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Bathrooms for disabled

posts: 1
reviews: 61
Bathrooms for disabled

98percent of hotels I come across have good access for disabled people like me, I have to have what you would call a 'wet room' one hotel we stayed in had a lovely wet room but gave it a 'marble floor' talk about life going before me I was terrified. I went and told the staff on duty and........nothing! This was a five star hotel. How have you coped people??

Nowy Sacz, Poland
Destination Expert
for Poland
posts: 4,024
reviews: 42
1. Re: Bathrooms for disabled

You're right, Sharon. I have acute neuropathy (amongst other problems) so I can't feel below my knees and have no balance, so a slippery or even very smooth and potentially slippery floor scares the you-know-what out of me. I have to hang onto things and make my way very slowly, or else lay towels on the floor (and there are rarely enough to do that!). Oh one more thing - sloping floors! Who puts sloping floors in a disabled bathroom??? AND tiny little fold down seats made from (apparently) papier mache. We are adults sitting down with a thud - we do not wat to feel like the seat will break! And it would be good to be able to hold it, so stronger AND wider, please!

Edited: 9:51 am, November 11, 2012
Teesside
posts: 365
reviews: 1
2. Re: Bathrooms for disabled

I take a rubber bathmat and use sunbathing towels as well as any other spare ones.

Brazil, Indiana
posts: 120
3. Re: Bathrooms for disabled

We should be thankful that some infrastructure today have space for the disabled :)

Teesside
posts: 365
reviews: 1
4. Re: Bathrooms for disabled

Christianrenee, Why should we be thankful for some infrastructure to have space for us. Are we not entitled to everything everyone else has, like going on holiday,going to the theatre,going to cinemas, going shopping etc.I dont know if you realise how insulting your post is to disabled people so I think you should think before you post.

Nowy Sacz, Poland
Destination Expert
for Poland
posts: 4,024
reviews: 42
5. Re: Bathrooms for disabled

Thanks for that, Serena. I saw post 3 earlier and was too annoyed to respond to it!

We were on holiday in India last year and touring Amber Palace. When I expressed surprise at the ramps obviously built a very long time ago, our guide said "you know, even hundreds of years ago people were injured, disabled or just simply old". Says it all, really.

Teesside
posts: 365
reviews: 1
6. Re: Bathrooms for disabled

Hi John,I saw it earlier too and had to wait until I cooled down to post, as I would have been quite hostile.Some people engage their mouths or in this case fingers before they engage their brains.

Sydney, Australia
posts: 18,758
reviews: 50
7. Re: Bathrooms for disabled

We are becoming elderly but are not disabled. Nevertheless, we were recently given a room with an "accessible" bathroom. Accessible room if you used two separate elevators and went along very long corridors, but the bathroom had a shower over a bath and a very wide lip on the bath where I presume you could sit before entering. It was the scariest, most slippery thing to negotiate that I have ever met. Is this normal?

I have had rooms with great roll in showers but this just seemed weird. It was in a modified convent in Spain, now a posh hotel.

Mount Dora, Florida
Destination Expert
for Istanbul
posts: 12,826
reviews: 208
8. Re: Bathrooms for disabled

I see lots of different "modifications" for those of us who are disabled. In Turkey there are almost no accommodations for disabled people, and often what is available is not useable. Today I noticed a tiny ramp built next to twelve steps. The ramp was at such a steep angle that it would have been folly to attempt it with a wheelchair or a scooter.

I have long sense given up hope that I will live to see one of my favorite places become more accessible so I "cope" by making whatever accommodations I can make on my own. If the floor is slippery I ask for extra towels, and occasionally I travel with a small rubber bath mat. It takes up almost no room at the bottom of my suitcase.

When I cannot use my scooter and am forced to walk I plan my trips carefully so I do not waste any steps going in the wrong direction. I make generous use of taxis, and I stop and rest often. I find that shop keepers in Turkey are happy to bring out a stool if I stop in front of a store. Usually they offer a glass of tea as well.

I understand the frustration with post three, but I also know that there are still many places in the world that have not yet become disabled friendly. In the case of Turkey I cannot imagine that all of these ancient streets and buildings could be made accessible in less than fifty years and with a huge expense. So, without any intent at being offensive, and with the recognition that we are certainly entitled to equal access, I am appreciative of those countries that do accommodate my disability. If I have to live with a disability I am thankful that I live in this time period where so many things are easily accessible, and I really appreciate the legislation in the US that makes living with a disability so very easy.

Nowy Sacz, Poland
Destination Expert
for Poland
posts: 4,024
reviews: 42
9. Re: Bathrooms for disabled

Here in Poland we have a mixture of very sensible, plain stupid and no adjustment for the disabled at all. Many many shops are upstairs - either with stels up to the door or with the enrtraces of several shops off a gallery accessed only by stairs. Shopping malls have no lifts - one in Nowy Sacz has shops on a semi-down floor and a semi-up floor, so neither is accessible.One hotel we stayed in gave us their only accessible room - which had an lordinary bathroom plus a disabed wetroom, so from that point of view was excellent, and was a double-sized room too, but it was the room furthest from reception and the restaurant, along very long corridors (fyi Lynn!). Trains are steps up from the platform, many buses are minibuses and not at all accessible.And so it goes on.

Poland is an "old" country - until the 1790s a powerhouse and with the most advanced constitution around, but it's only 20-some years since it came out of from behind the iron curtain, and it still has a lot of catching up to do.

Mount Dora, Florida
Destination Expert
for Istanbul
posts: 12,826
reviews: 208
10. Re: Bathrooms for disabled

john, I imagine that you experience some of the same barriers that I face in Turkey. In the US an "old" building is rarely more than 200 years old. In Europe 200 year old buildings are often of the "newer" variety. The task of retro-fitting ancient buildings is always controversial because often changes in the design and/or structure are necessary. In truth, I do not even know how some of the places in Turkey could ever be made accessible to those of us in wheelchairs.

I ultimately just have to conclude that there are some places, like Mt. Everest, that are never going to be experienced by a person in a wheelchair. Since I will never hike into the valleys in Cappadocia I have to be satisfied with the things I can see from the accessible paved walks and from the road.

When we are talking about an entire country, however, it is a different issue. I am sure that it is very difficult to live in a country that cannot yet provide equal access, and yes, I am appreciate of the fact that legislation in the US has made my own country much easier to manage.

In the US the ADA legislation was a long time in coming, and there were many howls of horror as it was implemented. There are still lots of places that are not fully compliant with the law. For some small business owners creating equal access entries, and/or equal access bathroom facilities has been almost prohibitively expensive. The kind of changes that must be made to the basic infrastructure are slow in coming, and they are expensive.

I hope Poland is soon able to accommodate your needs better both for your sake, as well as for those of us who would like to visit.