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“For Satchmo lovers only” 5 of 5 stars
Review of Louis Armstrong House Museum

Louis Armstrong House Museum
34-56 107th Street, Corona, NY 11368
718-478-8274
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Ranked #1 of 3 things to do in Corona
Certificate of Excellence 2014
Activities: Antiquing, Biking, City walk sightseeing, Dancing, Dining, Drinking, Fishing, Getting married, Golfing, Group tours/bus tour, Group tours/city tour, Group tours/day tour, Group tours/walking tour, Hiking, Horseback riding, Ice skating, Jogging, Kayaking, Nightlife, People-watching, Rock climbing, Shopping, Tennis, Viewing wildlife, Walking
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Owner description: The legacy of the legendary jazz instrumentalist and vocalist, Louis Armstrong, is preserved at this Queens museum.
New York City, New York
Top Contributor
748 reviews 748 reviews
330 attraction reviews
Reviews in 211 cities Reviews in 211 cities
496 helpful votes 496 helpful votes
“For Satchmo lovers only”
5 of 5 stars Reviewed October 16, 2013

The year is 1943. Satchmo has a new bride, his fourth wife, Lucille Wilson. He is coming back from a tour knowing that Lucille has purchased a house for the two of them to live in. He has not own a house up to this moment. He gives the address that Lucille had sent him to the cab driver. When the taxi pulls in front of this two story brick house with garden, quite impressive for the times, especially for somebody born and raised in ultimate poverty in Storyville, he tells the cab driver that there must be a mistake: he cannot be the person living in the wonderful place!

Yet, Satchmo and Lucille lived there together for thirty years, until his death in 1971. When Lucille died in 1983, she left the house to the City of NY. The City, doing what every large bureaucracy does, let the house gather dust and deteriorate for twenty years. The only signs of life were the jazz concerts in the garden every Fourth of July: anybody and everybody who was famous jazzmen still alive had performed on that little platform in the backyard of the Armstrong house. Louis always claimed he was born on the Fourth of July 1900. He was not, he was born in August of the following year, but the concert were honoring him on the Fourth of July.

Finally, twenty years after Lucille’s death, after a huge fund-raising effort, the house opened as museum. It is a must to see for any fan of this great musician: just to be in the same place where he lived for so long (in between tours), to hear his voice on the recordings, to walk in the garden and think of all the great jazz players who have been here is very emotional. The house represents Lucille’s taste, obviously. But the top floor, where his area was, with recordings and books and his voice on the speakers is truly moving.

If you love Satchmo, you must go, it’s unique experience. Don’t let the neighborhood discourage you. Yeah, I know, Corona sounds like the end of the Earth, but if you don’t have a car, you can take the Number 7 subway and then walk for two long and four short blocks and you are there. It’s not a pleasant neighborhood, but you are not going there to meet the neighbors, you are going because you love Satchmo and his Wonderful World.

I was there last night, celebrating the tenth anniversary of the opening of the house (which I also attended, being an avid Armstrong fan). The Hot Sardines had a concert in the garden: complete with New Orleans jazz, a singer with the voice of Billy Holiday, only happier, and a tap dancer to top it all! I think this is the best new jazz band I’ve heard in a long time. I understand they can often be seen and heard at Joe’s Pub on Lafayette, I plan to go hear them again, I really liked these guys. $30 bought you the concert, a visit of the house, wine & beer of quite unlimited proportions and corn bread and gumbo cooked following Louis’ recipe, you cannot beat this. Normally, admission to the house is quite modest for what it is, you would not want to miss it.

Visited October 2013
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New Jersey
Top Contributor
97 reviews 97 reviews
53 attraction reviews
Reviews in 26 cities Reviews in 26 cities
42 helpful votes 42 helpful votes
“Satchmo's wonderful world”
4 of 5 stars Reviewed October 13, 2013

Take 7 train up to Corona Station...Then walk a few blocks ( fully explanation of the museum's website) and enjoy this tiny and famous home...Full of Armstrong's atmosphere this a must for jazz lovers..You will find from personal items to jokes in his own voice ( through recorded tapes) and this is as good as it gets in his own den...You can only enter via guided tour, but if there's a tour running you can always wait for the next one in the Japanese garden...The kitchen and bathroom are custom made jewels!!...

Visited October 2013
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This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Kansas City, Missouri
Senior Reviewer
9 reviews 9 reviews
6 attraction reviews
Reviews in 5 cities Reviews in 5 cities
2 helpful votes 2 helpful votes
“Worth the walk”
5 of 5 stars Reviewed September 22, 2013

Worth the short walk from the Subway station. This house museum is interesting on a couple of different levels. The decor of the house is magnificently 60's and 70's. The biographical information on Louis Armstong and his place in music and history is presented nicely while touring the house. Since Armstong was such a baseball fan the museum also has a few pieces of baseball memorabilia. The walk from the subway station is a glimpse of a working queens neighborhood; the staff referred me to a local bakery that had a fantastic empanada.

Visited September 2013
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New Orleans
Senior Contributor
28 reviews 28 reviews
17 attraction reviews
Reviews in 6 cities Reviews in 6 cities
33 helpful votes 33 helpful votes
“Louis Armstrongs home in Corona New York”
5 of 5 stars Reviewed August 29, 2013

Big admirer of Louis Armstrong so went to his house in Corona Queens. I am from New Orleans so it was a real thrill to see where he lived the majority of his adult life. Very modest home for someone like Louis. The neighborhood today is very hispanic, and as we got off the subway and started following the map people gave us directions because they knew where we were going. The people at the museum told us they have never had a break-in that the people in the neighborhood look after the place. Loved the bathroom and the kitchen is very retro, amazing home of an amazing musician and person. A must see if you go to New York

Visited August 2013
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Queens, New York
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20 reviews 20 reviews
Reviews in 19 cities Reviews in 19 cities
19 helpful votes 19 helpful votes
“Satchmo lives in Corona!”
5 of 5 stars Reviewed August 28, 2013

Do you know how Louis Armstrong got his nickname Satchmo? They said he had a mouth as big as a satchel! You will learn this and so many other interesting things if you visit this landmark house on 107th Street in Corona and take the tour...well worth the $10 admission price. LA was born in New Orleans but chose to live in this middle class working neighborhood with his wife Lucille, until he died. All the original furnishings from the 70's are still in the house and your guide will explain everything in detail. You will also get to watch a video and see/hear clippings of Louis playing the trumpet and singing in various rooms of the house. The tour lasts about 45 minutes and there is also a beautiful garden outside where you can sit and enjoy a picnic lunch. In the summertime they have jazz concerts on Saturday afternoons and we recently attended a big birthday bash for LA on July 4th in the outdoor Japanese gardens. It was great.

The gift store has a collection of unique gifts, such as erasers, pencils shaped like g-clefts, his creole red rice and beans recipe, cds and more! Be sure to pick up a listing of all the local restaurants in the neighborhood that serve ethnic foods. We stopped at a nearby Colombian local place and ate home-made empanadas, red rice and beans and had Colombian sodas and the total for two people was only $10. Then you can head over to 108 Street afterwards for a refreshing ice at the Corona Ice King (featured in the hit tv sitcom King of Queens)....a bit of a walk but doable if you don't have a car.

I guess you can tell that we are locals and live in nearby Flushing, Queens, but this is also a perfect spot for visitors and tourists. We ran into a nice family from England who loved the exploration, riding the #7 train and enjoyed getting away from the hustle-n-bustle of Times Square. They loved seeing the houses in the local neighborhood to get more of a feel of what the boros are like. I can also suggest some other nearby attractions if you want to make a day of it in Queens.....you can visit the nearby Queens Zoo and Hall of Science, not too far away.

This is truly a hidden gem in Queens and a great experience!

Visited August 2013
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