Penglai Tianhou Palace

Penglai Tianhou Palace

Penglai Tianhou Palace
4
12:00 AM - 12:00 AM
Monday
12:00 AM - 12:00 AM
Tuesday
12:00 AM - 12:00 AM
Wednesday
12:00 AM - 12:00 AM
Thursday
12:00 AM - 12:00 AM
Friday
12:00 AM - 12:00 AM
Saturday
12:00 AM - 12:00 AM
Sunday
12:00 AM - 12:00 AM
What people are saying
David C
By David C
Strange Mirage Phenomena
Jul 2015
Wednesday 8th June 2015 My wife, Ling had booked us to go a on a 1 day trip, by bus, from Weihai to Penglai. The cost was 214 yuan each, but we later got a refund of 144 yuan, as my entry to the site was free, because I’m 70 and showed my passport to confirm. The trip was fare only and we hadn’t been informed about lunch arrangements and hadn’t taken much with us, except for some crisps, water and a couple of apricots. I think this is where the tour operators fell down, because the catering arrangements hadn’t been properly thought out, unless there was some kind of deal we didn’t know about. The journey was 2 hours long and the bus was air conditioned, which this time, I wasn’t comfortable with, as I had a slight cold and had to cover up my chest and throat. Just past Yantai, the main city, we had a stop for toilets and Ling bought a sesame bun. Some people got off at The local Aquarium, which is the biggest in China, but our ticket didn’t include this. We stayed on the bus and were first taken to a Daoist Temple for a half hour tour. There was a beggar with no legs outside, but no-one gave him anything, as far as I could see, or maybe people were too embarrassed to pay him any attention. A few years ago, Ling had been conned by a Daoist monk into giving a donation of 666 yuan (£66.00) to the temple, just to ensure good luck for her family. He’d originally asked for 999. So this time, Ling was cautious not to let us join in any ceremony that might draw us in, even not buying any incense sticks. Apart from the historical interest, there’ s also a financial implication to these tours, where they want you to spend money on other things, apart from the original package. Then we went to the main attraction, The Penglai Pavilion, where we confirmed I would be allowed free entry. Details of the site are below:- From Wiki:- ‘Penglai Water City or Water Fortress (Chinese: 水城; pinyin: Shuíchéng), a fortified harbor hidden from the sea, is one of China's oldest military ports, built in 1376 under the Ming Dynasty[1] and is a protected historical monument. It was "the harbor for the fleet of imperial war junks and town for the semi-imperial garrison." [2] The Water City is currently being rebuilt at a cost of 500 millionyuan (more than 60 million dollars). There is a plank walk along the cliffs nearby. Penglai was the first port on the Shandong peninsula that was opened to foreigners in the 19th century,[3] so it was the first placeChristian missions were established. Subsequently, it was overshadowed by the port of Yantai (Chefoo), 55 miles to the east.[3] Its scenery has earned the city fame as the fabled spot where the Eight Immortals set out floating over the ocean from the Red Cliffs (Dan Cliffs 丹崖) there. Because of this connection with the immortals, the Emperors Qin Shi Huang and Han Wu Di both came to Penglai looking for an elixir of immortality. The city is also famous for its mirages out at sea, which are frequent during May and June.’ Now regarding the tour arrangements, or non arrangements for lunch. Having passed through the entrance, it was approaching lunch time around 11.45 and it looked like a long walk to the actual pavilion, which we could see at the top of a cliff in the distance. Just as the party crossed a bridge over the river, leading to the cliffs, Ling noticed the entrance to a restaurant and she asked the guide if we could go there for food, but she said the party were going on, as the items of interest were up ahead, so we stuck with the party. However, by the time we passed through several temples, with amazingly brightly coloured statues of various gods and mythical figures, gates protected by huge fierce statues, ancient trees, courtyards and huge stone statues of Daoist gods, plus a few of Bhudda, we reached the top of the cliff, with amazing views across the Bohai and yellow sea. This was also the site of a garrison with ramparts looking out to sea, as a form of defence against pirates and invaders. Another item of interest, was the famous story (in China) about 8 immortals, who apparently went out to sea, to enter some form of Paradise, to become angels. This story, has been made almost believable, due to a local phenomena, whereby from time to time, you can see an image of an island on the horizon, which wasn’t there before. On a normal day, it is just open sea, but in certain conditions, an image or mirage appears and you can see a land, with hills, buildings, factory chimneys and even cars moving about. We went into a small building showing a video taken in 2005, where you could see crowds gathering to watch the image appear at sea, plus people were taking photos and recordings. It must be some kind of reflection of a real seaside place, because the factory chimneys are clear to see, plus buildings with windows and cars moving, but no-one has been able to explain how it occurs. A combination of light, heat from the sea causing a mirage, particles in the clouds creating the reflection in the clouds? Who knows? By this time, it was 1.00 pm and we were feeling hungry, but the only food on offer were a couple of stalls, serving pot noodles or ice cream. With no other choice, we settled for a pot noodle each, paying inflated prices of 15 yuan each, when the normal price is only about 5 yuan. When Ling complained about the cost they explained they have to carry everything up the cliffs etc, but Ling pointed out there are electric cars available, to bring people up and down the mountain, plus on the other side there are cable cars. Anyway, we settled for this, with a hard boiled egg, for an extra 7 yuan. On the way back, you had to follow the exit signs, leading through underground shops, of course selling souvenirs at high prices, but the annoying thing was, that we at last came to the restaurant area, which we’d seen before, with loads of different things to eat, with no customers and loads of empty seats. By this time of course we weren’t hungry, but annoyed that we couldn’t have had the choice of eating here in the first place.In my opinion, this is a bad oversight on the part of the tour company, denying customers a better choice of food, plus also denying the restaurants a chance of business. With a group of about 30 people turning up, this would be a welcome addition to any place serving food.

Suggest edits to improve what we show.
Improve this listing

4.0
12 reviews
Excellent
3
Very good
6
Average
3
Poor
0
Terrible
0

FRANK O
Belfast, UK143 contributions
Day Trip
Jun 2019 • Couples
Visited from Yantai and started off great, 5 hrs later and we made our way to this location....mostly uphill to this Palace and a few others
Written June 16, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

David C
Bexhill-on-Sea, UK219 contributions
Strange Mirage Phenomena
Jul 2015 • Couples
Wednesday 8th June 2015

My wife, Ling had booked us to go a on a 1 day trip, by bus, from Weihai to Penglai. The cost was 214 yuan each, but we later got a refund of 144 yuan, as my entry to the site was free, because I’m 70 and showed my passport to confirm.
The trip was fare only and we hadn’t been informed about lunch arrangements and hadn’t taken much with us, except for some crisps, water and a couple of apricots. I think this is where the tour operators fell down, because the catering arrangements hadn’t been properly thought out, unless there was some kind of deal we didn’t know about.
The journey was 2 hours long and the bus was air conditioned, which this time, I wasn’t comfortable with, as I had a slight cold and had to cover up my chest and throat. Just past Yantai, the main city, we had a stop for toilets and Ling bought a sesame bun.
Some people got off at The local Aquarium, which is the biggest in China, but our ticket didn’t include this. We stayed on the bus and were first taken to a Daoist Temple for a half hour tour. There was a beggar with no legs outside, but no-one gave him anything, as far as I could see, or maybe people were too embarrassed to pay him any attention.
A few years ago, Ling had been conned by a Daoist monk into giving a donation of 666 yuan (£66.00) to the temple, just to ensure good luck for her family. He’d originally asked for 999. So this time, Ling was cautious not to let us join in any ceremony that might draw us in, even not buying any incense sticks. Apart from the historical interest, there’ s also a financial implication to these tours, where they want you to spend money on other things, apart from the original package.
Then we went to the main attraction, The Penglai Pavilion, where we confirmed I would be allowed free entry. Details of the site are below:-

From Wiki:-
‘Penglai Water City or Water Fortress (Chinese: 水城; pinyin: Shuíchéng), a fortified harbor hidden from the sea, is one of China's oldest military ports, built in 1376 under the Ming Dynasty[1] and is a protected historical monument. It was "the harbor for the fleet of imperial war junks and town for the semi-imperial garrison." [2] The Water City is currently being rebuilt at a cost of 500 millionyuan (more than 60 million dollars). There is a plank walk along the cliffs nearby.
Penglai was the first port on the Shandong peninsula that was opened to foreigners in the 19th century,[3] so it was the first placeChristian missions were established. Subsequently, it was overshadowed by the port of Yantai (Chefoo), 55 miles to the east.[3] Its scenery has earned the city fame as the fabled spot where the Eight Immortals set out floating over the ocean from the Red Cliffs (Dan Cliffs 丹崖) there. Because of this connection with the immortals, the Emperors Qin Shi Huang and Han Wu Di both came to Penglai looking for an elixir of immortality.
The city is also famous for its mirages out at sea, which are frequent during May and June.’
Now regarding the tour arrangements, or non arrangements for lunch. Having passed through the entrance, it was approaching lunch time around 11.45 and it looked like a long walk to the actual pavilion, which we could see at the top of a cliff in the distance.
Just as the party crossed a bridge over the river, leading to the cliffs, Ling noticed the entrance to a restaurant and she asked the guide if we could go there for food, but she said the party were going on, as the items of interest were up ahead, so we stuck with the party.
However, by the time we passed through several temples, with amazingly brightly coloured statues of various gods and mythical figures, gates protected by huge fierce statues, ancient trees, courtyards and huge stone statues of Daoist gods, plus a few of Bhudda, we reached the top of the cliff, with amazing views across the Bohai and yellow sea. This was also the site of a garrison with ramparts looking out to sea, as a form of defence against pirates and invaders.
Another item of interest, was the famous story (in China) about 8 immortals, who apparently went out to sea, to enter some form of Paradise, to become angels. This story, has been made almost believable, due to a local phenomena, whereby from time to time, you can see an image of an island on the horizon, which wasn’t there before. On a normal day, it is just open sea, but in certain conditions, an image or mirage appears and you can see a land, with hills, buildings, factory chimneys and even cars moving about. We went into a small building showing a video taken in 2005, where you could see crowds gathering to watch the image appear at sea, plus people were taking photos and recordings. It must be some kind of reflection of a real seaside place, because the factory chimneys are clear to see, plus buildings with windows and cars moving, but no-one has been able to explain how it occurs. A combination of light, heat from the sea causing a mirage, particles in the clouds creating the reflection in the clouds? Who knows?
By this time, it was 1.00 pm and we were feeling hungry, but the only food on offer were a couple of stalls, serving pot noodles or ice cream. With no other choice, we settled for a pot noodle each, paying inflated prices of 15 yuan each, when the normal price is only about 5 yuan. When Ling complained about the cost they explained they have to carry everything up the cliffs etc, but Ling pointed out there are electric cars available, to bring people up and down the mountain, plus on the other side there are cable cars. Anyway, we settled for this, with a hard boiled egg, for an extra 7 yuan.
On the way back, you had to follow the exit signs, leading through underground shops, of course selling souvenirs at high prices, but the annoying thing was, that we at last came to the restaurant area, which we’d seen before, with loads of different things to eat, with no customers and loads of empty seats. By this time of course we weren’t hungry, but annoyed that we couldn’t have had the choice of eating here in the first place.In my opinion, this is a bad oversight on the part of the tour company, denying customers a better choice of food, plus also denying the restaurants a chance of business. With a group of about 30 people turning up, this would be a welcome addition to any place serving food.
Written July 8, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Anything missing or inaccurate?
Suggest edits to improve what we show.
Improve this listing
Frequently Asked Questions about Penglai Tianhou Palace

Penglai Tianhou Palace is open:
  • Sun - Sat 12:00 AM - 12:00 AM