Chuson-ji Konjiki-do
Chuson-ji Konjiki-do
4.5
8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Monday
8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Tuesday
8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Wednesday
8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Thursday
8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Friday
8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Saturday
8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Sunday
8:30 AM - 4:30 PM

Top ways to experience Chuson-ji Konjiki-do and nearby attractions

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.


4.5
223 reviews
Excellent
140
Very good
62
Average
19
Poor
2
Terrible
0

LVV
Sapporo, Japan15 contributions
Aug 2021 • Solo
The ticket (800 yen) gives you access to a small museum with some amazing artifacts on display. You don't often have the chance to see original art from the Heian period. Many of the statues and objects on display are 900 years old. It's amazing that these artifacts survived for so many centuries.

I was very impressed by the Konjikido as well. I recommend reading about it beforehand. It's really beautiful and hard to believe that it is really 900 years old. It's still in perfect condition.
Written August 1, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Chuzaa
Vancouver, Canada3,514 contributions
Apr 2017 • Couples
We walked up from the parking lot at the foot of the hill that had the Chuson-ji Temple complex. It took nearly a little more than 20 minutes through hundreds of giant Japanese cedar (sugi) trees.

After seeing the main building of the Chuson-ji Temple, we walked further for about five minutes to get to the Konjiki-do Hall (Golden Hall). The admission was JPY800 per person for the Golden Hall and the Treasure House (Sanko-zo).

The Golden Hal of the Chuson-ji Temple is a small (5.5 meters x 5.5 meters), but marvelous example of Northern Fujiwara clan’s spiritual and cultural achievement in the late Heian Period (794-1185). The building was completed in 1124 by the first lord Kiyohira. This small wooden prayer hall with the main deity of Amida (Amitābha) and many Buddhist figures is painted with Japanese lacquer (urushi) and entirely covered with gold leaf, except for the wooden shingles for the roof. The hall is also the mausoleum for the key Northern Fujiwara family members (Kiyohira, Motohira, Hidehira and Yasuhira). Though it’s been nearly nine hundred years since the completion, much of the gold leaf is still there and it is easy to imagine the original glory of the Golden Hall.

The fragile structure is kept in the air conditioned concrete building (built in 1965) and we can see the Golden Hall only through the glass wall. No photography is allowed here. They consider that the Golden Hall had been left outdoor only for a short while after its completion and then covered by a simple sheltering structure over it. In 1288 during the Kamakura Period (1185-1333), a permanent sheltering hall was built to cover the entire original building. This Kamakura Period building is seen about 100 meters away from the Golden Hall. As it is also a unique wooden structure, it is designated as an Important Cultural Property.

It is highly recommended to also visit the Sanko-zo Treasure House which is where the reception is located after visiting the Golden Hall. It shows many original Buddhist images that were initially kept at various prayer halls within the Chuson-ji Temple complex and various artifacts. One of the most interesting pieces shown here is a Buddhist scripture written in gold and silver ink.
Written May 31, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Vadim
Murmansk, Russia26,735 contributions
Jul 2018 • Family
The principles of determining the criteria for attribution to the National heritage of Japan don`t coincide with UNESCO, nor even more so with the priorities of foreign tourists. There were no foreigners except us. No one prevented the Japanese from getting acquainted with the national treasure number 1. However, the Japanese were also not very much. The National Treasure of Konjiki-do, or the Golden Hal was constructed in 1124 (Heian era) by Kiyohira Fujiwara. The 5.5 meter square Buddhist altar with four pillars is coated with black lacquer plated with gold leaf. Konjikidô is dedicated to Amida Nyorai (the Buddha of Infinite Light). The building serves as a mausoleum containing the mummified remains of the leaders of the Northern Fujiwara clan: Kiyohira, Motohira and Hidehira, and the latter's son, Yasuhira. It is the only example in the world of four generations preserved together.
Written May 7, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Daniel Yong
Singapore, Singapore718 contributions
Jun 2018
So spectacularly golden and ancient and another building was built to protect its structure. The aura is strong with this one. Must come by since it is the only surviving temple
Written June 8, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

John
Leavenworth, KS1,300 contributions
Nov 2018
The Konjiki, or Golden Hall, is where the bodies of four generations of the Fujiwara are enshrined. It is such an important national treasure that a larger modern structure was built around the Konjiki to protect it from the elements.
Basho wrote a haiku, "Have the summer rains come and gone, sparing the Hall of Light" to commemorate his visit during his travels in Michinoku. From his haiku, we can see that many people were concerned with the effects of weather on the shrine. If you see nothing else during your visit to Chuson-ji, make sure you see this. There are audiotapes in several languages to help understand the significance of the shrine and the Fujiwara clan.
Written October 31, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Martin H
Hong Kong, China858 contributions
May 2019 • Friends
Well worth a visit if you're in the area. The visit to the museum was a good precursor but the Golden Hall itself is the highlight at the Chuson-ji Temple. The fact that this was completed nearly 1,200 years ago is remarkable.The gold leaf and lacquer work is outstanding.

The grounds at the temple are also worth exploring.
Written May 22, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
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Chuson-ji Konjiki-do - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (with Photos)