We noticed that you're using an unsupported browser. The TripAdvisor website may not display properly.
We support the following browsers:
Windows: Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome. Mac: Safari.

driving route from Charlottetown?

Which Charlottetown hotels are on sale?
mm/dd/yyyy mm/dd/yyyy
See hotels
Texas
posts: 191
reviews: 18
driving route from Charlottetown?

We will be on a cruise that docks in Charlottetown on Sept 30. We are renting a car to drive and see the scenery. Anyone able to suggest a route that would be good? We will be there from 8:00 am - 5:00 pm.

Nan

Niagara
posts: 1,584
reviews: 16
1. Re: driving route from Charlottetown?

PEI is easily driveable. You might even get around the island.

However, the main attraction area is the north shore, especially Prince Edward Island National Park>Drive the Gulf Shore Parkway. Interesting areas are Rustico, North Rustico and Cavendish, home of Green Gables. Actual Driving time is less than 1.5 hours to Cavendish if you take the slow scenic route.

Texas
posts: 191
reviews: 18
2. Re: driving route from Charlottetown?

Thank you for your help. I am really not an Anne fan but just want to see the scenic areas. Are the dunes in the eastern part and how do they compare to the northern scenery?

Thanks again,

Nan

Prince Edward...
posts: 957
3. Re: driving route from Charlottetown?

"PEI is easily driveable" very true but you're not going to make it around the Island in your timeframe LOL.

The previous poster is correct that the North Shore is your best bet including the New Glasgow area also. Do you have maps of the area or any travel related info and where are you picking up the rental car?

Lunenburg, Canada
Destination Expert
for Saint John, Foz do Iguacu, Iguazu National Park
posts: 2,686
reviews: 7
4. Re: driving route from Charlottetown?

Hi Nan!

Let me chime in with the north shore of Prince Edward Island for a scenic, charming introductory visit, if you have just one day.

Distances on the island are not great, but country road driving doesn't move at freeway speed, and they'll be assorted stops you'll want to make as you pass along the way.

Other routes would likely be less rewarding. For instance, the southeast and east of the island are more wooded. There's less to see (other than trees) and what there is seemed to us less interesting.

The southwest in the direction of Borden and the Confederation bridge is a region of small farms and woodlots, with the ocean behind. There are few dunes and not many beaches on the south coast, though.

You'd find the north shore more scenic, with wide beaches (picturesque, even if you don't go swimming, which you most certainly will not feel like doing in late September). Start at Dalvay, at the eastern end of the national park, featuring a historic house you can poke around in. Along the way you'll see park scenery, then lots of small villages, fishing coves and hill scenery inland. The leaves will also be changing at that time, with lots of color.

If you had more time, you could continue west of Summerside (lunch in Summerside?) on Route 12, a scenic continuation of the north shore, around Grand River to Green Park, which boasts my favorite historic house on the island, one that gets far less tourism than the Green Gables region does. From the nearby village of Tyne valley, it would take you about 1 1/2 hours back to Charlottetown, on the Route 2 highway, with no dawdling along the way.

Happy travels, and let me know if I can help further!

David

capetien10@gmail.com

Lunenburg, Canada
Destination Expert
for Saint John, Foz do Iguacu, Iguazu National Park
posts: 2,686
reviews: 7
5. Re: driving route from Charlottetown?

By the way, Nan.

In the National Park, you'll want to take the Gulf Shores Parkway, right through the park itself. From Dalvay to Brackley, then (after an interruption by Rustico Bay) from North Rustico to Cavendish, this is the way that features access to the beaches and dunes.

(In-season, the Canadian parks service nicks tourists for a parking fee, but with a bit of luck the booth at the entrance will not even be staffed when you arrive. Just drive on in. The Gulf Shores Parkway is open year-round, and you have no need for the "services" they offer, such as a park map. If the booth is closed, it means no one is going to be on duty telling visitors to get out.)

The alternate east-west road, Route 6, goes through small towns with motels and small-scale commercial development.

West of New London, continue along the north coast on Route 20. Actually, the signage leads you along a marked tourist trail route, mainly following these roads, but with detours, such as the lovely Indian River Catholic church, well worth slipping inside.

Do you have a good road map? The Prince Edward Island government will send you for free the one I'm looking at right now. Their internet address is

http://www.tourismpei.com

But don't log on. Phone them at 1-800-463-4PEI so they can get the literature to you right away!

David

Texas
posts: 191
reviews: 18
6. Re: driving route from Charlottetown?

Hi David,

Thanks for the great information. I will plot the route on a map and may have more questions. Besides Summerside and the historic house do you have any other spots of interest? What is the name of the Historic House, and do you have a good place for lunch in Summerside?

I noticed you are in Lunnenberg. We also stop in Halifax. The last time we were there we had a private guide who took us around the area, Peggy's Cove and Lunnenberg. I think that was where it was.) Anyway we stopped at a little elementary school that was so pretty, I would enjoy seeing it again. We have another couple traveling with us who have not seen the area. I was wondering if you know of anyone who might be interested in giving a tour. I can't remember who we used last time.

I also remember that last time we also rented a car in PEI and just drove aruond the island. I don't even know which way we went, but we did go to some little fishing area with lobster cages.

I appreciate your help.

Thanks,

Nan

Lunenburg, Canada
Destination Expert
for Saint John, Foz do Iguacu, Iguazu National Park
posts: 2,686
reviews: 7
7. Re: driving route from Charlottetown?

Hi Nan!

I'm confident that the school you mean is Lunenburg Academy. It's located at the highest point in Lunenburg. When you're in the town, just keep driving up!

Because it's on a hilltop, the Academy is easily seen from outside Lunenburg town. This is part of the charm. It's the first thing you'll see, and it leaves an indelible first impression.

Did you know that Lunenburg is a UNESCO World Heritage Site? It's a well preserved 19th Century fishing town that maintains the exterior from that period. Just seeing the old houses and the waterfront are impressive enough. But there's much more.

Lunenburg is the wellspring of Protestant settlement in Nova Scotia. Back in the Eighteenth Century, Nova Scotia came under the control of the English, but the settlers were mostly Catholics, left over from the French era the cewntury before. This made the Britisn government nervous, fearing that the settlers would side with the French in case of a war. They wanted their own people to come, but few English folks seemed interested, preferring the Thirteen Colonies instead.

The British hit upon the idea of running ads in all the Protestant areas of Germany and certain neighboring places in France, like Montbeliard. These people spoke no English, but they were Protestant, so they could be relied upon to side with the British rather than the Catholic French government in Versailles. To sweeten the deal, promises of free land and free food were thrown in.

Hundreds answered the ads, including my ancestors and those of countless others in Nova Scotia, many of whom aren't even aware that their people came from Germany and Montbeliard a quarter century ago.

Today, the Fisheries Museum in Lunenburg is the repository for genealogical details of this migration. Lots of visitors come to the museum thinking they'll see only fishing boats, but there is a great deal more.

Lunenburg has a rich fishing heritage. It's the original home of the Bluenose, a speedy fishing schooner from the 1920s than won numerous races. That's the sailing vessel you'll see on the Canadian dime! The original Bluenose was wrecked in a storm, but today there's a full-sized replica on which you can take a sightseeing cruise when it's in port. It often sails to other North American ports as a goodwill ambassador of Nova Scotia.

Don't just drive in the town. Walk. I believe there are guided walking tours. (Check for info on the internet.) If you don't like to walk, a horse-drawn operates for the tourists. There are a number of white clapboard churches scattered around the town, well worth a peek and a photo.

There are several waterfront restaurants, offering the sparkling view of Lunebnurg harbor. Numerous B&Bs are located in the town's historic buildings. There are no chain motels, though. Building codes keep those from spoining the centuries-past charm of the old fishing town.

If you're coming with your own wheels, the finest bit of ocean scenery in Nova Scotia is to be found along a drive nearby.

Start in Mahone Bay, another charming old fishing port northeast of Lunenburg town. Follow the coastal road to Lunenburg. Not Route 3, the main road, but a series of unmarked narrow paved roads. They take you past places like Mader's Cove and Sunnybrook, an unusually pretty little stretch of cottages alongside some wealthy homes on Prince's Inlet.

Then, past Lunenburg town, take Route 332 toward Riverport. Stop at the Ovens, a series of sea caves that you can go down inside on stairways.

Then, continue on the 332 north, up the LaHave River. This road runs right along the waterfront, with almost no houses between you and the water to block the view. Most of the houses, set back from the water, are older places, and along the winding river bank you get one spendid view after another. The road eventually leads you to Bridgewater, the main street of Nova Scotia's South Shore.

David

Lunenburg, Canada
Destination Expert
for Saint John, Foz do Iguacu, Iguazu National Park
posts: 2,686
reviews: 7
8. Re: driving route from Charlottetown?

Hi Nan!

I'm confident that the school you mean is Lunenburg Academy. It's located at the highest point in Lunenburg. When you're in the town, just keep driving up!

Because it's on a hilltop, the Academy is easily seen from outside Lunenburg town. This is part of the charm. It's the first thing you'll see, and it leaves an indelible first impression.

Did you know that Lunenburg is a UNESCO World Heritage Site? It's a well preserved 19th Century fishing town that maintains the exterior from that period. Just seeing the old houses and the waterfront are impressive enough. But there's much more.

Lunenburg is the wellspring of Protestant settlement in Nova Scotia. Back in the Eighteenth Century, Nova Scotia came under the control of the English, but the settlers were mostly Catholics, left over from the French era the cewntury before. This made the Britisn government nervous, fearing that the settlers would side with the French in case of a war. They wanted their own people to come, but few English folks seemed interested, preferring the Thirteen Colonies instead.

The British hit upon the idea of running ads in all the Protestant areas of Germany and certain neighboring places in France, like Montbeliard. These people spoke no English, but they were Protestant, so they could be relied upon to side with the British rather than the Catholic French government in Versailles. To sweeten the deal, promises of free land and free food were thrown in.

Hundreds answered the ads, including my ancestors and those of countless others in Nova Scotia, many of whom aren't even aware that their people came from Germany and Montbeliard a quarter century ago.

Today, the Fisheries Museum in Lunenburg is the repository for genealogical details of this migration. Lots of visitors come to the museum thinking they'll see only fishing boats, but there is a great deal more.

Lunenburg has a rich fishing heritage. It's the original home of the Bluenose, a speedy fishing schooner from the 1920s than won numerous races. That's the sailing vessel you'll see on the Canadian dime! The original Bluenose was wrecked in a storm, but today there's a full-sized replica on which you can take a sightseeing cruise when it's in port. It often sails to other North American ports as a goodwill ambassador of Nova Scotia.

Don't just drive in the town. Walk. I believe there are guided walking tours. (Check for info on the internet.) If you don't like to walk, a horse-drawn operates for the tourists. There are a number of white clapboard churches scattered around the town, well worth a peek and a photo.

There are several waterfront restaurants, offering the sparkling view of Lunebnurg harbor. Numerous B&Bs are located in the town's historic buildings. There are no chain motels, though. Building codes keep those from spoining the centuries-past charm of the old fishing town.

If you're coming with your own wheels, the finest bit of ocean scenery in Nova Scotia is to be found along a drive nearby.

Start in Mahone Bay, another charming old fishing port northeast of Lunenburg town. Follow the coastal road to Lunenburg. Not Route 3, the main road, but a series of unmarked narrow paved roads. They take you past places like Mader's Cove and Sunnybrook, an unusually pretty little stretch of cottages alongside some wealthy homes on Prince's Inlet.

Then, past Lunenburg town, take Route 332 toward Riverport. Stop at the Ovens, a series of sea caves that you can go down inside on stairways.

Then, continue on the 332 north, up the LaHave River. This road runs right along the waterfront, with almost no houses between you and the water to block the view. Most of the houses, set back from the water, are older places, and along the winding river bank you get one spendid view after another. The road eventually leads you to Bridgewater, the main street of Nova Scotia's South Shore.

David

Texas
posts: 191
reviews: 18
9. Re: driving route from Charlottetown?

David,

Thank you for a great "arm chair" tour. I am really looking forward to seeing Halifax, Lunenburg, and PEI. Unfortunatley we won't have much time as we will be on a cruise that docks for only one day in Charlottetown and Halifax. We will try to see as much as possible. As I mentioned we did a previous cruise to the same area 3 years ago and enjoyed it very much. Next time we return we and need to stay longer.

I ordered the map by e-mail as the offices were closed. Thanks again for all the help!

Nan

10. Re: driving route from Charlottetown?

-:- Message from TripAdvisor staff -:-

This topic has been closed to new posts due to inactivity. We hope you'll join the conversation by posting to an open topic or starting a new one.

To review the TripAdvisor Forums Posting Guidelines, please follow this link: http://www.tripadvisor.com/pages/forums_posting_guidelines.html

We remove posts that do not follow our posting guidelines, and we reserve the right to remove any post for any reason.

Removed on: 12:17 am, February 26, 2010