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Katori Jingu Shrine

308 Reviews

Katori Jingu Shrine

308 Reviews
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1697-1 Katori, Katori 287-0017 Chiba Prefecture
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Historic sites in Chiba & Ibaraki Private tour with Driver
Bus & Minivan Tours

Historic sites in Chiba & Ibaraki Private tour with Driver

Start from your hotel in Tokyo 23 wards and travel to Boso-no-Mura.<br>You could enjoy Japanese scenery of 150 years ago, old samurai residences, farmhouses, and other buildings.<br>Next, travel Japanese old village in Sawara city. Experience small river cruse in the village.<br>Finally, enjoy Ushiku Daibutsu the world tallest stature of budda. You could watch scenic view from chest part of the stature.<br>Conclude the tour when you will be dropped off at your hotel in Tokyo 23 wards.<br>This is private tour and you could customize the route.(Please contact us if you have your preference.)
$687.45 per adult
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Nashimi wrote a review Sep 2020
7 contributions1 helpful vote
+1
Katori Jingu Shrine is amazing! I found out about this place through Katori's official English Facebook page, Little Edo Sawara. They talk about the history of the shrine and have amazing pictures (links below) and I had been wanting to come here for a while now! The path up to the shrine was beautiful and at the top of the path is this pond which reflects the nature around it. It was so peaceful and was such a nice place to relax. The shrine itself was black, which was really cool because I had never seen a black shrine before! There weren't too many people, which is a shame because it's a very nice shrine, but also kind of nice because it made it feel less touristy and more like the true traditional Japan, surrounded by nature. There were also deer behind the shrine! If you like to explore, there are all of these nooks and crannies to go through and you can discover all sorts of things, which was fun! Getting there, though, was a bit difficult. There are no trains or busses that really go there, so most people take taxis or walk, which takes about an hour from Sawara Station or Katori Station. I opted for walking so that I could see the countryside, but apparently, they offer electric bikes at the tourism association for 500 yen (not confirmed)! Anyways, highly recommend this place. *Little Edo Sawara Links* History: https://www.facebook.com/little.edo.sawara/posts/145728186809248 Autumn: https://www.facebook.com/little.edo.sawara/posts/153844135997653 Cherry Blossoms: https://www.facebook.com/little.edo.sawara/posts/222310249151041
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Date of experience: September 2020
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ANI_TOKYO wrote a review Apr 2018
Nishitokyo, Japan266 contributions53 helpful votes
+1
It was my 1st visit and best ever experience to see the annual event "Tauesai" with Saotome girls. the event I saw was annual event schefuled on every 1st saturday and sunday.
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Date of experience: April 2018
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Keizo wrote a review Sep 2017
Kawasaki, Japan1,483 contributions243 helpful votes
+1
This shrine is No.1 Shrine for Kazusa country(upper half of Chiba prefecture) and I enjoyed. Personally I prefer Kashima to Katori though.There is a one day bus tour from Shinjyuku,Tokyo to visit 3 shrines in the same area and I took it. If you go to Kashima only, you can use JR train but to visit 3, it is time consuming changing trains, riding buses etc so it is recommendable to go on a tour bus. Not so many visitors visit this shrine so in that sense, good place to get relaxed and meditate. Stone here suppresses tail of catfish causing earthquake while that in Kashima suppress its head. I saw an anchor of retired Japanese self defense force training ship ''katori'' which ws named after this shrine.
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Date of experience: September 2017
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percyvakil wrote a review Apr 2017
Mumbai, India2,548 contributions482 helpful votes
+1
The Katori shrine, or Katori Jingu as it is known is an ancient shrine of the Shinto order said to have been started over two and a half thousand years ago. The Honten and other structures have been rebuilt many times over the centuries. The current structures were built around 1700 AD. I went to Katori in February. I took a train from Narita to Sawara. After looking around in Sawara, and lunch there I asked how to get to Katori Jingu. A tourist office (no one spoke English) pointed and gestured for me to take a taxi from Sawara station. Once there, the first thing you see is a wooden gateway with a forested area behind. Through the gateway is a path through the woods, sloping upwards with carved stone pillars on both sides. Inside there's a set of steps leading to the main temple. The temple is a black wood structure and is beautiful. Getting back was a problem. There was no taxi and no one around spoke English. I got to the nearby Katori station but there was no one there and no ticket machine or counter. After waiting half an hour and seeing no one around, I saw a sign on the railway platform pointing in the direction of Sawara town. I walked for an hour till I got to Sawara station. I was told later that I could have boarded a train at Katori and bought the ticket on arrival at Narita (information not confirmed) I also found out later there are local busses from Sawara station passing the shrine, both ways.
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Date of experience: February 2017
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ART196 wrote a review Nov 2016
244 contributions139 helpful votes
Some cheeky pictures from Kashima Grand Shrine. When we went martial artists were gathered to train for an embukai and so our main part of call was the Butokuden, a large dōjo at the shrine. Although we didn’t have time to see all of the grounds, I saw the main part of it. Kashima-jingū is ancient and its founding as a holy place predates recorded history. In the Heian Period it was promoted to a first rank Imperial Shrine. It’s oldest structures date to the Early Edo Period, including the Rōmon, one of the largest shrine gatehouses in the country (the largest gates are mostly found in temples). The god Takemikazuchi enshrined here is a martial arts deity venerated in dōjo across Japan, and the shrine is the birthplace of Kashima Shintō-ryū, one of Japan’s most prestigious sword schools. When I have more time I should like to revisit here at some point and explore all of the shrine, which includes a deer enclosure and torii supporting a tree bough over a pond.
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Date of experience: October 2016
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