We noticed that you're using an unsupported browser. The Tripadvisor website may not display properly.We support the following browsers:
Windows: Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome. Mac: Safari.

Nibutani Ainu Museum

46 Reviews
Sorry, there are no tours or activities available to book online for the date(s) you selected. Please choose a different date.

Nibutani Ainu Museum

46 Reviews
Sorry, there are no tours or activities available to book online for the date(s) you selected. Please choose a different date.
46Reviews2Q&A
Traveler rating
  • 22
  • 15
  • 9
  • 0
  • 0
Traveler type
Time of year
Language
Selected filters
  • Filter
  • English
Popular mentions
stephtravelwriter wrote a review Oct 2019
Ubud, Indonesia833 contributions164 helpful votes
+1
Such an interesting museum. Famous woodcarver works from the tourist gift shop in the very far car park with bear statue outside . Go and meet him. I loved seeing the kimonos made from natural fibre and all the motifs. Such a beautiful museum to honour the Ainu. I would suggest a plan to have 3 hrs here. Never knew about QR reader thing. Should have checked here before and read some reviews . Visit this place for sure.
Read more
Date of experience: October 2019
1 Helpful vote
Helpful
Share
tamura3d wrote a review Jun 2019
Novato, California105 contributions47 helpful votes
+1
For anyone with an interest in the Ainu culture of Northern Japan and the Kamchatka Peninsula you would be sorely disappointed as we were to discover the interim closure of the Poroto Koton Ainu Museum in Shiraoi, not scheduled to reopen until 2020. But notwithstanding there is a satisfying option. Not far away is the inland town of Biratoni where the Nibuani Ainu Cultural Museum is located and it is every resource you could imagine to access knowledge to the history, culture, crafts, and enduring legacy of this unique indigenous culture of Japan. It is, by any measure, a root which the modern Japanese culture has evolved. Having enough time to spend, you could browse the display exhibits, sit and watch a short documentary movie, walk in and about traditionally recreated Kotan shelters and working communal facilities. There are archives of recordings, carvings, and film footage of the Ainu when they lived before dissolving into the past. This is a wonderful excursion into a world that was primitive but masterful in many surprising ways as in the art of weaving. The bark of native trees were stripped in long sections, then boiled to soften the fibers into a yarn the could be woven into wearable and functional garments. There are a wealth of myths and tales that enrich the stories that lie beneath. The Ainu embrace the belief of being respectful of nature and exploiting her many resources. If all that isn’t enough, there is an adjacent museum devoted to the history and developing of the surrounding land which is part the water management system that included the damming of the Saru River and the designing of a recreation area that can be enjoyed for picnics, walking, or just viewing the water and surrounding forest and hills. It should be noted that the intrusion of the modern dam prompted the area to be designated an Important Cultural Landscape. Hard to go wrong spending time at this place and a great choice for children of all ages with classes available for small workshops and hands-on crafts demonstrations. At very least you’ll be enriched by the wealth of cultural riches that were created and continue to live on as a ghost culture of Japan’s past.
Read more
Date of experience: May 2019
3 Helpful votes
Helpful
Share
Evadne Cake wrote a review Nov 2018
Melbourne, Australia8 contributions4 helpful votes
Download a QR code scanner on your phone before you go (or, it takes about ten seconds if you do it on the spot like I did when I saw the sign on the front desk). There is free wifi so that you can scan and read descriptions as you go through (for Korean speakers and English - I think there was another but I've forgotten)! Very cool and very resourceful. I thoroughly enjoyed reading as I went through. I was greeted by friendly staff who were very helpful, even with a language barrier. Really beautifully presented artifacts and information, as well as modern carvings which were absolutely stunning. I am in awe of the level of craftmanship and creativity demonstrated throughout this exhibit as well as the other Ainu museum I visited in Nibutani. I highly recommend. It is well worth visiting Nibutani for a few days to have time to rest and and really appreciate the exhibits and shops right by the river. Also, wheelchair accessible, including a great accessible toilet.
Read more
Date of experience: November 2018
2 Helpful votes
Helpful
Share
paolocalvino wrote a review Aug 2018
Kyoto, Japan16 contributions14 helpful votes
Nibutani Ainu Culture Museum is a very good and modern museum. Helpful staff, English speaking. Some documentaries can be watched with English subtitles too.
Read more
Date of experience: August 2018
3 Helpful votes
Helpful
Share
Frank C wrote a review Aug 2018
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania87 contributions33 helpful votes
The best museum of Ainu culture in all of Hokkaido, the Nibutani Ainu Museum provides not only beautiful exhibits in a modern building but also a multi-media experience introducing many aspects of the native population of northern Japan. Nibutani is a bit off the beaten track, but this museum makes the trip worth it. Must-see for anyone interested in aboriginal cultures of the world.
Read more
Date of experience: June 2018
2 Helpful votes
Helpful
Share
Previous
12
Frequently Asked Questions about Nibutani Ainu Museum