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High (from the US) transatlantic air fares

Brunswick, Maine
posts: 4
reviews: 6
High (from the US) transatlantic air fares

I noticed that in 2012, transatlantic air fares in the off season went from the former $800-900 to $1200, and that continues for this year. If I enter the same trip originating in Europe, the fares are still in the $800 range, regardless of the specific days travelled, or whether the airline is based in the US or Europe. Trips originating in Canada, are also somewhat lower than the US fares, in spite of the fact that some of those flights connect in the US. I realize that Europe has a number of charters to North America, but I feel that we're being ripped off, having to pay 50% more for the same trip. Is there any reasonable justification for this?

This yerar, I'm boycotting the major airlines, and using Icelandair, and if this satisfactory, I shall continue to do so; if not, I'll be visiting Europe a lot less.

Sunnyvale...
Destination Expert
for San Jose
posts: 5,684
reviews: 94
1. Re: High (from the US) transatlantic air fares

Have you noticed that the cost of businesses, operating in the US, has been increasing significantly?

Brooklyn, NY
Destination Expert
for New York City
posts: 19,864
2. Re: High (from the US) transatlantic air fares

Likely just supply and demand: demand is greater in the US for transatlantic travel than it is in Europe and Canada at the moment.

Brunswick, Maine
posts: 4
reviews: 6
3. Re: High (from the US) transatlantic air fares

This crossed my mind....maybe another indirect tax that people earning under 250K a year "aren't going to have to pay"

UK
posts: 39,783
reviews: 81
4. Re: High (from the US) transatlantic air fares

<< Is there any reasonable justification for this?>>

Supply and demand

<<This year, I'm boycotting the major airlines, and using Icelandair>>

Last time I looked at Icelandair (for either New York or Toronto to London return) they were no cheaper than BA or Air Canada or American Airlines.

Brunswick, Maine
posts: 4
reviews: 6
5. Re: High (from the US) transatlantic air fares

I'd buy the supply and demand issue, except that whenever I've flown, Americans seem to be in the minority. It may have more to do with the lack of competition from the US (no Thompson, TUI, etc.)

Icelandair from Europe is no cheaper than other airlines; from America, it's $200 cheaper to start, and a 2 bag limit that can save another$100 on return. I'm not that fond of 757's, or a fast connection at Keflavik, but for that kind of saving, I'll give it a try. I may find that the connection give me a welcome break to stretch my legs.

UK
posts: 39,783
reviews: 81
6. Re: High (from the US) transatlantic air fares

Icelandair from Europe is no cheaper than other airlines; from America, it's $200 cheaper to start,

=======

As I said, not when I looked, maybe it is at this moment?

When I wrote "for either New York or Toronto to London return" I meant that literally, eg starting in New York or Toronto (I forget which it was now or may have been both). This was in March of this year for flights in June.

Sunnyvale...
Destination Expert
for San Jose
posts: 5,684
reviews: 94
7. Re: High (from the US) transatlantic air fares

[This crossed my mind....maybe another indirect tax that people earning under 250K a year "aren't going to have to pay"]

The cost increases have not been just the transatlantic fares. It's trans-anywhere and domestic routes too. Visit Flyertalk and see similar woes for the costs of MR (mileage runs). You'll also notice that the cost of food at almost any restaurant in the US has increased similarly. Yes. There's "no tax increases for people earning under 250k per year," just this "trickle down prosperity" effect. The economy should see a contraction because of this. The record high Dow averages merely reflect a migration of money towards dividend paying stocks, since there's fewer other places remaining to reasonably invest.

Vancouver, Canada
Destination Expert
for London
posts: 45,711
reviews: 14
8. Re: High (from the US) transatlantic air fares

Fares are moveable feasts, dependent on when one wants to travel as well as supply and demand.

BA just finished another unadvertised sale for flights from Canada to Elsewhere. I saved one third on fare for travel next month; had been planning to fly in any event, but a random wander through the website a couple of weeks ago showed much more amenable fares. They offered, it would have been impolite not to make a booking.

To some extent, fares are what the market will bear, but the airlines are often willing to reduce those fares in order to get bums on seats, since an empty seat after doors close will have zero value to the airline. At some times of year airlines have no impetus to reduce fares, but if travel dates are flexible there can be bargains. It does take a bit of effort, but can pay off handsomely.

Sunnyvale...
Destination Expert
for San Jose
posts: 5,684
reviews: 94
9. Re: High (from the US) transatlantic air fares

I'm not sure to what extent Canadian businesses are affected, but US businesses have to pad all of their market rates to protect themselves from uncertain costs in an uncertain US economy, stemming from not having had a federal budget passed in over four years (i.e. a runaway and extraordinary _unpreditable_ tax environment in the months to come while huge gorillas like the ACA still get defined and unfold). Has anyone ever heard of another modern nation with no federal budget? Canada's going to be affected more than any other nation because Canada is the US' biggest trading partner and next door all at the same time.

For a given US carrier's route, you might try the same combination of start & end destination, using non-US carriers like Air Canada & Swiss. If there are more competitive rates, they will have it first, but then the supplementary taxes of European airports start adding up. I'm guessing, that of European airports, the non-EU ones will have the lowest taxes, followed by Switzerland & Turkey. The UK may have the highest.

Limerick, Ireland
posts: 1,674
10. Re: High (from the US) transatlantic air fares

see.......Aerlingus.com / BOS to Europe via Dublin

fly A330's across the atlantic

Edited: 10:00 pm, May 09, 2013