Albuquerque is roughly divided into 4 quadrants by Central Ave (also known as " Old Route 66") running East  to West ,and The Santa Fe Railroad, which runs North to South. You'll hear the quadrants referenced as Northeast (NE), Northwest (NW), Southeast (SE), and Southwest (SW). Within these quadrants, and sometimes straddling the boundaries, are Albuquerque's neighborhoods.

Northwest:

  • Downtown: Includes Old Town, a thriving business (shopping) district, and the Albuquerque Biological Park
  • Old Town: First settled in 1706, Old Town is an historic gem. Spanish-style architecture, a central plaza, "main street shops," vendors, and authentic adobe buildings abound. For a straightforward walk through the neighborhood, follow the brick path.
  • Taylor Ranch: on the outer edge of the quadrant, this neighborhood is home to many parks, including the Petroglyph National Monument
  • North Valley and near North Valley: Traditionally the most rural and pastoral area of the city, historically dotted with small Spanish settlements, some of which you may still see remnant buildings that have mostly become homes. Many of these settlements have disappeared all together. Starting with the neighborhoods surrounding Old Town, these settlements ran up and down the valley along the Rio Grande.
  • Paradise Hills: Mostly suburbia, this area is one of the oldest neighborhoods on the west side of the Rio Grande. It's not too old though.It was first developed in the 1970s. .
  • Corrales: Another old area along the river, is known for adobe homes and working farms. Corrales is a separate village that has been there since the late 1600s to early 1700s. It is bordered to the north and west by Rio Rancho, the second largest city in New Mexico.

Northeast:

  • Nob Hill/Highland: Rte 66 was Albuquerque's only paved road in 1936. It carried Great Depression migrants West to California. The neighborhood today is known for it's roadside architecture, fine dining, antiques, and more. It's a great, walkable neighborhood. Neon arches on Central Avenue mark the North and South ends of Nob Hill.
  • Uptown: Lots of shopping malls and office complexes surrounded by neighborhoods.  There is sometimes described a midtown area between uptown and downtown.
  • Northeast Heights - Suburbia at its best. Neighborhoods and strip malls abound. This is a very broad description and can include the neighborhoods near UNM to the North Albuquerque Acres.  The Albuquerque Academy is located in this quadrant.
  • Sandia Heights: a neighborhood with a more rural feel, at the base of the Sandia Mountains. Many hiking trails start here. A ride on the Sandia Park Aerial Tramway gives spectacular views.

Southeast:

  • Nob Hill/Highland: Rte 66 was Albuquerque's only paved road in 1936. It carried Great Depression migrants West to California. The neighborhood today is known for it's roadside architecture, fine dining, antiques, and more. It's a great, walkable neighborhood. Neon arches on Central Avenue mark the North and South ends of Nob Hill.
  • Southeast Heights: Host area to Kirtland AFB and Sandia National Labs. One of the oldest neighborhoods in Albuquerque, Ridgecrest, in this part of town. Marilyn Monroe had a home in Ridgecrest.
  • Four Hills: An upscale area that surrounds a country club and borders the AFB lands.
Southwest:
  • Downtown:  a thriving business and shopping district, adjacent to the Near North Valley, Old Town and the Albuquerque Biological Park, which includes the zoo, south of Central on 10th Street, and the Botanic Garden/Aquarium which is north of Central just west of Rio Grande Blvd. Near downtown are the older neighborhoods of Huning Highland and the Albuquerque Country Club.
  • Old Town: First settled in 1706, Old Town is an historic gem. Spanish-style architecture, a central plaza, "main street shops," vendors, and authentic adobe buildings abound. For a straightforward walk through the neighborhood, follow the brick path. Old Town hosts many of the states finest museums.
  • South Valley: An eclectic mix of industry, farms and neighborhoods.

The interstates, I-25 and I-40, have somewhat reshaped the layout of Albuquerque and only vaguely correspond to the quadrant layout still used by the residents.  For further orientation, see the article on Getting Around.

 

For maps, check out the following:

Nob Hill - Highland District

Virtual Abuquerque