Palazzo di Bonifacio VIII

Palazzo di Bonifacio VIII, Anagni: Hours, Address, Palazzo di Bonifacio VIII Reviews: 4/5

Palazzo di Bonifacio VIII
4
Historic Sites • Points of Interest & Landmarks • Religious Sites
9:30 AM - 1:00 PM, 3:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Monday
9:30 AM - 1:00 PM
3:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Tuesday
9:30 AM - 1:00 PM
3:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Wednesday
9:30 AM - 1:00 PM
3:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Thursday
9:30 AM - 1:00 PM
3:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Friday
9:30 AM - 1:00 PM
3:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Saturday
9:30 AM - 1:00 PM
3:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Sunday
9:30 AM - 1:00 PM
3:00 PM - 7:00 PM
About
Anagni, known as the City of the Popes, gave birth to four popes and has long been the papal residence. In the historical center, full of elegant and austere buildings, Romanesque churches, steeples, loggias and piazzas, architecturally sober and basic, stands the Bonifacio VIII Palace, location of memorable events during the European Middle Ages. Public can visit the palace every day with a 5€ ticket and audioguide included (five languages available). In 1296, Philip IV taxed the French clergy, forbade the export of money, gold and silver outside the kingdom, claimed the right to judge the French clergy and repeatedly disobeyed to all the rebukes of Bonifacio VIII. Philip believed he have to be accountable only to God and judged Bonifacio VIII as an unworthy Pope. After he risked to be excommunicated several times, he sent Guglielmo of Nogaret in Italy in ordero to organize the party opposed to Bonifacio VIII, and to made the Pope judged by a general council. Bonifacio was ready to excommunicate the king, but he did not have time: on 7th September of 1303 over thousand mercenaries men led by Giacomo Sciarra Colonna reached him in Anagni. The enemies entered the doors already open by traitors of the pope, including the greatniece of the other Anagni Pope Gregorio IX. The attackers shouted: “Long live the King of France, die Pope Boniface!”. The negotiations began, Sciarra demanded the surrender and resign from the papacy and the pope refused. Bonifacio was willing to martyrdom and replied to Sciarra’s fury by saying: “E le col e le cape! Nosco primogenitum Sathane”” Here is the neck, here is the head! I acknowledge Satan first-born. ” And on this occasion the story tells that Sciarra Colonna slapped the Pope Bonifacio VIII.
Suggested duration
< 1 hour
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The area
Address
Best nearby
Restaurants
67 within 3 miles
Attractions
40 within 6 miles

4.0
222 reviews
Excellent
82
Very good
99
Average
30
Poor
7
Terrible
4

Bon viveur
London, UK1,470 contributions
May 2019 • Friends
This ancient palace is steeped in fascinating papal history. We found the audio guide to be a pretty good introduction to the stories and the stones exuded a dramatic sense of intrigue.
It’s not very large, but you will need at least an hour. I recommend reading about the infamous ‘slap’ before you visit in order to really appreciate the significance of the site.
Written May 29, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Karen D
Sperlonga, Italy78 contributions
Jun 2018 • Couples
Well laid out, cool rooms, excellent audio guides. Fascinating history. A short walk from the Duomo so easy to fit both into one day
Written June 30, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Alessandro A
Rome, Italy243 contributions
Jun 2018 • Couples
Anagni town offer the view of several building of interest. Bonifacio VIII building is one of these. Made in large pieces of local stones is constituted by 3 large rooms with wall decorated by original painting. Particular attention worth the goose painting were are painted hunting birds were is possible to recognise 12 different species.
Written June 10, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Alex F
Siena, Italy238 contributions
May 2017 • Business
Fascinating castle in the centre of Anagni, witness of an historical (or legendary) episode between the most powerful institutions of the Medieval time: the Pope and the Emperor. Original and contemporary art meet up here.
Written May 27, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

RaphaelTobias
Herefordshire, UK91 contributions
Sep 2016 • Friends
Quite an exceptional and unexpected building with breathtaking views. Be sure not to miss the wall of geese. Wonderful collection of photographs and maps.
Written September 18, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

GuildfordLilly
United Kingdom183 contributions
Sep 2016 • Couples
3 Euros for entry but well worth it, it is full of interesting things and facts, the literature given is also very informative
Written September 14, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

tcasabella
Barcelona, Spain5 contributions
May 2016 • Couples
I must say this is the 1st time I have seen a statue of a pope put up on the fachade of a cathedral in his home town . Ordered it himself and was accused of idolatry by political opponents . Of course this were the Middle Ages when popes were feudal lord of all the land around rome and big part of Central Italy .However after seeing the mercenary nature of Anagni Cathedral I fully understand the men of French King Philip the Beau and a Roman nobleman ( in the middle of wars between kings and popes about power in Italy ) when in public they slapped Pope Bonifacius the 8th , wearing his papal ornaments , soundly on his face after entering Anagni . Well done , Sciarra Colonna ! ( That was the nobleman´s name .
Written May 22, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

ManiagoRina
maniago139 contributions
May 2014 • Friends
you can see a lot of the countryside from the top and then of course the long walk down, we also saw the museo of Bonafacio which had some Etruscan artifacts
Written June 3, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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Frequently Asked Questions about Palazzo di Bonifacio VIII

Palazzo di Bonifacio VIII is open:
  • Sun - Sat 9:30 AM - 1:00 PM
  • Sun - Sat 3:00 PM - 7:00 PM