Red Flag Canal Scenic Resort

Red Flag Canal Scenic Resort, Linzhou: Tickets, Tours, Hours, Address, Red Flag Canal Scenic Resort Reviews: 4.5/5

Red Flag Canal Scenic Resort

Red Flag Canal Scenic Resort
4.5
9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Monday
9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Tuesday
9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Wednesday
9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Thursday
9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Friday
9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Saturday
9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Sunday
9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
What people are saying
David C
By David C
Hard Workers of China
Jun 2015
Today was quite a busy day! We were due to check out at 8.00, so had an extra half hour in bed, so we didn’t get up till 6.00 a.m. After breakfast, we checked out and met all the others outside. We were going to Anyang, Henan, on the way back home, but our 2 hosts, including the husband,Chao Zhe Guo, were coming with us for the first leg of the trip, as they wanted to show us a place of interest along the way. This place is called Red Flag Canal, about 2 hours drive away. Halfway, we stopped at a police station to use their toilet, which was clean enough, with tiled walls and floors, but the actual toilet consisted of 2 rectangular holes in the floor, with a drop of about 10 feet underneath. No ceramic basin or flush, just the holes where you deposited stuff down into the murky depths below. Fortunately, I only wanted a pee and had the place to myself, otherwise there was no privacy. Only the privy. We collected another local policeman, who was to show us where to go for the next tour. We arrived in a mountainous area, outside a cable car station. However, we weren’t destined to go up the easy way! Here is a brief description of the area, from Baidu.cn website, which is the Chinese version of Google:- “”The canal is close to the border of Hebei and Shanxi. It diverts water from the Zhang River (漳河) into a canal. The Zhang River flows from Shanxi and becomes the border between Hebei and Henan near to Handan. The dam is located near the corner of the three provinces. The canal winds around the side of a cliff, through 42 tunnels and along the side of the Taihang Mountains. The main canal is 71 kilometres long with many branches to distribute the water. The canal was initiated during the Great Leap Forward and was built in the 1960s and the main channel was completed in 1965. It was dug entirely by hand labour. The main canal is 71 kilometers long. Including the distribution branches, the irrigation system is claimed to have a total length of 1500 kilometers.[1](includes photo). It irrigates the fields of the Linzhou district.[“ The accomplishment of the Red Flag Canal irrigated 36,000 hectares of land and solved water supply difficulties to some 567,000 people. Wang Songcheng, a 68-year-old local who joined the construction project when he was young, said all the locals, including children, women and aged people, came to build the canal voluntarily because they yearned to change the situation of water shortage. The canal really changed the life of locals greatly, said Wang. "We used to rely on nature, but since the canal brought water, we can harvest more grains to live a better life." Apparently, there was a drought in the 1960’s and it was decided to build this canal by hand, as there were no mechanical tools available. Men, Women and children were all employed in the task, with women breaking rocks for steps and paving, while in some cases, the men were suspended by ropes, down the cliff face, to hack a canal along the side of the mountains, using only crowbars and chisels. At one place, they had to dig a tunnel and the young men of the area worked on it at night, after a days’ work in the fields. They didn’t even have spirit levels, to judge the slope required to channel the water down to the plains below, so used bowls of water to guess the level. In all, they channeled round 221 mountains, cut about 40 tunnels, with a total of 1500 kilometres in length, counting side channels, to send water to several different areas. It took 10 years, so I don’t know how the people waited that long for their water supply! In addition to the canal, they also built a path alongside and in places it was wide enough to take cars. There were dinghies with outboard motors used along the canal afterwards. No one was able to tell me how many people were involved in the project, but I guess several thousand. Having learnt all this, we found that we were to walk the whole way up to the top of the mountain, although I wasn’t told this at the beginning! We started walking up a hill, from the car park and up some steps, we found ourselves on a path, running alongside a pretty wide canal, with muddy water flowing along. We walked alongside this for about 15 minutes and came to a sort of station area, where we could use a toilet and there was a kiosk selling bottles of water and cold tea. Then we were led up some more steps amd all I could see were mountain paths, going upwards. This was OK for about 20 minutes, until we came to an overhang, where we had to duck our heads, as we walked below the cliffs. Apparently, this is where the workers slept, with the hard rock as their shelter and bedding area. Then we came to a sort of fissure or crevasse in the mountain and I could see steps leading up through this crack, only just wide enough to squeeze through. We were told this was the way up and we all had to step up sideways, in order to get through the sides of the rock, pressing against you. It took some time for people to work out how to get through, so the 15 of us took some time. All this in heat of about 32 degrees. When we finally emerged, there was a spiral staircase going up another section of the mountain, with the metal steps screwed to the rock face. At the top, we were met by another crevasse, involving further squeezing through the narrow gap, at the same time as ascending the steep steps hewn into the rock. My silk shirt was wringing with sweat by this time. When we came out of this, panting and sweating, we were then told we were less than halfway up and the whole journey would take about 1 1/2 hours. It was like running a marathon and I haven’t done as much exercise as this for at least 20 years. The next stage was almost as difficult, as we had to climb hundreds of steps, in sections of about 50 steps each. You get to the top of one lot, regain your breath and walk along a gentle incline for about 20 yards and then encounter another 50 steps going straight up. One difficult section had a rusty chain for a handrail and I pulled myself up with this, to save my legs a bit. When I got to the top, my hands were covered in rust. Wang Yi had the same problem and washed his hands in a muddy puddle, but I used some wet tissue provided by Ling. It was a nightmare going up and it seemed there was no end to all these steps and I was absolutely shattered, with legs like jelly, but even so, I was about the third to reach the top, out of our group of 15, all 10 years younger than me. At the top, there was a cable car station, but ominously, to the left of that, was a 400 metre suspension bridge, which could hold a maximum of 50 people at a time. We posed for some photos on this bridge, which started swaying as more people got on and I could see in the distance, another path at the end of this bridge, leading up another mountain-about the same length to walk as what we’d just achieved. I hoped and prayed we weren’t going up that one, but I was told we’d be taking the cable car. Su Bin and Li Cheng started across the bridge, but someone phoned them on their mobile and asked them to come back, as the rest of us didn’t want to hang around for 2 hours, waiting for them to return. There a sort of waiting area here, but with a small toilet and an area to sit and eat some food. But there were only pot noodles available and cold tea, which no-one bothered with. When Su Bin got back, we all marched to the cable car and relaxed as we took the trip back in about 60 seconds, instead of the 2 – 3 hours of toiling upwards. At the bottom, it was time for lunch, at a place just around the corner, so we set off, but again, we had to walk round several corners for about 25 minutes before reaching the restaurant. At least the meal was excellent and we took an electric bus back to the car park.

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The area

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David C
Bexhill-on-Sea, UK219 contributions
Hard Workers of China
Jun 2015 • Friends
Today was quite a busy day! We were due to check out at 8.00, so had an extra half hour in bed, so we didn’t get up till 6.00 a.m. After breakfast, we checked out and met all the others outside. We were going to Anyang, Henan, on the way back home, but our 2 hosts, including the husband,Chao Zhe Guo, were coming with us for the first leg of the trip, as they wanted to show us a place of interest along the way. This place is called Red Flag Canal, about 2 hours drive away. Halfway, we stopped at a police station to use their toilet, which was clean enough, with tiled walls and floors, but the actual toilet consisted of 2 rectangular holes in the floor, with a drop of about 10 feet underneath. No ceramic basin or flush, just the holes where you deposited stuff down into the murky depths below. Fortunately, I only wanted a pee and had the place to myself, otherwise there was no privacy. Only the privy.
We collected another local policeman, who was to show us where to go for the next tour.
We arrived in a mountainous area, outside a cable car station. However, we weren’t destined to go up the easy way! Here is a brief description of the area, from Baidu.cn website, which is the Chinese version of Google:-

“”The canal is close to the border of Hebei and Shanxi. It diverts water from the Zhang River (漳河) into a canal. The Zhang River flows from Shanxi and becomes the border between Hebei and Henan near to Handan. The dam is located near the corner of the three provinces. The canal winds around the side of a cliff, through 42 tunnels and along the side of the Taihang Mountains. The main canal is 71 kilometres long with many branches to distribute the water.
The canal was initiated during the Great Leap Forward and was built in the 1960s and the main channel was completed in 1965. It was dug entirely by hand labour. The main canal is 71 kilometers long. Including the distribution branches, the irrigation system is claimed to have a total length of 1500 kilometers.[1](includes photo).
It irrigates the fields of the Linzhou district.[“
The accomplishment of the Red Flag Canal irrigated 36,000 hectares of land and solved water supply difficulties to some 567,000 people.
Wang Songcheng, a 68-year-old local who joined the construction project when he was young, said all the locals, including children, women and aged people, came to build the canal voluntarily because they yearned to change the situation of water shortage.
The canal really changed the life of locals greatly, said Wang. "We used to rely on nature, but since the canal brought water, we can harvest more grains to live a better life."

Apparently, there was a drought in the 1960’s and it was decided to build this canal by hand, as there were no mechanical tools available. Men, Women and children were all employed in the task, with women breaking rocks for steps and paving, while in some cases, the men were suspended by ropes, down the cliff face, to hack a canal along the side of the mountains, using only crowbars and chisels.
At one place, they had to dig a tunnel and the young men of the area worked on it at night, after a days’ work in the fields. They didn’t even have spirit levels, to judge the slope required to channel the water down to the plains below, so used bowls of water to guess the level.
In all, they channeled round 221 mountains, cut about 40 tunnels, with a total of 1500 kilometres in length, counting side channels, to send water to several different areas.
It took 10 years, so I don’t know how the people waited that long for their water supply!
In addition to the canal, they also built a path alongside and in places it was wide enough to take cars. There were dinghies with outboard motors used along the canal afterwards. No one was able to tell me how many people were involved in the project, but I guess several thousand.

Having learnt all this, we found that we were to walk the whole way up to the top of the mountain, although I wasn’t told this at the beginning! We started walking up a hill, from the car park and up some steps, we found ourselves on a path, running alongside a pretty wide canal, with muddy water flowing along. We walked alongside this for about 15 minutes and came to a sort of station area, where we could use a toilet and there was a kiosk selling bottles of water and cold tea. Then we were led up some more steps amd all I could see were mountain paths, going upwards. This was OK for about 20 minutes, until we came to an overhang, where we had to duck our heads, as we walked below the cliffs. Apparently, this is where the workers slept, with the hard rock as their shelter and bedding area.
Then we came to a sort of fissure or crevasse in the mountain and I could see steps leading up through this crack, only just wide enough to squeeze through. We were told this was the way up and we all had to step up sideways, in order to get through the sides of the rock, pressing against you. It took some time for people to work out how to get through, so the 15 of us took some time. All this in heat of about 32 degrees.
When we finally emerged, there was a spiral staircase going up another section of the mountain, with the metal steps screwed to the rock face. At the top, we were met by another crevasse, involving further squeezing through the narrow gap, at the same time as ascending the steep steps hewn into the rock. My silk shirt was wringing with sweat by this time.

When we came out of this, panting and sweating, we were then told we were less than halfway up and the whole journey would take about 1 1/2 hours. It was like running a marathon and I haven’t done as much exercise as this for at least 20 years.

The next stage was almost as difficult, as we had to climb hundreds of steps, in sections of about 50 steps each. You get to the top of one lot, regain your breath and walk along a gentle incline for about 20 yards and then encounter another 50 steps going straight up. One difficult section had a rusty chain for a handrail and I pulled myself up with this, to save my legs a bit. When I got to the top, my hands were covered in rust. Wang Yi had the same problem and washed his hands in a muddy puddle, but I used some wet tissue provided by Ling.

It was a nightmare going up and it seemed there was no end to all these steps and I was absolutely shattered, with legs like jelly, but even so, I was about the third to reach the top, out of our group of 15, all 10 years younger than me.
At the top, there was a cable car station, but ominously, to the left of that, was a 400 metre suspension bridge, which could hold a maximum of 50 people at a time. We posed for some photos on this bridge, which started swaying as more people got on and I could see in the distance, another path at the end of this bridge, leading up another mountain-about the same length to walk as what we’d just achieved. I hoped and prayed we weren’t going up that one, but I was told we’d be taking the cable car.

Su Bin and Li Cheng started across the bridge, but someone phoned them on their mobile and asked them to come back, as the rest of us didn’t want to hang around for 2 hours, waiting for them to return. There a sort of waiting area here, but with a small toilet and an area to sit and eat some food. But there were only pot noodles available and cold tea, which no-one bothered with. When Su Bin got back, we all marched to the cable car and relaxed as we took the trip back in about 60 seconds, instead of the 2 – 3 hours of toiling upwards.
At the bottom, it was time for lunch, at a place just around the corner, so we set off, but again, we had to walk round several corners for about 25 minutes before reaching the restaurant.
At least the meal was excellent and we took an electric bus back to the car park.
Written June 14, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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Red Flag Canal Scenic Resort is open:
  • Sun - Sat 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM