Tirrenia Ferries
Tirrenia Ferries
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Neighborhood: Porto
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  • Fairycakes
    69 contributions
    1.0 of 5 bubbles
    Terrible food, dirty ferry
    Took the ferry from Naples to Palermo. Having read reviews of Napoli port we arrived early so we weren't rushing to find the right place. We asked in the ticket office and the staff wrote the name of the boat down for us,after that it was very obvious where we needed to go. The ferry was very dated and dirty. We got a seat in the lounge but the carpet was filthy, obviously not being cleaned between crossings. The toilets were all disgusting and I would advise you being toilet roll as this was lacking. The self service restaurant was an absolute disgrace. It was extremely expensive and very poor quality. Having been in Naples for a while and eating amazing sea food with wine very cheaply we were very disappointed. For my husband and myself and two kids, we both had pasta, kids plain chips and soft drinks it was the most expensive meal we have had on holiday and the worst. We are used to travelling to France from the UK and having entertainment, really decent food for fair prices and relatively clean ferries so this was a bit of an eye opener. Around us all the Italian people had brought cool boxes and were eating and drinking what they had brought onto the ferry. On our return journey we made a big picnic and brought a bottle of wine for good measure, that was much more enjoyable than being ripped off for food. There isn't a lot of choice for Ferries to Sicily, the other providers having equally bad reviews. Just make sure you bring your own food and snacks and drinks so you aren't being ripped off on-board. Oh and toilet paper...definitely bring that!
    Visited August 2023
    Traveled with family
    Written August 29, 2023
  • World Lifetime J
    1 contribution
    1.0 of 5 bubbles
    Terrible experience with Tirrania Ferries
    I wish I had read the bad reviews before booking. Indeed the negative feedback from all other people is true. The route we have been on is Porto Torres (Sardinia) to Genoa. To keep it short please read below pros and cons: Pros: Beautiful outside facade. Decent cabins Cons: Dirty windows, dated boat. Very old bathroom in the cabin. Dirty public toilets. Embarkation process slow Delay on arrival of almost 2 hours (we were supposed to arrive at 07.30 in the morning as per the booking itinerary and of course I made plans based on this arrival time. However, when checking-in I just asked about the arrival time to be told that the boat only arrives in Genoa port at 08.30 instead of 07.30. Then guess what? We only arrived about 08.45 and the passengers were only allowed to get to their cars at this point, after which it took about 40-50 minutes extra to disembark the boat because of a totally chaotic organisation. In the end we got out from the port almost at 10am with the traffic) Extremely slow disembarkation Not very polite staff In conclusion, think three times before booking with Tirrenia Ferries. I hope my review helps future travellers make the right decision. Not recommended at all. As for me, I will never use Tirrenia Ferries unless that will be the only solution to go for...Good luck.
    Visited August 2023
    Traveled with family
    Written September 6, 2023
  • Oksana Thom
    3 contributions
    2.0 of 5 bubbles
    Rude Staff
    The onboarding process was good, outside cabin for 4 is ok. The positive feedback stops there. Reception guys are rude, A La Carte restaurant service is very rude and condescending. What is wrong with a staff here?? Luck of training? Low salaries?
    Visited October 2023
    Traveled with family
    Written October 7, 2023
These reviews are the subjective opinion of Tripadvisor members and not of TripAdvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

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2.0 of 5 bubbles648 reviews
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DCL
Los Angeles, CA24 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2022
Reviewing this hellish trip feels like shouting into a void. No one will read this and the same travelers will book this ferry because it’s the only game in town if you’re local. You’ve got to respect that. BUT for vacationing travelers privileged enough to have options, this should never even be a last resort. Ever.
At Civitavecchia Port outside of Rome, I searched in vain for signs of this ferry. I finally lined up at the only place I saw people gathering. The ticket collector yelled at me to go to the "other entrance." I searched for said entrance for over an hour, finally enlisting the help of a kindly port shuttle driver. There was no specific entrance for non-drivers, so I trudged past the cars that had driven onto the ferry. I found my room and was intensely repulsed: bathroom toilet and sink were so dirty I was shocked. Exhausted, I just lay on the bed. Wifi, even when purchased, was spotty at best. When I ascended to the lounge area, I ordered a drink and nearly sat down on a sleeping passenger stretched out across the chairs. In fact, every square inch of lounge seating area had been taken over by sleeping travelers. It looked like a carpeted morgue. At the very least, I felt ripped off: what was the point of the more expensive cabin anyway? The food was inedible and the drink was watery. The whole ordeal suddenly devolved into an endurance contest as I prayed for arrival. One hour before arrival we were herded out of our cabins and forced to find a square inch of deck or lounge area to wait. I stood outside on one of the decks and enjoyed the Olbia sunrise. Once we arrived, it was total chaos: where to go? how to exit? Not even the regular commuters seemed to know. We all stumbled around. Finally I disembarked and kissed the ground. If you fetishize suffering, take this ferry. If not, find another option. Swim if necessary.
Written July 5, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

World Lifetime J
1 contribution
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2023 • Family
I wish I had read the bad reviews before booking. Indeed the negative feedback from all other people is true. The route we have been on is Porto Torres (Sardinia) to Genoa. To keep it short please read below pros and cons:

Pros:
Beautiful outside facade.
Decent cabins

Cons: Dirty windows, dated boat.
Very old bathroom in the cabin.
Dirty public toilets.
Embarkation process slow
Delay on arrival of almost 2 hours (we were supposed to arrive at 07.30 in the morning as per the booking itinerary and of course I made plans based on this arrival time. However, when checking-in I just asked about the arrival time to be told that the boat only arrives in Genoa port at 08.30 instead of 07.30. Then guess what? We only arrived about 08.45 and the passengers were only allowed to get to their cars at this point, after which it took about 40-50 minutes extra to disembark the boat because of a totally chaotic organisation. In the end we got out from the port almost at 10am with the traffic)
Extremely slow disembarkation
Not very polite staff

In conclusion, think three times before booking with Tirrenia Ferries. I hope my review helps future travellers make the right decision. Not recommended at all. As for me, I will never use Tirrenia Ferries unless that will be the only solution to go for...Good luck.
Written September 6, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Oksana Thom
3 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2023 • Family
The onboarding process was good, outside cabin for 4 is ok. The positive feedback stops there. Reception guys are rude, A La Carte restaurant service is very rude and condescending. What is wrong with a staff here?? Luck of training? Low salaries?
Written October 7, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Harald Diver
Sipoo, Finland112 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2022 • Couples
There was a time, some hundred years ago, when people suffered, even died on their sea voyages, having forced to bring their own food and water. Well, you can get close to this historical feeling by traveling with Tirrenia. I don't want to raise my blood pressure continuing, please read the other reviews.
Written April 3, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Frincham
World2 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2021
On the 10.5 hour overnight ferry from Sardinia to Genoa there are not enough cabins for all of the passengers. If you miss the cabins, an alternative option is to book a seat. The seats look plush in the images and they lean right back. I paid to reserve one.

It is best to arrive at the port early. Italian ports operate with almost no signage and queues of traffic with undefined endpoints merge, bifurcate, and intersect at random. At the smaller ports these queues mix with the traffic of the town in which the port is situated. At any given time you have no idea whether you are queuing for the supermarket car park or a ferry.

The Italians have a sense outsiders lack which tells them which queue to join and when it is possible to pull out of the queue, drive past it and pull back in at the correct location in the far distance. Presumably this sense is why the only signs you see are: 'PORTO', with helpful arrows pointing in the direction of the sea.

After boarding, we saw there were seat numbers on the ticket, but we hadn't selected a seat when booking, "Do we need to sit here?" I said, pointing at the number on the ticket.

"No, no, seats are free. Sit anywhere." said the receptionist.

We arrived at the seating area, set up like a large aeroplane with rows of seats in three columns. It was a room full of people who all wanted the best possible seat for themselves, all holding tickets that have seat numbers.

Many people had not noticed the tiny number on the ticket. Some had noticed and assumed that they need to sit where the number says. These people were German or Dutch. People with bad seats were ignoring the numbers or they had learnt from reception that the seat number on their ticket has no bearing on the seat that they are allowed to sit in. The people with good seat numbers stuck to the reasonable logic of "I have a ticket with this seat number on it. You do not. You need to move." The crew who could have acted as peacemakers were nowhere to be seen.

In the seating confusion we secured seats in the front row of one of the sections and placed our yoga mats and towels in front of us. On the five hour journey to Sardinia we had seen people sitting happily on yoga mats and towels. This time we'd brought ours. We were in the know.

We were glad to have this option. The seats are nothing like the pillowed cloud of an armchair that was advertised. They are dense and covered in shiny plastic. They do lean back, but almost imperceptibly.

The long night begins.

Two hours in this chair and you finally surrender to the nagging thought which arose the moment you sat down, "I cannot sleep here." An ache has spread through your body. You have tried every contortion that your flexibility allows. You know the only reason you stayed this long is because you paid for it.

So many people are walking in and out of the seating area that you cannot sleep in front of the chair without being stepped on. Some of your neighbours' frames are very well cladded. The man at the end looks like he has bladder issues. You need to move.

You wander through the now fully loaded ship. Every dark corner and padded sofa is taken. You lament that had you left the seat earlier one of those spots could have been yours. Staying put you have also missed an interesting transformation, the ship is now carpeted with air mattresses.

It cannot be that hundreds of people sleep on air mattresses on their holidays. These people must take air mattresses on holiday just for the ship. Some of these mattresses fit so perfectly into the darkened alcoves that you wonder whether they were made for them. Is an entire niche of the air mattress market focused on these ships?

The yoga mat that you smugly brought on board now singles you out as an overnight ferry amateur.

The crew do not seem to think eight air mattresses by the stairs are a safety hazard. You wonder if watching Jack and Rose battle past air mattresses as water poured into the passageways would have made the Titanic a better film.

You find a play area. A huge carpeted room, most of it empty space for children to run. There is a climbing gym with netted rope gangways spanning gaps between platforms. Until now you never realised that they look just like hammocks. The multiple levels of the platforms are all gloriously padded. And all of them are already full. Maybe the ball pit is-? No, after shining a light into the multicoloured balls and looking closer, hands, feet, and some patches that must be denim are visible. No room.

On an overnight Italian ferry you will learn that there are types of air mattress that you did not know existed. Some air mattresses in this play area are so large that they are indistinguishable from beds. People are a meter above the ground on king size air mattresses. They have pillows, duvets, and eye masks. Some have bedside tables with lamps on. It is surreal.

As you look at the flotilla of mattresses in the room, the thinness of the yoga mat rolled under your arm pounds at your sanity. All of the darker areas are taken, you roll out your mat under one of the room's many spotlights. You look jealously at the mattresses and tents around you. The tents probably have mattresses in them too, you think.

Everyone in the room is trying to sleep except one group who are sitting outside their tent on camping chairs. They have bottles of beer in the armrests and they cheers them often. Clink! Clink! Clink! They are mainly talking quietly. Except one woman whose high pitched, excited voice cuts across the room. She chatters endlessly.

The air in the room is stale and musty. You can feel the fumes of the ship's engine. Spaced around you people are snoring. Deep, throat shredding snores. KKKKKrrrrrckkk-Ukk. Some of the mattress people have no sheets and their naked skin squeaks loudly against the plastic every time they move. They move a lot.

At 1am a brave woman near you has had enough. She is a fellow yoga mat sufferer. She stands up and walks over to the campsite. The tent vibrates violently and bulges as a beast inside barks madly and lunges at her. She jumps backwards before regaining courage, "Can you please be quiet?" she says. You can't tell whether the campsite can hear her over the furious, snarling animal. The entire room is awake again. You have disturbed the peace the room thinks looking at her and the shaking, barking tent. You think it is not fair that she gets the blame. She walks quickly back to her mat. The chattering woman is quieter after that and allows other miseries a chance to torment you.

The snoring, the skin squeaking, the fumes, the numbness in your hip, the rocking floor, they form a mind splitting symphony. You feel smothered and sick. There is a rasping heat crouched in your sternum, threatening you.

The anger you feel at your self-inflicted, cabinless situation is stopping you feeling tired. You try to breathe deeply and calm down. The fumes and musty carpet dive deep into your chest and hook the hot bile in your sternum and start to drag it upwards. You revert to quick shallow breaths.

You see a large dog across the room and learn that dogs can look seasick. He is motionless. Trying not to move lest he throws up. He knows his owners are furious at him whenever he throws up. His eyes are wide open and wretched. They look into yours and recognise the kinship that you are feeling.

You unfold yourself creakily. There must be some place better to sleep on this ship of the damned.

You walk down timeless, brightly lit hallways with fake marble floors. People are laying down on every surface. They have twisted themselves to fit onto S-shaped benches. One is laying across the info desk with her head on the phone. Two women have fallen asleep crammed into the mickey mouse kids' ride in the arcade. You think about putting a coin in to set it off. There is a room with televisions running soundlessly. People group loosely around them them like forgotten souls around a chink of light. They watch vacantly.

You go up to the upper deck and step out into the wind and see the dark expanse of sea. A few maniacs are on the deck, curled in sleeping bags behind bulky masses that provide slight protection from the wind. You see a room with dark eyes looking out from behind bars, locks are slid over the doors. It is a kennel. You peer in hopefully, but the cages are far too short for you and so you move on.

You go back to the room with the chairs where you began. As you enter a cinema of faces look back at you. Frozen upright in their chairs with rigor mortis setting in, they appear terrified. They grimace in the sunk costs crisis they have fallen into. You turn around. It is not something you want to see.

You go back to your mat and lay down.

There are flashes outside the window. At first you think it's a light on the ship, but it is lightning. It becomes more frequent and gets closer and the ship begins to rock. You thought that the ship was rocking before but it wasn't. It was barely moving. Now it swings.

As the boat rolls the people around you become an orchestra of torturous pendulums. RRRRrrrrpppp. RRRRrrrrppppp. That skin rubbing symphony ripples out with each sway of the ship. The snorers have not stopped snoring, but their snores now change pitch with the rolls of their bodies. You glance at the dog. He blinks slowly at you.

Laying there, not sleeping, with your stomach gyrating around its acid, the acid becomes the center of you. The acid is the air bubble of the spirit level that is you. It becomes your existence and engulfs you. Seasickness has become something you cannot help but vocalise with prehistoric groans.

Some time that you did not notice the ship stopped swinging. It is calmer now. You find yourself curled in a tight ball and unfurl tentatively. You feel tired. Maybe you can sleep. Someone begins unzipping bags. Infinite zips on infinite bags.

You roll over onto your back. You never realised how much your insignificant mass was able to crush you into the ground. Beached whales and tranquilised rhinos are added to seasick dogs as creatures that you now have something in common with. The area of skin that you hadn't noticed move off your thin yoga mat onto the carpet has a rash. Unfathomably a neighbour in one of the tents decides to open and noisily eat a large bag of chips.

The high-frequency ripping sound of the immense friction forces between skin and plastic mattress wakes you again.

A dog is walked too close to another and they erupt in barks and yaps. The too late, panicked hushes of the owners have no effect on the dogs. The room awakens and rumbles with a plastic mattress thunderstorm. The owners must know there is a kennel.

You almost fall asleep when you hear someone say your name. You pull the t-shirt off your face. The person that said your name was just a pair of flip-flops moving past. Flip-flops carrying one of the one thousand bladders in this godforsaken playpen to the toilet. Those feet will soon be back as the crew has locked almost every single toilet, leaving just a few secluded bathrooms open. Every trip to the toilet is forced to criss-cross the entire ship in an increasingly panicked tempo. It occurs to you that wearing flip-flops to walk through a room of sleeping people is incredibly rude.

At 7 A.M. the tannoy wakes you, announcing that you need to get up as the ship is beginning its docking operations. In the only just brighter light of day you see that you have slept near a pillar that has a microfilm of rusty liquid running down it to the carpet below. Civilisations of moss and mould have reached advanced stages at its bottom. You cough and think your throat feels strange.

A couple on a king size meter thick air mattress backed snugly into a dark alcove sit up. Removing their eye masks they stretch and yawn. They look tired.

The official arrival was scheduled for 7:30 A.M. but you will not leave the ship for two more hours. In a less shell shocked state you would have noticed that the harbour is in fact nowhere to be seen. They were just trying to sell you breakfast.

At the 7 A.M. announcement the passengers begin to crowd at the exits. You join them. Desperate to escape. After an hour you go out to the deck to escape the increasing tension by the doors. It felt as if a riot was building.

At 9 A.M. you are down in the guts of the ship. The furious engines of the cars shout impatiently, the door to freedom lowers down slowly. As you weave through towards your car you see the seasick dog. He moves towards you and the owner braces himself, wrapping the lead twice around his thick hand such that he cannot pull away. You reach out. The owner says 'Vorsichtig' (Careful). The dog tilts his nose up at you and you rub the top of his head. The owner is surprised, normally the dog is not good with strangers he says. It's ok you say, you press your forehead to the dog's thick skull, "We've been through a lot together." The owner is perplexed as you walk away.
Written January 2, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

hafhap
Hingham, MA23 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2018 • Family
I booked a ferry for 4 from Naples to Capri on Directferries. The ferry refused to take your tickets. I went to your ticket office at the Port of Napoli and was told I they c ouldn't help me. I was forced to buy 4 new tickets directly from the ferry provider. I followed up by sending all the receipts and tickets to both the ferry service and your customer service. I was told by your office that my tickets were non-refundable. So although I was required to buy a new set of tickets from the ferry service directly-you wouldn't refund me for the tickets I purchased. Direct Ferries is a scam.
Written September 27, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Russell W
Lincoln, NE337 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2015
My wife and I took a Tirrenia ferry from Palermo to Napoli overnight. We booked a two person sleeping cabin, with a late check out and breakfast included. We had a great dinner in the main restaurant, prix fixe menu. The quarters were comfortable. The continental breakfast was good. The ferry is a great way to get from point to point when available and in my opinion a good value, while saving time for the important things on your itinerary. Be sure you have bar coded boarding passes and not just reservation document. The Tirrenia ticket office faces away from terminal in Palermo.
Written September 16, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

LesleyGrimes
Greater London, UK24 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2018 • Couples
Dirty old and expensive. Chaos boarding with cars...worse having to reverse off with no competent staff to guide drivers.
Do not book a cabin...ferry is dirty old ripped curtains..bathroom old and dirty...matresses dip in the middle....noise horrendous as old ferry.so no chance of sleep.
Staff not very cheerful and prices in cafe and restaurant double even a capital city tourist price.
AVOID booking....drive to Olbia or porto Torres and get Sardinia ferries much nicer!
Written September 10, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

mstanco
Clermont, FL73 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2019
I travelled on the over night ferry from Naples to Palermo on December 1st 2019. The check in on the ferry was a little unorganized but once the wifi started working, it went extremely fast. I reserved an outside cabin (204) and it was very comfortable. I had a drink in the lounge but did not experience and food options (my choice). Overall, I would travel with this company again in the future.
Written December 24, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

CFM1957
Bluemont, VA11 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2019 • Couples
My wife and I took the Terrenia overnight ferry Vicenza Florio from Naples to Palermo to save a few Euros and to try something different. We booked a cabin (well worth the extra cost, beats sleeping in the bar area) on-line using Directferries.com.

To get to the ferry, we took the orange Alibus from the airport. Be advised, the ferry port is the last stop, not the next to last stop as depicted on the sign inside the bus. As it was several hours before we could board, we utilized a luggage rental locker at the ticket office (biglietteria) next to the Alibus stop. The large locker was just big enough to accommodate our medium sized bag.

From there, we went to the Terrenia office to ensure our ticket was in order. This office is about 500 meters north east of the Ali bus stop. At this office, the friendly staff changed our on-line order print out to an actual ferry ticket.

After catching some last minute food and gelato, we boarded the ferry. Boarding started at about 1:45 minutes before the posted departure time and was through the right side of the vehicle gate very close to the ticket office where we our luggage was stored.

The boarding went fine and the ferry crew was helpful and generally friendly. The cabin was small and spartan as expected, but clean and with a private (again small) toilet/shower room. We were both able to get decent night sleep as the slight rocking of the ferry and engine vibration was not a problem. The only thing that interrupted my sleep was my wife’s snoring which was not the responsibility of the ferry line.

Finally, the ferry had a sit down restaurant, a cafeteria-style restaurant and bar. But judging from the bar condition (totally worn out/ripped upholstery seating) I recommend bringing some snacks on board if you think you’re going to get hungry as I would not trust the ferry food. But then again, I did have a maxi cappuccino at the bar before we docked in Palermo and it was very good.
Written April 13, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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