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Disabled in Las Vegas

Perigueux, France
posts: 31
reviews: 30
Disabled in Las Vegas

As part of our trip to the USA in January we were planning a few days in Las Vegas. However, I have developed spinal problems which make it difficult to walk more than a few yards, with a walking stick. We do not have a wheelchair - does anyone have experience of Las Vegas either walking with sticks or ? wheelchair hire? Also, i see many of the hotels require long walks to get from area to area - are any hotels less of an effort please?

Vancouver, Canada
Destination Expert
for Vancouver
posts: 31,448
reviews: 39
1. Re: Disabled in Las Vegas

In my experience, hotels usually have an in house wheelchair for use while a guest is staying in the hotel. Sometimes they are lent for a certain period of time, sometimes they are lent for the whole stay. It depends on the hotel.

I just checked the Bellagio, just as an example, and find they have a fair bit of information about handicapped rooms and amenities. On the new page that opens when you click open the following link, look just above the 'contact' heading for FAQ. Open that to see the first in the list is about accessible rooms. Most hotels would have info on their websites - under amenities, or FAQs or special needs. Some wording like that.

www.bellagio.com/contact/contact-us.aspx

As well, I think you would get some good suggestions if you posted as well on the Las Vegas Forum which is here.

tripadvisor.com/ShowForum-g45963-i10-Las_Veg…

Brazil, Indiana
posts: 120
2. Re: Disabled in Las Vegas

its okay in vegas to walk on stick. Maybe there are wheelchair that can be rent if ever.

uk
posts: 1,672
reviews: 15
3. Re: Disabled in Las Vegas

You can rent a wheelchair or scooter, have it delivered to your hotel, google for links or ask your hotel conciage to organise it for you, I found Vegas one of the more disabled friendly places to get around, but don't underestimate the distances, the hotels themselves are huge!

We stayed at the manderian oriental as it was small in compassion to others, but it has no casino, which we liked the calm and also non smoking.

Deb

Edited: 9:21 am, November 24, 2012
Perigueux, France
posts: 31
reviews: 30
4. Re: Disabled in Las Vegas

Thank you so much for this! It has really reassured me and I was aware of the vast distances because of the size of the hotel. I shall definitely be following your advice. Thank you

Mount Dora, Florida
Destination Expert
for Istanbul
posts: 12,556
reviews: 206
5. Re: Disabled in Las Vegas

The US has laws that provide for equal access for disabled people so there is rarely any problem using a wheelchair in any urban area in he US. I would rent a wheelchair or a mobility scooter and have it delivered to your hotel so it is available when you arrive.

As others have mentioned, even getting around in these huge hotels in difficult if you do not walk well. Certainly getting from one hotel to another is very difficult for those of us with mobility problems. If you have a wheelchair or a scooter it is very easy to get around in a hotel, and equally easy to move from one location to another. There is always a place to enter and exit using a ramp rather than stairs, and elevators easily accommodate wheelchairs.

I am able to walk for short distances so I have never asked for a disabled room in a hotel, but if you need a roll-in shower, or a room with wheelchair accessible light switches you can request a disabled room as well.

You will have a much more pleasant experience in this city if you use a wheelchair or a scooter. There are several companies that rent wheelchairs in Las Vegas. This is a link to the one I used to use frequently. http://www.scootaround.com/locfinder.asp

Stoke on Trent...
posts: 529
reviews: 29
6. Re: Disabled in Las Vegas

We visited Vegas in June 2010 and Sept 2011. My husband uses a motorised wheelchair and we saw advertising in the hotel for motorised wheelchair hire.

Though I don't need to push my husband, I need to go with him and we found that this increased the distances I walked considerably. The major roads are crossed by pedestrian bridges accessed by escalators which of course we couldn't use. Lifts are provided but they are not always close to the escalators. This meant we spent a bit of time and extra walking finding these and getting across roads. Twice we found that they weren't working at all. Once we'd got to know where they were, we got up and down the strip more easily.

Our son thought that he'd be helpful and buy us both monorail tickets. In reality, we spent more time walking through the hotels and trying to find the disabled access lifts etc that it would have taken to just walk outside to where we wanted to go. I wouldn't recommend using the monorail as it is a very long walk through the hotels to access it.

We found Vegas a bit more stressful than other US cities from the getting around point of view but we still enjoyed it enough to go again and intend to do so again in the future.

Mount Dora, Florida
Destination Expert
for Istanbul
posts: 12,556
reviews: 206
7. Re: Disabled in Las Vegas

I almost always find that any new city is challenging. It seems to me as if they place the elevators in the most obscure locations they can possibly find. It is also true that if you are walking with a person in a wheelchair you will probably increase the number of steps because the person in the wheelchair has fewer alternatives to reach a specific destination. Public transportation can also be difficult. In some places not every tram or bus is equipped for disabled passengers and I find myself either waiting for the "right" bus or having to move to a different bus stop.

It actually takes me a couple of trips before I am completely confident that I have memorized all the routes I need to follow along my way. Hopefully, having now experienced Las Vegas you will have more practical information and your next trip will be less difficult for you.

I admire people who continue to make the effort to travel with the inconvenience of a wheelchair. Congratulations to you brave husband, and special congratulations to you for faithfully following along.

Stoke on Trent...
posts: 529
reviews: 29
8. Re: Disabled in Las Vegas

Thank you Busy-retired. My eyes were opened when my husband became a wheelchair user. Fortunately he can walk very short distances which helped in Paris when I had to carry his manual wheelchair down the steps to the boat on the River Seine. No one helped. Paris was the worst city that we have travelled to. This isn't because of the cobbled streets etc, which were difficult, but you expect that in an old city. It was the rudeness of the people. I was sworn at and reduced to tears on more than one occasion as I was not moving quickly enough. I didn't get help at all with carrying the empty wheelchair down numerous flights of stairs/steps and getting hubby up kerbs where drivers had blocked the few dropped ones there were, was a nightmare.

Paris is a beautiful city but we won't go there as a couple again.

As for Vegas, we were told that the Deuce bus prioritises disabled people who automatically go to the front of the queue. We didn't get to try this out but apparently everything stops until that person is safely boarded. Maybe the OP could try this and report back? We have travelled fairly extensively in the States and find it pretty user friendly from a wheelchair users point of view. It is just some of the older things such as the San Francisco Cable cars that can't cater well for people in wheelchairs.

Thank you for your kind comments, though people with disabilities don't have a choice in struggling with these things if they want to do anything or go anywhere. It does get very wearing as I am sure you well know.

Mount Dora, Florida
Destination Expert
for Istanbul
posts: 12,556
reviews: 206
9. Re: Disabled in Las Vegas

As my doctor often says, the alternative is a rocking chair on the front porch while you watch the world go by. I expect I will continue to make the effort until that rocking chair looks more attractive that it does today.

10. Re: Disabled in Las Vegas

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