Miho Museum
Miho Museum
4.5
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Monday
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sunday
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Top ways to experience Miho Museum and nearby attractions

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.


4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles346 reviews
Excellent
241
Very good
82
Average
19
Poor
4
Terrible
0

Jessica R
San Diego, CA6 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2018 • Family
The museum is beautiful, but I especially liked the entrance through the tunnel. And don't forget to watch the video that describes the construction of the museum. To get there, take a JR train from Kyoto station (towards Yusa) to the JR Ishiyama station. As you exit the station, look for signs for the buses and find the Teisan Bus (route 150) for Miho Museum. The bus leaves only once every hour at 10 minutes past the hour, starting at 9:10 with the last departure at 13:10. The bus accepts only cash (820 yen per person each way), so be prepared. No ICOCA or other cards are accepted for the bus fare. For the return, the bus leaves every hour at the hour. It is a 50-minute bus ride.
Written June 21, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Chloe T
Singapore, Singapore5 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2015 • Couples
We came all the way to visit Miho Museum due to a single reason :
it's conceptualised based on a Chinese poem "Peach Blossom Valley" written over two thousand years ago .

There once lived a fisherman in Eastern China. One day, as he was rowing up a mountain stream, he came across a peach orchard in full bloom. At the end of the orchard, he noticed a ray of light coming from a small cave at the foot of a mountain. Once inside, he found himself on a narrow road, but traveling deeper, a splendid view suddenly opened before him. There was the Shangri-La.
《桃花源记》陶渊明
林尽有山,便得一山, 山有小口,仿佛若有光......

And yes, I.M. Pei did not disappoint. I feel like I'm seeing the scenes of the poem coming to live, it is amazing.

Perhaps the only downside is, the museum's collection and exhibits are pretty limited in my opinion.
Written December 3, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

m-amom1
San Francisco, CA18 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2015 • Friends
The first thing to do is check the Miho Museum website as visiting days are irregular in this private museum. One can book a tour, but if you're adventurous, it's do-able by train and bus according to the website instructions. We took an early train from Kyoto Station to Ishiyama, only 15 to 20 minutes. Check the website bus schedule; we lined up for the 9:10 am bus since it's a 50 minutes ride. You need to pay 820 yen per person, I believe, for bus fare. When one arrives, the reception area has the vegetarian restaurant; the cafe with a limited (but tasty menu) is in the museum proper, about 20 minutes walk. Admission is cash only so be sure to have plenty of yen.

I encourage the walk through the garden to the left before entering the spectacular tunnel. (Grab a loaned green umbrella if it's raining, but that only adds to the atmosphere.) The view when one emerges from the pedestrian tunnel is awesome.
Try to get to the English video showing of architect I.M. Pei's design and construction project; it's to the right of the main entrance in a lower theatre just beyond the first floor
gift shop.

We were lucky enough to arrive at a special exhibit of Jachuko and Buson in the extensive galleries to the right. Formidable! I'm not as intrigued by the permanent collection as it's quite eclectic and Western art-oriented, but treasures do abound.

Our group of three adults had sandwich sets in the cafe overlooking green vistas in the rain. It's not inexpensive, but this whole day is a special excursion! Be sure to check the very nice gift shops for special gifts, or postcards since no photographs can be taken inside the galleries, though the architectural features can be snapped.

The Miho Museum is an architectural jewel, but the planning to access this site needs attention to detail. It's an expensive excursion, and probably best for adults or those over 14. But it's a fair amount of standing and walking (on exquisite limestone floors) so those physically challenged may find this a difficult trip, too. There is a free shuttle, as others have noted, through the tunnel and to the museum entrance, though.

Most people will queue for the public bus; check the schedule beforehand as the bus runs infrequently. We did extend our day by reserving a cab to drive over to the Shigaraki Ceramic Center to see exhibits and visit potters and the famous ancient
uphill pottery kilns. (We had a Japanese speaker call a local cab company several days in advance; I think in Shigaraki?) However, the one car train from Shigaraki station is also infrequent; only 1 an hour and 2 connections to return to Kyoto so plan accordingly.
Written July 13, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

matthiviol
Cologne, Germany24 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2014 • Friends
As a great amateur of art and architecture, this is a "must" if you are visiting Central Japan. I've known about the Miho museum since many years after reading about the architect I.M.Pei. We were very surprised that all our Japanese friends did not know about this beautiful site. The museum is really hidden in the mountains, accessible by traversing a tunnel either on foot or with an electric trolley. The museum offers not many, but great oeuvres of Asian and western culture of all periods. So, not a really specialized collection.Enjoy the always exciting architecture of the unique place and the landscape around the site.
Written August 7, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Lee N
Nelson, New Zealand23 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2014 • Friends
Although it takes a bit of time to get to Miho from Kyoto, this extraordinary museum is a must see attraction for anyone interested in the best art, antiques, and modern architecture in Japan. Every detail has been masterfully thought through and constructed to perfectly accentuate this aesthetic feast. Even the cherry trees, which were in full bloom when I was there in early April, are arranged to provide the most inspiring vistas. The minimalist-style architecture with its clean lines and lack of clutter provides the perfect backdrop for the art. Then there's the art itself! They have gone after and collected the very best of the best! This museum houses multiple National Treasures which are not only extremely rare, but awesomely beautiful. Although you obviously can't take these with you, the Museum offers a great number of high quality books with great photos of your favorite pieces. All together, a breathtaking experience!
Written May 23, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

eddy-010
Rotterdam, The Netherlands230 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2013 • Couples
The building was designed by the acclaimed Chino-American architect IM Pei, who also designed the pyramid for the Louvre in Paris and the Kennedy Library in Boston. The setting in the mountains is very special and harmonious despite the modern design. The exhibits, ancient art from Greece, Mesopotamia, Persia, Rome, China and Egypt are very interesting and well presented. It is some 50 km out of Kyoto, but within easy reach if you have a (rental) car.
Written July 24, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

beegee_10
Quezon City, Philippines25 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Went to Miho one fine April morning all the way from Osaka. It took us a total of three hours, a subway (to Umeda), train (to Ishiyama 13 mins. past Kyoto) and a long bus ride through the countryside that cost almost 2,000yen just to get there -- but it was all worth it.

I was actually more interested in seeing the museum itself than the works within, since it was done by I.M. Pei, who also did the Louvre pyramid. Having read that the Miho was built within the mountain and that they painstakingly put it all back into place upon completion, I just had to see what sounded like an architectural marvel for myself. And I certainly wasn't disappointed. The tunnel leading the visitor from the reception area to the actual museum builds up the excitement for what lies round the bend. Unless you absolutely can't, I recommend walking through the cherry blossom-lined (at that time) 500-meter path instead of taking the electric cart. An awesome experience in itself.

The 2010 spring exhibition: "Miho Grandama Arte della Luce" celebrating the 100th birth anniversary of the mother of MIho's founder is worth checking out (runs until June 6), apart from its permanent collection. Also viewed the audio-visual presentation on how the museum was built and had an "organic" lunch at the restaurant in the Reception Pavilion.

In hindsight, my only regret was not buying more items at the souvenir shop and that not too many people know about this wonderful place. But then, that may just be a big part of its charm. Very much worth the journey.
Written April 15, 2010
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Kwakaku
Sakai, Japan2,192 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2018 • Couples
Miho Museum was designed and laid out by Mr. Ieoh Ming Pei, a Chinese-American designer. The design theme and concept was based on The Peach Blossom Spring Story, a fable Written by Tao Yuanming (365-427). In the story a fisherman sailed up a river and got to the source of it, a grotto. He squeezed through the grotto, and found a utopia at the opposite end of the grotto.

I got off my car at the car park, walked to the reception building, bought tickets at a discount with the coupons offered by the hotel we had stayed in. With the tickets in our hands, we walked up a track and through a tunnel, to find a museum building across a bridge.

In the building, we watched 133 masks of Japanese No Play, which is known for its misty and profound beauty. I have never seen a No Play, and was surprised to know their masks were made to make plays more real. I kept watching masks, wondering what on the earth the realism they had in their minds.

When I encountered a mask of “yase-otoko” (literally a thin man), I realized what the reality is. The man had fallen into hell, and his face had been emancipated from suffering of the torments of hell. I found another mask of “yase-onna” (literally a thin woman). She had had the same story.

Japanese people at our age had supposed to retire on pensions at the age of 60. Now we are supposed to work for another 5 years for discounted salaries to get discounted pensions later. I deeply sympathized and identified myself with the thin and weak expressions of the “thin" people.

After the realization of the reality, I came to be invited into the deep psyche of my inner self.

If you are interested in facing your reality, the exhibition of No-Play masks will welcome you till June 3.

Being exhausted with facing 133 realities, I walked out of the museum building and faced the tunnel. The shape of the bridge cables and tunnel clearly reminded me of the Chinese faith and belief behind the Chinese character “xuan”. Yes, Mr. Pei was definitely a Chinese-American. For them, the Peach Blossom Spring and the grotto to it should be something like this. Stepping through the tunnel, I found cherry blossoms blooming out of the exit. I was stunned to wonder whether the museum where I realized the reality was a utopia through the grotto or the real world where artificially planted cherry trees were brightly blooming was a utopia through the grotto. The shape of the tunnel Mr. Pei designed tacitly suggested an answer.
Written March 31, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

josephine2
Sydney, Australia181 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2014 • Couples
We thought Naoshima was the ultimate art destination, but this is going to remain an equally top highlight for us from this trip. As other reviewers have said, the architecture and location is absolutely outstanding, and the current exhibitor was fascinating and impressive. We took the audio guide which was excellent and definitely worthwhile. The three shops were all filled with desirable merchandise - we bought books about the museum and cards and other small gifts. We had a sandwich lunch in the cafe and later had coffee there. The cafe looks onto a wonderful garden - try and get a window table. We would have eaten in the restaurant but couldn't tear ourselves away from the exhibition for the time to get there ((back near the ticket office). As it was, we ended up spending the whole day there - which we definitely hadn't planned. Wouldn't have missed it for the world. If you love architecture, landscaping and art you just have to go.
Written May 21, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

LaBu
San Francisco, California244 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2013 • Couples
We wish we could give five stars to the Miho Museum several times over, because this magical destination is superlative in many different ways. The setting is awesome -- a mountainous area wooded with maple. The architecture is spectacular -- the masterpiece of the world’s greatest living architect. The permanent collection has some pieces that amaze because they’re like things you’ve seen before only better, and other pieces that amaze because you’ve never seen anything like them before. And the display of the collection is as fine as we’ve seen in any museum in the world.

You arrive at a visitors center. After purchasing your ticket, you proceed (on foot or a shuttle) along a winding uphill path lined with cherry trees, until you reach a tunnel. The tunnel is curved so you can’t see the end, lined with what appears to be silver, and made preternaturally quiet by a sound-deadening system in the walls. It takes about ten minutes to walk through the tunnel. At the end of the tunnel is a suspension bridge that crosses a deep ravine. On the other side of the ravine are a high ridge and the museum. But the museum is built into, not on top of, the ridge. What is above-ground is mainly glass.

The interior is light and airy, with glass ceilings and French limestone walls. It’s also remarkably spacious; few museums in the world can afford to be as profligate with their space as is the Miho.

The museum is divided into two wings. The south wing houses items from the permanent collection; the north wing, temporary exhibits. We ran out of time viewing just the permanent collection.

Most of the permanent collection consists of ancient art, defining ancient art to mean objects dated to 1000 AD or earlier. The collection includes items from a swath of Eurasia extending from Rome and Egypt in the west to China in the east, with many items from the middle of this swath – Iran, Afghanistan.

Among the jaw-droppers on display the day we visited the Miho:

A 1st cent. AD Roman fresco depicting a garden with flowers, birds and a fountain, the fresco in superb condition, its colors still luminous.

A 6th-7th cent. AD Sogdian (yes, Sogdian – Central Asian, Zoroastrian) funerary couch consisting of eleven marble panels, each about two feet high, filled with lively scenes of Sogdian life and Zoroastrian religious practices, carved in low relief with pigments and gold. The couch was supposedly found in China.

A ten-inch-high gold horse, created by the 2nd cent. BC Han Chinese as a form of currency used to buy horses from Central Asia.

It takes a while to get to the Miho Museum from Kyoto, about an hour and a quarter if you time things correctly. But if you follow the instructions on the museum’s website, getting there isn’t difficult.

Despite the fact it has been collecting only since the late 1980s, the Miho has leapt into the ranks of the world’s top museums. If you need a compelling reason to travel to Japan, this is it.
Written June 17, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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