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4 Days Expedition From Bangkok to Angkor Wat

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$290.00
Date
2 travelers
What to Expect
Itinerary

Day 1: Bangkok or Pataya or Koh Chang - Siem Reap - Tonle Sap Great Lake

Stop At: Poipet City Hall Office, Krong Poi Pet, Cambodia
06:00am  Pick up at your Hotel in Bangkok or Pattaya or Koh Chang

10:30am  Arrive at Poi Pet Border / Entry Cambodia. (Not Include VISA)

11:30am  Depart for Siem Reap 152 kms. (around 2 hours drive)

01:30pm  Arrive at your Standard hotel in Siem Reap Check in, Freshen up 3:30PM Afternoon tour to Tonle Sap Lake

on private boat and the incredible Floating Village.

05:30pm  Return Hotel. Evening Free to explore Siem Reap. (Pub Street, Restaurants, Night Market)
Duration: 40 minutes

Stop At: Chong Kneas Floating Village, Tonle Sap, Siem Reap Cambodia
3:30PM Afternoon tour to Tonle Sap Lake on private boat and the incredible Floating Village.

05:30pm  Return Hotel. Evening Free to explore Siem Reap. (Pub Street, Restaurants, Night Market)
Duration: 3 hours

No meals included on this day.
Accommodation included: Overnight at Standard hotel in Siem Reap

Day 2: Angkor Wat - Angkor Thom - Bayon and Ta Prohm temple

Stop At: Angkor Wat, Siem Reap 17254 Cambodia
Angkor Wat (/ˌæŋkɔːr ˈwɒt/; Khmer: អង្គរវត្ត, "City/Capital of Temples") is a temple complex in Cambodia and one of the largest religious monuments in the world, on a site measuring 162.6 hectares (1,626,000 m2; 402 acres).[1] Originally constructed as a Hindu temple dedicated to the god Vishnu for the Khmer Empire, it was gradually transformed into a Buddhist temple towards the end of the 12th century.[2] It was built by the Khmer King Suryavarman II[3] in the early 12th century in Yaśodharapura (Khmer: យសោធរបុរៈ, present-day Angkor), the capital of the Khmer Empire, as his state temple and eventual mausoleum. Breaking from the Shaiva tradition of previous kings, Angkor Wat was instead dedicated to Vishnu. As the best-preserved temple at the site, it is the only one to have remained a significant religious centre since its foundation. The temple is at the top of the high classical style of Khmer architecture. It has become a symbol of Cambodia,[4] appearing on its national flag, and it is the country's prime attraction for visitors.[5]

Angkor Wat combines two basic plans of Khmer temple architecture: the temple-mountain and the later galleried temple. It is designed to represent Mount Meru, home of the devas in Hindu mythology: within a moat more than 5 kilometres (3 mi) long[6] and an outer wall 3.6 kilometres (2.2 mi) long are three rectangular galleries, each raised above the next. At the centre of the temple stands a quincunx of towers. Unlike most Angkorian temples, Angkor Wat is oriented to the west; scholars are divided as to the significance of this. The temple is admired for the grandeur and harmony of the architecture, its extensive bas-reliefs, and for the numerous devatas adorning its walls.
Duration: 2 hours

Stop At: Angkor Thom, Angkor Wat, Siem Reap 17259 Cambodia
Angkor Thom (Khmer: អង្គរធំ pronounced [ʔɑːŋ.kɔː.tʰum]; literally: "Great City"), (alternative name: Nokor Thom, នគរធំ) located in present-day Cambodia, was the last and most enduring capital city of the Khmer empire. It was established in the late twelfth century by King Jayavarman VII.[1]:378–382[2]:170 It covers an area of 9 km², within which are located several monuments from earlier eras as well as those established by Jayavarman and his successors. At the centre of the city is Jayavarman's state temple, the Bayon, with the other major sites clustered around the Victory Square immediately to the north. It is also a very big tourist attraction, and people come from all over the world to find it.
Duration: 2 minutes

Stop At: Bayon Temple, Angkor Thom, Siem Reap Cambodia
The Bayon (Khmer: ប្រាសាទបាយ័ន, Prasat Bayon) is a richly decorated Khmer temple at Angkor in Cambodia. Built in the late 12th or early 13th century as the state temple of the Mahayana Buddhist King Jayavarman VII (Khmer: ព្រះបាទជ័យវរ្ម័នទី ៧), the Bayon stands at the centre of Jayavarman's capital, Angkor Thom (Khmer: អង្គរធំ).[1][2] Following Jayavarman's death, it was modified and augmented by later Hindu and Theravada Buddhist kings in accordance with their own religious preferences.

The Bayon's most distinctive feature is the multitude of serene and smiling stone faces on the many towers which jut out from the upper terrace and cluster around its central peak.[3] The temple has two sets of bas-reliefs, which present a combination of mythological, historical, and mundane scenes. The main conservatory body, the Japanese Government Team for the Safeguarding of Angkor (the JSA) has described the temple as "the most striking expression of the baroque style" of Khmer architecture, as contrasted with the classical style of Angkor Wat (Khmer: ប្រាសាទអង្គរវត្ត)
Duration: 1 hour

Stop At: Ta Prohm Temple, Angkor Archaeological Park, Siem Reap 21000 Cambodia
Ta Prohm (Khmer: ប្រាសាទតាព្រហ្ម, pronunciation: prasat taprohm) is the modern name of the temple at Angkor, Siem Reap Province, Cambodia, built in the Bayon style largely in the late 12th and early 13th centuries and originally called Rajavihara (in Khmer: រាជវិហារ). Located approximately one kilometre east of Angkor Thom and on the southern edge of the East Baray, it was founded by the Khmer King Jayavarman VII[1]:125[2]:388 as a Mahayana Buddhist monastery and university. Unlike most Angkorian temples, Ta Prohm is in much the same condition in which it was found: the photogenic and atmospheric combination of trees growing out of the ruins and the jungle surroundings have made it one of Angkor's most popular temples with visitors. UNESCO inscribed Ta Prohm on the World Heritage List in 1992. Today, it is one of the most visited complexes in Cambodia’s Angkor region. The conservation and restoration of Ta Prohm is a partnership project of the Archaeological Survey of India and the APSARA (Authority for the Protection and Management of Angkor and the Region of Siem Reap)
Duration: 1 hour

No meals included on this day.
Accommodation included: Overnight at Standard hotel in Siem Reap

Day 3: Banteay Srei & Grand tour

Stop At: Banteay Srei, Siem Reap Cambodia
Banteay Srei or Banteay Srey (Khmer: ប្រាសាទបន្ទាយស្រី) is a 10th-century Cambodian temple dedicated to the Hindu god Shiva. Located in the area of Angkor, it lies near the hill of Phnom Dei, 25 km (16 mi) north-east of the main group of temples that once belonged to the medieval capitals of Yasodharapura and Angkor Thom.[1] Banteay Srei is built largely of red sandstone, a medium that lends itself to the elaborate decorative wall carvings which are still observable today. The buildings themselves are miniature in scale, unusually so when measured by the standards of Angkorian construction. These factors have made the temple extremely popular with tourists, and have led to its being widely praised as a "precious gem", or the "jewel of Khmer art
Duration: 3 hours

Stop At: Preah Khan, Angkor Wat, Siem Reap Cambodia
Preah Khan (Khmer: ប្រាសាទព្រះខ័ន; "Royal Sword") is a temple at Angkor, Cambodia, built in the 12th century for King Jayavarman VII to honor his father.[1]:383–384,389[2]:174–176 It is located northeast of Angkor Thom and just west of the Jayatataka baray, with which it was associated. It was the centre of a substantial organisation, with almost 100,000 officials and servants. The temple is flat in design, with a basic plan of successive rectangular galleries around a Buddhist sanctuary complicated by Hindu satellite temples and numerous later additions. Like the nearby Ta Prohm, Preah Khan has been left largely unrestored, with numerous trees and other vegetation growing among the ruins.
Duration: 1 hour

Stop At: Neak Pean, Angkor Wat, Siem Reap Cambodia
Neak Pean (or Neak Poan) [2] (Khmer: ប្រាសាទនាគព័ន្ធ) ("The entwined serpents") at Angkor, Cambodia is an artificial island with a Buddhist temple on a circular island in Jayatataka Baray, which was associated with Preah Khan temple, built during the reign of King Jayavarman VII.[3]:389 It is the "Mebon" of the Preah Khan baray (the "Jayatataka" of the inscription).[4]
Duration: 40 minutes

Stop At: Ta Som, Angkor Archaeological Park Cambodia
Ta Som (Khmer: ប្រាសាទតាសោម) is a small temple at Angkor, Cambodia, built at the end of the 12th century for King Jayavarman VII. It is located north east of Angkor Thom and just east of Neak Pean. The King dedicated the temple to his father Dharanindravarman II (Paramanishkalapada) who was King of the Khmer Empire from 1150 to 1160. The temple consists of a single shrine located on one level and surrounded by enclosure laterite walls. Like the nearby Preah Khan and Ta Prohm the temple was left largely unrestored, with numerous trees and other vegetation growing among the ruins.[1] In 1998, the World Monuments Fund (WMF) added the temple to their restoration program and began work to stabilise the structure to make it safer for visitors.[2]
Duration: 30 minutes

Stop At: Eastern Mebon, Angkor, Siem Reap Cambodia
The East Mebon (Khmer: ប្រាសាទមេបុណ្យខាងកើត) is a 10th Century temple at Angkor, Cambodia. Built during the reign of King Rajendravarman, it stands on what was an artificial island at the center of the now dry East Baray reservoir.[1]:73–75[2]:116

The East Mebon was dedicated to the Hindu god Shiva and honors the parents of the king. Its location reflects Khmer architects’ concern with orientation and cardinal directions. The temple was built on a north–south axis with Rajendravarman's state temple, Pre Rup, located about 1,200 meters to the south just outside the baray. The East Mebon also lies on an east–west axis with the palace temple Phimeanakas, another creation of Rajendravarman's reign, located about 6,800 meters due west.

Built in the general style of Pre Rup, the East Mebon was dedicated in 953 AD. It has two enclosing walls and three tiers. It includes the full array of durable Khmer construction materials: sandstone, brick, laterite and stucco. At the top is a central tower on a square platform, surrounded by four smaller towers at the platform's corners. The towers are of brick; holes that formerly anchored stucco are visible.

The sculpture at the East Mebon is varied and exceptional, including two-meter-high free-standing stone elephants at corners of the first and second tiers. Religious scenes include the god Indra atop his three-headed elephant Airavata, and Shiva on his mount, the sacred bull Nandi. Carving on lintels is particularly elegant.

Visitors looking out from the upper level today are left to imagine the vast expanses of water that formerly surrounded the temple. Four landing stages at the base give reminder that the temple was once reached by boat.
Duration: 30 minutes

Stop At: Pre Rup, Siem Reap Cambodia
Pre Rup (Khmer: ប្រាសាទប្រែរូប) is a Hindu temple at Angkor, Cambodia, built as the state temple of Khmer king Rajendravarman[1]:116[2]:73–74[3]:361–364 and dedicated in 961 or early 962. It is a temple mountain of combined brick, laterite and sandstone construction.

The temple's name is a comparatively modern one meaning "turn the body". This reflects the common belief among Cambodians that funerals were conducted at the temple, with the ashes of the body being ritually rotated in different directions as the service progressed.
Duration: 1 hour

No meals included on this day.
Accommodation included: Overnight at Standard hotel in Siem Reap

Day 4: Checkout- Siem Reap - Bangkok or Pataya or Koh Chang

Stop At: Angkor Wat, Siem Reap 17254 Cambodia
After breakfast check out and transfer you back to Thailand Bangkok or Pataya or Koh Chang
Duration: 8 hours

No meals included on this day.
No accommodation included on this day.
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Important Information
Departure Point
Traveler pickup is offered
We will pick up all customer, Please kindly give us your accommodation's address in Thailand details such as hotel name, Location and contact number.
Departure Time
6:30 AM
Duration
4 days
Return Details
Your hotel in Bangkok, Pataya or airport
Inclusions
  • Accommodation included: 3 nights
  • Hotel pickup and drop-off
  • Private tour
  • Round-trip private transfer
  • 3 nights accommodation at standard hotel
  • Bottled water
  • Breakfast
  • Local guide
  • Entry/Admission - Poipet City Hall Office
  • Entry/Admission - Chong Kneas Floating Village
  • Entry/Admission - Angkor Wat
  • Entry/Admission - Angkor Thom
  • Entry/Admission - Bayon Temple
  • Entry/Admission - Ta Prohm Temple
  • Entry/Admission - Banteay Srei
  • Entry/Admission - Preah Khan
  • Entry/Admission - Neak Pean
  • Entry/Admission - Ta Som
  • Entry/Admission - Eastern Mebon
  • Entry/Admission - Pre Rup
Exclusions
  • Lunch & Dinner
  • Visa
  • Other personal expense
  • Tip guide & Driver
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Additional Info
  • Confirmation will be received at time of booking
  • Wheelchair accessible
  • Short Dress is won't allowed at temples.
  • This price is for private tour
  • Minimum is 2 person up
  • Maximum of people per group from 15pax
  • This is a private tour/activity. Only your group will participate
Cancellation Policy
For a full refund, cancel at least 24 hours in advance of the start date of the experience.
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