusual vantage point. Happy travels, my adventurous friend!
    Visited July 2023
    Traveled solo
    Written September 12, 2023
  • Jayati R
    Hartford, Connecticut83 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Mt. Fuji San
    MT. Fuji San is an utmost beautiful place to visit when visiting Japan. Lucky enough to see Mt. Fuji in a clear blue sky. The weather here is so unpredictable that one plan to go and see the Mountain comes back with utter disappointment due to being cloudy.
    Visited December 2023
    Traveled with family
    Written January 3, 2024
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Rodrigo S
Tokyo, Japan10 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2022
Even though the view was amazing, I had a terrible experience there.

As it is written in the picture, yesterday (Sunday, 28 August) I entered the facility to inquire about the shower service, as it had rained on my way back from Mount Fuji and I really needed a hot shower. The lady from the souvenir shop was kind enough to direct me to the showers, as the shop is quite big and it is not easy to spot them. Once I arrived there, an old guy at the reception of the Gogoen Rest House looked at me with a side eye without even greeting me. I then approached him to inquire about the showers, and without a second of hesitation he said “Closed”. I was taken aback by it, but I knew something was wrong, especially because it was 9:30AM and lots of hikers were coming back from Mount Fuji, so I was not the only one in need of a shower. I then went back to the lady from the souvenir shop, and told her what happened. She was surprised as well, and told “Showers open, not closed”, and called a clerk in the shop to help me out. This guy told me to follow him, confident that the showers were indeed open and running, and took me again to the Gogoen Rest House reception. Once there, he told the old man that I needed a shower, and looking at me with a nasty look he repeated “Closed”, without providing any valid reason. The clerk was clearly embarrassed by it, especially because there were other clients around witnessing such unprofessional behavior, and others (all Japanese…) were entering the showers as it was happening in front of my eyes. They discussed a bit about it, but I understood that the old guy was adamant about it. In that moment I understood, the showers were not closed, they were closed TO ME. 

The lady from the souvenir shop was so embarrassed that she apologised to me for the old man, so I am assuming it is not the first time something like that has happened there.


I have been living in Japan for months, and it never occurred to me that someone refused service in such direct and nasty way. I am assuming it is because I am a foreigner, because other than that I was just a regular customer coming back from a hike, just like all of the others.

It is such a shame that a site of world cultural heritage such Mount Fuji is being ruined by such an unprofessional individual.
Written August 29, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Elisabethmh
Oslo, Norway567 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2019
Mount Fuji, Fuji-San in Japaneese, is the great symbol of the Japaneese nation and one of the most photographed sights in the world. The mountain is 3776 m above sea level and has an important religious meaning for many Japaneese people. It is only possible to climb Mount Fuji in juli and august and the mountain attracts more than 15 million people every year. Between 200 and 300 000 climbs all the way to the top.

5th Station is situated 2300 m above sea level and is the most popular station for visitors and often the startbase for climbers before their ascent to Mount Fuji. Not only can you experience the great view of the mountain but you can also get a great view towards the Fuji Five Lakes and Hakone nationalpark from Komitake Shrine situated just behind the large shop at 5th Station. In the shop you can buy food, drinks, snacks and small oxygen bottles in a can!

I am so greatful for getting the chance to visit 5th Station as it has been my dream for a long time. While staying in Tokyo I can highly recommend a visit to 5th Station.
Written September 9, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Travelove58
11,313 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2023 • Couples
This is probably the closest point that anyone can get to see the beautiful Mt Fuji & its surrounding landscapes, besides hiking. Mt Fuji is the famous, majestic & symbolic icon of Japan - a must see attraction esp when in Tokyo. Something that we have always wanted to see close but never done so in our many Japan trips, till now. As expected, the place is swarmed with bus loads of tourists, very crowded. The souvenir store was like a fish market.
Written May 11, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

PHLim_SG
Singapore, Singapore119 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2023 • Solo
Ah, what an exciting adventure we find ourselves on! It's that splendid time of the year, the warm embrace of summer, when Mount Fuji sheds its iconic white hat and basks in the golden rays of the sun. Imagine standing amidst nature's grandeur as Mount Fuji unveils its full, awe-inspiring glory.

As you explore this remarkable place, don't forget to indulge in the delightful array of souvenirs that await you in the charming local shops. But here's the twist: the most breathtaking view of Mount Fuji can be found in a rather unexpected place - right in front of the public washrooms at the illustrious 5th station! It's a quirky discovery that adds a touch of whimsy to your visit.

So, pack your sense of wonder and set off to witness Mount Fuji's summer spectacle. You'll return not only with cherished mementos but also a unique tale of panoramic views from a most unusual vantage point. Happy travels, my adventurous friend!
Written September 12, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Jayati R
Hartford, CT83 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2023 • Family
MT. Fuji San is an utmost beautiful place to visit when visiting Japan. Lucky enough to see Mt. Fuji in a clear blue sky.
The weather here is so unpredictable that one plan to go and see the Mountain comes back with utter disappointment due to being cloudy.
Written January 4, 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

coloradotrigirl
190 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2015 • Family
Let me start by saying, I hiked this with my family which includes a 12 and 15 year old. We live at 7000 feet and hike often. Please adjust the advise base on your level of fitness and experience. Overall it will provide you with good tips not found in any other online review.
1. There are four trails to hike Fuji. They range in steepness and in length. There's a ton of information on the Internet on this so I won't elaborate further. The Yoshida trail was what we took as it was the one closest to our hotel in Lake Kawaguchiko. This also had the most stations which had food and water. There are no trash cans and you must bring your trash with you.
2. Hike during the day. We started at 5 am on the The Yoshida Trail which starts at the Fuji-Subaru Line 5th Station and leads to the summit from the north side of Mt. Fuji in Yamanashi Prefecture. We were done well before lunch. The 5th station was a zoo when we returned and so glad we hiked it in the morning, It was clear and very few people were on the trail. There were a ton of people beginning their ascent when we came down and couldn't imagine getting stuck in the crowd.
3. Take a taxi to the 5th station. To hike this early, you'll need a taxi to get there. We reserved the taxi the night before. Our hotel helped set this up and negotiated a better deal for us. It was expensive but worth every penny. The first bus leaves from the Kawaguchiko train station at 6:45 and takes an hour to get to the 5th station. The day was going to be clear and hot. We would have suffered greatly if we waited until 8am to climb. Take the taxi back to your hotel too. There are many in queue at the 5th station and it only took a half hour to get back to our hotel vs the hour bus ride.
4. Don't rest on one of the station benches without asking or buying something first. Seems simple but you're not always thinking about etiquette when you're tired and coming across a very welcoming bench!
5. The stations are well stocked. So there's no need to bring anything but a small tote to carry your trash. We purchased a banana, water and even a Red Bull at the 8th station ;). I'd highly recommend a Red Bull about that time in the climb again ;)
6. Buy a hiking stick. I know they look touristy but you can have a stamp burned into it at each station. My son wanted one but we thought they were a bit touristy. In hind sight, I wish he'd bought one. Each stamp is about 200 to 300 yen. Most Japanese peaks have their own stamp and you can continue to collect stamps.
7. There are several vendors at the top that sell small trinkets and goods. We bought pins for 700 yen which included a date stamp for free. I'd highly recommend this.
8. If you plan to stay overnight at a station, pick one of the last two stations. They looked nice and I am sure the views at night are just as spectacular! There was a festival in Lake Kawaguchiko on August 4 and 5th which shot off an hour long fireworks which would have been visible from the stations.
9. This is a sacred place for the Japanese. Stop and appreciate the rituals.
10. Going down sucks! There is no way to sugar coat this. There is a separate trail for the descent that is a few miles longer and at a consistent grade. We ran down and slipped on the loose gravel a few times. This is where good trail running shoes would have been helpful. We had high end running shoes and ruined them on the descent. The fine dust got everywhere and we had to empty our shoes and socks three times on the way down.
11. What to wear: we wore a sleeveless top, shorts and running shoes and all brought a long sleeve top for the last 1,000 meters. It helped with the sun as well as the cold. The only thing I would change is our shoe type and I'd bring a buff to shield my mouth during the descent. You will have the fine dust everywhere!!! It's best not to breathe it in!
12. Enjoy the hike and the Japanese. The Japanese were extremely friendly and hospitable! Everyone you pass will say hello or good morning...etc. Try to learn a few phrases in Japanese before you go. You will use them along the hike. Also, several asked to take our picture and wanted to chat. We enjoyed their company and took a few minutes out of time at the summit to answer their questions.

It was a great experience and worth every penny! I'd highly recommend this hike no matter your age or ability! (We saw kids as young as 6 climbing it!). Don't hold back because you think it's "hard". The only regret you'll have is that you didn't do it! Climb on!

Written August 9, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Andy22L
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia625 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2012 • Family
I visited Mt. Fuji 5th Station in early April this year. It was a pleasant 45 minute ascent by bus to the 5th Station as the road wasn't too winding. What I like most about this journey is that the landscape transforms into a beautiful winter wonderland with plenty of snow-covered alpine foliage!

The 5th Station occupies quite a large area and has parking bays, restaurants, souvenir shops, toilets and even a shrine. From here, one side of the gentle slope from the peak is visible and looks close enough to climb (although I haven't tried it yet!). There are some observation points which offer great views of the town/city below on a clear day.

If you are looking forward to playing with clean, white snow, I recommend that you walk further away from the common area where the buildings are located since the snow here gets trampled pretty often on a busy day. This recommended area would be on the right side where the buildings end. It's also much quieter here.

As with any mountainous area, the weather can be pretty unpredictable so dress warmly and bring along a windcheater. Also, be cautious when exploring as ice and snow can be very slippery.
Written September 25, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

SFBayAreaTrekker
San Francisco Bay Area (CA)565 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2016 • Couples
Can one get two peeks at Mt. Fuji during the same visit following typhoons? Generally no, and during our visit at the Fifth Station, the cloud covering was so dense you could barely make out Fuji-san's shoulders. But this was the closest we would get to Mt. Fuji without hiking to the summit, and being so close was just as inspiring.

The Fifth Station is the highest point a visitor can reach via motor vehicle. The Fifth Station is also often not open to vehicles as it is starting point for the adventurous who want to have a personal experience with Mt. Fuji and are hiking to her summit. When accessible to motor vehicles, tour buses have a better chance to reach this point than a private car.

You will find stores for limited supplies and souvenirs.
Written September 15, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Tim S
Cincinnati, Ohio, United States263 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2014 • Friends
Most of the guides and webpages you will find when researching Mt Fuji are geared towards the general population, not an endurance athlete such as runner, cyclist, or triathlete. I just completed a marathon this spring (3:18) and currently am near my peak training for a 70.3 half ironman so I can offer some advice for those who are in similar condition and looking to climb Mt Fuji.

When to climb? 1 day or 2?
I'm sure the sunrise at the top is amazing, but I chose to skip it for several reasons:
- Tons of people are climbing to see the sunrise and the path is narrow most of the time so passing is difficult. If you climb on the same schedule as all the other people (including people who need to take a rest every switchback) the climb will take a lot longer since you wont really be free to go at your own pace. The goal for Mt Fuji is completion, not how fast you can do it. It's fine if some people need to go slower, but I personally wanted to go my own pace and not get held up by slower people.
- Jet leg sucks and sleeping for just a few hours in one of thouse huts would make it even worse
- The Huts are not anything near a hotel, it's a relatively open area where they cram in a bunch of strangers on the floor to sleep next to eachother (some may be slightly nicer than this, but overall I still wouldn't want to sleep in one of these).
- Hiking in the dark seemed like it would be difficult and now that I've done it during the day I think it would be really hard to see where you're going and make sure you're headed on the correct trail. Also when hiking in the dark you would miss all the good views along the way (which there where plenty, some better than the view from the top since it was cloudy when we got there).
- The longer you're on the mountain, the more stuff you need to carry on your back (food, water, etc) which makes the climb that much more difficult.
- I didn't want this to take up my entire weekend
All that being said, traveling from Nagoya to Fuji, climbing the mountain, then traveling back all within the same day made for a very long and exhausting day. I'm glad we choose to do it this way, but I would only recommend it for people who are in very good shape (could run, bike, or other endurance type activity for several hours consistantly). Otherwise, you might get stuck on the mountain with the sun going down and not enough time to get back to your hotel.

Which Trail?
We decided on the Subashiri trail because it was one of the less popular trails. Less people on the trail allowed us to climb at our own pace pretty much the entire time. Also, it starts at a little lower elevation than the main trails (Yoshida and Fujinomia) so the beginning was below the tree line and had a little different scenery climbing through the forest for a little while. I think Gotemba is the same way. Another key point is this trail has a seperate section for going down. That section allowed you to go much faster on the way down since there weren't as many switch backs and the trail was mostly fine rocks, almost like sand. You could run at some points, which actually felt easier than walking, but most of the time was a motion similar to downhill skiing. Eventually this became pretty hard on my legs but it was worth it to be able to come down so quickly.

How long does it take?
5:30am - departed Nagoya downtown by car
9:00am - arrived and parked at the town of Gotemba. From here we needed to take the bus from the parking lot up to Subashiri 5th Station. During peak times they don't allow you to drive up to the 5th station yourself.
9:45am - Begin hike
3:15pm - Arrived at the summit. It took us 5.5hrs inclluding stops for water, pictures, and to allow some of the people i was with to catch up. We stopped often, at every station and most 1/2 stations and the stops were not short. I was with a few other people who weren't in quite as good shape so I climbed at my own pace and waited for them to catch up at each station. My actual cimbing time was under 3hrs. I think I could have gone straight through and not stopped at all, maybe 3.5hrs worst case if i was on my own. It is fairly risky to climb too quickly, I think people are more suseptable to altitude sickness if they climb too fast. So stopping more than you really need to is probably a good idea.
4:15pm - Begin descent down the mountain
6:00pm - Arrive at the subashiri 5th station. Going down was much faster and hardly ever stopped.
about 4 hrs to travel back to hotel in Nagoya.
It was starting to get dark by the time we reached the 5th station so any longer and it would have become somewhat dangerous or at least a much slower pace.

Difficulty?
It's difficult to compare this to a running race or triathlon, but I think it's close to the difficulty of a half marathon. It's nowhere near as hard as a full marathon so if you can run a full, you will have no problem finishing Fuji. There are a few aspects that make it difficult in different ways though. The constant stepping up and use of the quads is more similar to cycling than running so if you're stricktly a runner, you may have a more difficult time than someone with some biking experience. However, the climb is not exactly easy on your joints so a cyclist who doesn't run much may have an equally hard time. Either way, if you run and/or bike regularly and can go for 2-3hrs at a time, you should have no problem finishing the hike in similar timing as I did with all the stops included. Some of the other guys i was with don't run or bike and they just didn't have the lung capacity to go at a steady pace.
Note for a non-athlete who may be reading this and getting intimidated: Yes you should train at least a little bit for this hike, but I think most people (even those who aren't in good shape at all) are capable of climbing Fuji if spread out over a long enough period. Just plan for the typical 2 day hike like most people do.

What to wear/pack?
I started with running shorts and tech fabric T-shirt. Added a long sleave compression shirt around 7 station with gloves and hat, then running tights under my shorts at 8 station, then a jacket at 9 station. Periodically had to put on a rain poncho big enough to cover my bag too. Changed to dry socks at 9 station. Be aware the weather changes very quickly and without warning. Even at 8 station we experienced about 0deg C, 20MPH gusting winds and hard rain, then 20 minutes later was sunny and clear at 9 station.
I don't own hiking boots and I can't think of a shoe that’s more confortable, stable, agile, but still lightweight than my running shoes so I decided to wear them. I'm happy with my choice. The climb up was perfectly fine with running shoes. The specific trail for going down is made of very loose fine pebble almost like sand, so your feet will slide as the sandy surface gives way. It make for a quick descent, however the sand and pebbles would keep going over the height of my shoe and getting inside my shoes and socks. I found a good solution was to wrap plastic bags around my feet over my socks inside the shoe and tuck the top of the bag into my running tights so no sand could get it. This worked great until one of the bags ripped. So bring a few spares if you try this method. Even with hiking boots, i think you'll end up with a lot of sand inisde.
I packed a backpack with the clothes listed above, camera, plenty of food (about 10 energy bars, nuts, bananas), and about 2L of water (which was plenty for me, but others drank 3L). Pack as light as you can. Use a backpack with chest and waist buckle if you have one.

Hope this helps.
Written July 25, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

ToucanSam787
Houston, TX83 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2012 • Friends
1) Crowds! Unless you enjoy being stuck in a human traffic jam with 25,000 of your closest Japanese friends, don't climb it! Everyone wants to get to the top at sunrise, so everyone is at the same stage at the same time. Near to the top, the ascending path is covered from edge to edge with people, and here is how it goes: Take one step. Wait. Wait. Wait. Step. Wait. Wait. Wait. Step. Wait wait wait etc.... I'm not kidding.

2) Roughness of the DESCENDING trail. The ascending trail is somewhat rough but because you are moving at a snail's pace (see #1) for most of the ascent, it doesn't seem too bad; you have plenty of time to catch your breath and enjoy the view of the backside of the person ahead of you. Still, half the ascending trail is boulders, not a trail, so it often involves some scrambling over large boulders or waiting for the person in front of you to scramble up a boulder. The descending trail, on the other hand, is all slippery sliding volcanic scree, the kind where your foot sinks and slides about 12 inches on every step. The trails are completely exposed to the high altitude sun, the slope is steep, and there is NO WATER the entire way down. There are many huts on the way up, all of which sell water and snacks at exorbitant prices. There are a few huts on the way down, NONE of which sell anything. There is an SOS station on the way down, but they don't have water either. Actually they dont have anything at the SOS station, it's just a signboard with some safety information and a very unhelpful guy who theoretically could call for help,if you could convince him to care that you were dying. This is mountain safety at its worst.

3) Poor facilities for resting. There are mountain huts at the 7th level where we rested before making the final ascent. The problem is that the huts have many many beds but only a tiny sitting space. Basically, they have more people booked than what can fit in the sitting space. So when we arrived we were told to go lay down in the beds and wait to be called for our turn to eat. The sleeping area is a large slab with futons laid out close together, 15 beds to a section, each section is surrounded by curtains. No lighting in the dark, cutrained-off sleeping areas. When it's your turn to eat, you are called by staff and only then can get out to the sitting area as they serve you a meager meal of mostly rice. You get one small 6 oz cup of water free, if you want more you have to buy it at $5/bottle. Thats just an 8 oz bottle. After your meal you have to go back to your section and lay down. Because each section is enclosed by curtains, there is no air flow and the sections soon become a carbon dioxide box. One member of our group tried to go lay out in the fresh air and was hit on the shoulder and told "Go back!" finally, you have to pay 200 JPY (2.67 USD) to use the bathroom.

4) Price gouging. 500 JPY (~6.67 USD) for an 8 oz bottle of water. Our "guide" never told us about this, so we ended up buying every sip of water. Bring your own, and bring LOTS of it. This is high altitude and your body dehydrates quickly.

5) Time. It takes a good 2 days of your time, getting there, getting up and down, and getting back to the main train lines. If you only have a short time in japan, it's much wiser to use your time to enjoy the view of Mt Fuji from one of the beautiful lakes at the foot. I think Mt Fuji is best appreciated from a distance.

In spite of my unpleasant experience, I still give it 3 stars because it is, after all, a beautiful and sacred mountain. The view from the top is nice, but basically its just a view of the tops of the clouds. At sunrise you won't get much view of the land below. So don't do it just for the view.

PS - If you still go to climb it - and you want to be in the sunrise crowd - do yourself a favor and don't wait for sunrise at the top. Get to the top while it's still dark, have a nice hot meal at one of the restaurants, then immediately start heading down while it's still dark. You get the same sunrise view as the crowd at the top because the entire path down is exposed and open. You'll be doing yourself a favor to cover some of the distance down while it's still dark. Once the sun gets up in the sky, the radiation exposure is brutal on the descending path, no shade at all till the bottom.
Written November 24, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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