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Money

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London, United...
posts: 4
reviews: 4
Money

Approximately how much money do you need for 24 hours in Narita.

I believe it is 250Yen for a one way ticket on the train from the airport to Narita city.

Breakfast at the hotel will be 1,200Y if i eat at the Mercure.

How much do you need for a sushi lunch and a teriyaki dinner.

Is there an entrance fee for the temple or do you pay a donation?

Could you get by on 8,400Yen (approximately $100 Australian) comfortably.

Thanks for your help.

New York
posts: 2,142
1. Re: Money

Jazzy007,

500yen for a round trip from the airport to Narita City and 1,200yen for breakfast. Shinshoji must be free to enter if my memory is correct.

In general, Sushi lunch sets would cost something like 1,000-1,500yen (small/regular), 1,500-2,000yen (medium/extra), 2,000-2,500yen (large/superior), etc., really depending on which Sushi restaurant you go.

Teriyaki (means Yakitori??) dinner would cost 2,000yen to 5,000yen without alcohol, depending on which restaurant you go and what/how much you eat.

So, 8,400yen may be OK if you are traveling alone, if you don’t drink alcohol, and if you don’t eat too much. Also, many shops and restaurants will accept credit cards if you want to eat or buy something extra, costs more than 2,000yen. VISA and MasterCard are pretty popular though AMEX is not popular in Japan.

Have fun in Narita! :-)

Toronto
Destination Expert
for Tokyo
posts: 18,647
reviews: 27
2. Re: Money

Teriyaki is usually a set menu as opposed to yakitori which you order skewers (and can add up). Teppanyaki is also expensive... hmmm.. don't seem to see a lot of those and will be pricey anyway.

In general, 2500Yen for a set dinner menu is pretty OK at a local restaurant. You have a lot of choices for less, especially it's Narita.

New York
posts: 2,142
3. Re: Money

>>> Teriyaki is usually a set menu as opposed to yakitori which you order skewers (and can add up). <<<

Thank you for clarifying, bibimbob! I don’t remember seeing a chicken (or beef) Teriyaki set in Japan while I eat fish Teriyaki (salmon Teriyaki, mackerel Teriyaki, codfish Teriyaki, etc.) there. I often eat chicken/beef Teriyaki in NYC! (LOL)

I think beef Teppanyaki has become more expensive in Japan since Japan can’t import American beef. :-)

Aoyama Dori and San...
posts: 9,375
reviews: 25
4. Re: Money

From my experience, teriyaki in Japan is far different from what is served as teriyaki overseas. Exported teriyaki is usually beef or chicken that's been cooked in a very sweet, thick sauce with more sauce heaped over the top.

I've watched the local shop (pretty authentic but still Americanized) make it. They cook the marinated chicken or beef on a bbq grill, then when it's almost done put it into a pot of "sauce" and then throw it back on the bbq for a short amount of time, then repeat again and then put it on the plate.

Once on the plate, they heap this pretty thick, sweet sauce on top (I've actually seen people ask for extra sauce....ech!) and serve.

A Japanese expat friend of mine (since returned to Japan) used to ask them for "Japanese style" and they would use different sauce and it would come out looking totally different, but pretty tasty.

There is nothing like this (the Americanized version) served in Japan that I know of. The teriyaki in Japan is probably cooked similarly but the sauce is very light and thin and not overly sweet or overbearing. I think if someone is used to the exported version they might be disappointed by the Japanese one.

London, United...
posts: 4
reviews: 4
5. Re: Money

Thank you all for your replies. I think i will take a bit more money than i was going to just to make the experience a little better.

Teriyaki in Australia does not contain as much sauce as the American version, but is probably still sweeter for the Australian taste buds. Very handy to know. I am a big fan of Japanese food so i shall give it all a go.

Again you have all been very helpful and i can't wait to visit.

Cheers!